Author Topic: Orion Discussion Thread 2  (Read 60492 times)

Offline Remes

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #20 on: 05/08/2015 11:07 PM »

Offline MikeEndeavor23

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #21 on: 05/14/2015 12:38 AM »
Rigel, Betelgeuse, Bellatrix and Saiph?

Those should totally be the names of the first four capsules.

Who do we send this to? ;)

MikeEndeavor23

Offline newpylong

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #22 on: 05/14/2015 12:41 AM »
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/press-releases/2015/may/orion-mock-up.html?utm_content=sf9148527&utm_medium=spredfast&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=Lockheed+Martin&sf9148527=1

"Orion Test Lab Mockup for Next Flight Finished"

For anyone who is keeping track this is the modified structure with the mass savings and improved cable routing, etc.
« Last Edit: 05/14/2015 12:43 AM by newpylong »

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #23 on: 05/14/2015 07:45 AM »
Here's the photo of the mockup. Its stuff like this that makes it feel like 1965, but in a good way. :-)
« Last Edit: 05/14/2015 07:53 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline newpylong

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #24 on: 05/27/2015 04:47 PM »
Modifications are being made inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This is a close-up view of the service platform that will be used for offline processing and fueling of the Orion spacecraft and service module stack before launch. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program (GSDO) is overseeing the upgrades to the facility

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #25 on: 05/28/2015 10:56 AM »
Modifications are being made inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This is a close-up view of the service platform that will be used for offline processing and fueling of the Orion spacecraft and service module stack before launch. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program (GSDO) is overseeing the upgrades to the facility

Pretty amazing to see the Powerpoints turn into reality.


Offline Endeavour_01

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #26 on: 07/21/2015 02:35 AM »
NASA’s Orion Spacecraft:

Happy #MoonDay! On our next flight, Orion will pass within 100KM (62 Miles) of the lunar surface.

I cheer for both NASA and commercial space. For SLS, Orion, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, Dragon, Starliner, Cygnus and all the rest!
I was blessed to see the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-99. The launch was beyond amazing. My 8-year old mind was blown. I remember the noise and seeing the exhaust pour out of the shuttle as it lifted off. I remember staring and watching it soar while it was visible in the clear blue sky. It was one of the greatest moments of my life and I will never forget it.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #27 on: 07/29/2015 05:51 PM »
Talking about welding things together, there's going to be a google webcast of a fairing sep test, blowing panels apart :)


Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #28 on: 07/29/2015 06:06 PM »
Hmmm, only one panel. I guess they want to ensure this comes off (a previous test with all the panels saw one of them stay on I remember!) Fair play to the interview, she actually referenced that!!


Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #30 on: 07/29/2015 06:27 PM »
Pop!

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #31 on: 07/30/2015 07:03 PM »
Lockheed Martin Successfully Tests Design Changes for Orion Spacecraft’s Fairing Separation System

Data from First Test Flight Makes Technology Safer, Lighter and More Reliable

Sunnyvale, Calif., July 30, 2015 – Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT) engineers have successfully completed testing of design changes made to the NASA Orion spacecraft’s fairing separation system. These changes resulted from data collected during Orion’s first test flight on Dec. 5, 2014.

A finished Orion spacecraft has three fairings, or panels, that protect the service module radiators and solar arrays from heat, wind and acoustics during ascent into space. For the purposes of collecting data during these tests, only one fairing was separated.

The separation took about three seconds and the design changes tested were:
New push-off springs that push on the fairing for a longer period of time to provide increased safety and reliability.
As part of an ongoing mass reduction effort, the team used four crew module structural attachments instead of six.
Star trackers, or cameras that provide positioning from the stars, are used for navigation on the spacecraft. The fairing separation system pulls off the star tracker covers which prevent contamination before launch, and this process was tested for the first time.

In addition, these tests evaluated different pyrotechnic variances and higher load cases in order to prepare for Exploration Mission-1, when Orion is launched on NASA’s new Space Launch System rocket. The team was also able to collect shock data, which will be provided to the European Space Agency (ESA) to support their work designing, building and testing the service module. In fact, these same fairings will be used for service module acoustics and vibe testing taking place at NASA’s Plum Brook facility in Ohio later this year.

“The fairing separation is one of our very first critical events,” said Mike Hawes, Lockheed Martin Orion vice president and program manager. “If it doesn’t work as planned, it’s probable the mission cannot continue, and tests like this help ensure it will work right the first time and every time.”

Offline Prober

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #32 on: 09/08/2015 08:52 PM »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

Offline redliox

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #33 on: 09/16/2015 06:05 PM »
Mr. Lightfoot mentions an ISS resupply mission as an option for one Orion mission. That would be a crazy use of SLS/Orion. Please no! That's just silly use of SLS and Orion.

To put it mildly.  If Orion has to go to the ISS, it better be hauling a new module with it.

