Author Topic: Super Pressure Balloon  (Read 6528 times)

Offline catdlr

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Re: Super Pressure Balloon
« Reply #20 on: 03/28/2017 04:14 AM »
EUSO-SPB To Detect Cosmic Rays From Above By Looking Down

NASAWallops

Published on Mar 27, 2017
Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) from the farthest reaches of space are extremely rare, entering the Earth’s atmosphere at a rate of just one per one-square-kilometer of area per century. To unravel the mysteries associated with these cosmic rays, enter NASA’s super pressure balloon and the pioneering Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) instrument. Learn more from Principal Investigator Angela Olinto about how EUSO, flying 110,000 feet (33.5 kilometers) above the ground in a balloon, will look downward to detect these high-energy cosmic rays by observing fleeting moments of UV fluorescence over a broad swathe of the Earth’s atmosphere. (NASA/Bill Rodman)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNZhhbv_QMQ?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Super Pressure Balloon
« Reply #21 on: 04/25/2017 11:23 PM »
2017 New Zealand Super Pressure Balloon Launch

NASAWallops

Published on Apr 25, 2017
NASA successfully launched its football-stadium-sized, heavy-lift super pressure balloon (SPB) from Wanaka, New Zealand, at 10:50 a.m. Tuesday, April 25 (6:50 p.m. April 24 in U.S. Eastern Time), on a mission designed to run 100 or more days floating at 110,000 feet (33.5 km) about the globe in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitude band.

While validating the super pressure balloon technology is the main flight objective, the International Extreme Universe Space Observatory on a Super Pressure Balloon (EUSO-SPB) payload is flying as a mission of opportunity.

EUSO-SPB's objective is to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays from beyond our galaxy as they penetrate the Earth’s atmosphere. As these high-energy particles enter the atmosphere, they interact with nitrogen molecules in the air and create a UV fluorescence light. From its high-altitude vantage point, EUSO-SPB will look downward observing a broad swathe of the Earth’s atmosphere to detect the UV fluorescence from these deep space cosmic rays coming in from above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaPbQFRAVcs?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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