Gerst dances around the question about how far Orion will travel on Mars missions (because Orion's unlikely to be able to go to Mars).

Indeed; anyone whose done vehicle calculations knows Orion is little better than a taxi in Cislunar space and a lead paperweight at Mars.  Maybe there's a way to utilize the capsule portion of Orion for atmospheric entries, but at Mars they'd need a totally different parachute system with some retropropulsion (which Orion lacks yet something like Dragon 2 has).  At best Orion would be awkward at Mars.  It's best function would be to ferry crew from Earth to an assembly point in HEO, LRO, or the Lunar Lagrange points.
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
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Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #34 on: 09/16/2015 09:54 PM »
Mr. Lightfoot mentions an ISS resupply mission as an option for one Orion mission. That would be a crazy use of SLS/Orion. Please no! That's just silly use of SLS and Orion.

The Orion's docking ability should be tested before it goes to deep space.

Launch a LEO mission with a new 30-40 ton spacestation. The astronauts can then commission the spacestation and test docking procedures.

The extra mass allows the spacestation to have its own station keeping module and say a set of arms turning it into a flying spaceship yard.

Online Coastal Ron

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #35 on: 09/16/2015 11:07 PM »
Mr. Lightfoot mentions an ISS resupply mission as an option for one Orion mission. That would be a crazy use of SLS/Orion. Please no! That's just silly use of SLS and Orion.

The Orion's docking ability should be tested before it goes to deep space.

Orion is not really a deep space vehicle, since it's life support is limited, and the crew space is very limited.  At best it would be used for trips to the region of the Moon and back (which was the original CxP task for it).

Quote
Launch a LEO mission with a new 30-40 ton spacestation. The astronauts can then commission the spacestation and test docking procedures.

If all you need to do is test the docking system, it would be cheaper to dock with the ISS than to build a brand new type of space station.  Still a big waste of money though, since docking issues are pretty rare.  Or use the USA to send up a dummy mass with a docking adapter with the Orion so the Orion can practice on it - which would be far cheaper, and wouldn't cause such a big delay as waiting for a customer space station to be built would be.

Quote
The extra mass allows the spacestation to have its own station keeping module and say a set of arms turning it into a flying spaceship yard.

Something for the private sector to do, not NASA.  NASA shouldn't be expected to do everything, nor is it funded to do everything.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline Endeavour_01

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #36 on: 09/16/2015 11:28 PM »
On the teleconference today:

It is a No Later Than (NLT) not a No Earlier Than (NET). They are still targeting 2021. This isn't an official delay like what happened with EM-1. Also they are basing it on the President's budget and the current President isn't a supporter of SLS/Orion.

If the next President decides to support the SLS/Orion program the time will come back.

The funding levels given by NASA today result in a deficit of $1.5 Billion dollars below what Congress has authorized time and time again. If we go with what Congress has authorized we reach the level of funding NASA says is needed sometime in 2021-2022.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2015 11:50 PM by Endeavour_01 »
I cheer for both NASA and commercial space. For SLS, Orion, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, Dragon, Starliner, Cygnus and all the rest!
I was blessed to see the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-99. The launch was beyond amazing. My 8-year old mind was blown. I remember the noise and seeing the exhaust pour out of the shuttle as it lifted off. I remember staring and watching it soar while it was visible in the clear blue sky. It was one of the greatest moments of my life and I will never forget it.

Offline Jeff Lerner

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #37 on: 09/16/2015 11:32 PM »
I don't get it...why not use a Dragon 2  or Boeing Starliner to drop the crew off to cis- Lunar Space ?...even if you have to modify Dragon or Starliner, it's got to be less expensive then building Orion ?


Seems like every PowerPoint to date  had  pictures of Orion at Mars...and now it's not going there ???...ok, for good reasons perhaps but then why do you need what is a beefed up taxi ??
« Last Edit: 09/16/2015 11:35 PM by Jeff Lerner »

Offline Endeavour_01

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #38 on: 09/16/2015 11:35 PM »
I don't get it...why not use a Dragon 2  or Boeing Starliner to drop the crew off to cis- Lunar Space ?...even if you have to modify Dragon or Starliner, it's got to be less expensive then building Orion ?

Starliner doesn't have the heat shield or life support needed. Dragon has the heat shield but it doesn't have the life support or propulsion capability.
I cheer for both NASA and commercial space. For SLS, Orion, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, Dragon, Starliner, Cygnus and all the rest!
I was blessed to see the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-99. The launch was beyond amazing. My 8-year old mind was blown. I remember the noise and seeing the exhaust pour out of the shuttle as it lifted off. I remember staring and watching it soar while it was visible in the clear blue sky. It was one of the greatest moments of my life and I will never forget it.

Offline Jim

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Re: Orion Discussion Thread 2
« Reply #39 on: 09/16/2015 11:36 PM »
Orion is a deep space vehicle, it is to fly with a hab module for missions past cis lunar space.

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