Author Topic: MLP Q&A  (Read 7645 times)

Offline roma847

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MLP Q&A
« on: 11/19/2014 09:09 PM »
Hey guys,

there are a lot of questions around the different Shuttle MLPs (MLP-1, MLP-2, MLP-3) like this one.

Does anyone of you know what this red device on the Stair housing is?


Source: capcomespace.net

It looks like an alarm bell, or is that a siren or a warning light?

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Manfred

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Offline Jim

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #1 on: 11/20/2014 02:05 AM »
a bell

Offline mheney

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #2 on: 11/20/2014 02:31 AM »
It seems amazing that that would survive a launch.   I mean, LOOK at those SRBs right there ....

Offline Nomadd

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #3 on: 11/20/2014 02:39 AM »
 An intrinsically safe bell. That means it goes for about $600 instead of $50.

Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #4 on: 11/20/2014 03:52 PM »
Thanks Guys,

I also think that it will be a bell, but a very robust because it has to withstand a lot when the SSWS is activated and the shuttle stack is launching in the huge fireball of the SSMEs and the SRBs.

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Manfred

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Offline Hog

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #5 on: 11/20/2014 10:09 PM »
It has a rain-bird aimed directly at it from behind, and there is a rainbird directly in front(you can see the base of the rainbird in the foreground on the left.

Here is a Sound Supression Water System Test.


The stack is off the pad by a bit before the rainbirds get water on the MLP surface.

Now I'm all curious on the surviveability of that bell.  How many "bells" did STS go through?

Next question, is this bell on the SLS MLP?
Paul

Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #6 on: 11/21/2014 03:50 PM »
Thanks Hog for this amazing video.

I don't know exactly, but I suspect it could be one of the last Discovery's missions.

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Manfred

Under construction:
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Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #7 on: 01/02/2015 03:54 PM »
Hello friends,

first I want to wish you all a Happy New Year.

Does anyone have old photos of the MLPs of the early missions with higher resolution, particularly from the Side-2 of MLP-2 during Challenger's first mission STS-6, or the following missions?

Especially the two thinner pipes located there above the LOX lines at that time were running differently for MLP-1, MLP-2 and MLP-3 and had one or two kinks.


Source: NASA (STS-115)

While the kink at MLP-2 and also MLP-3 is on the left side of the mount support interface, at MLP-1 there are two kinks, which are located on the right side of the support.


Source: NSF (NasaPhotographer) (STS-116)

Unfortunately I do not have such great photos of the early missions as STS-6.

Your help would be much appreciated.

« Last Edit: 10/07/2016 05:35 AM by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #8 on: 01/03/2015 09:18 PM »
Meantime I have found this old photo from the rollout of Challenger's STS-8 (1983), where you can only dimly recognize the running of the pipes with the inclined kink left next to the Mount support at a higher magnification.


Source: NASA

Does anyone know wherefore these thinner pipes have been used?

« Last Edit: 02/01/2015 01:04 PM by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
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Offline spacecane

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #9 on: 01/04/2015 12:43 PM »
Would somebody survive if they were inside the MLP during a launch?

Offline DaveS

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #10 on: 01/04/2015 12:49 PM »
Would somebody survive if they were inside the MLP during a launch?
No.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #11 on: 01/04/2015 03:01 PM »
Hey Dave,

I would have thought that you might know the answer to my question.

Now I would think of two more experts who could know, maybe padrat and possibly JayP. Maybe they come forward up yet, I would be very happy.

« Last Edit: 02/01/2015 01:01 PM by roma847 »
***************
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Manfred

Under construction:
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Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #12 on: 02/27/2015 10:32 PM »
Does anyone have technical drawings of the Rainbirds of the MLPs? For the dimensions of the two different types I have found different data.


Source: NASA

In NASA Facts online (SSWS) is written, that the rainbirds are 12' (3,7 m) high. The two in the center are 42'' (107 cm) in diameter, the other four have a 30'' (76 cm) diameter.

But in the MLP Report I have found, that all of the spray pipes have a height of 10'-6'' (3,2 m), which includes the 6' (1,83 m) diameter slanted hood at the top.
The two center pipes have a 4' (1,22 m) diameter. The other four pipes are smaller, with a diameter of only 2'-6'' (76 cm).

What information is correct now?

NASA drawings would be very helpful.

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
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Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #13 on: 04/27/2016 05:58 AM »
Hello everybody,
is there anybody, who has any idea of the purpose for this pipe on the central rainbird in the blast deck, and why the other rainbirds do not need it?


Source: NASA-Google Street View


Source: NASA

***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
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Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #14 on: 04/27/2016 06:39 PM »
I don't know the answer, but in the best NSF tradition, I can speculate... :)

My best speculation is that this pipe is a conduit for pressure and flow sensors mounted into this particular rainbird.  It seems the right size for being an armored conduit for the wiring from a sensor package.  It could also be used to pull water samples from the rainbird system, though I don't have any speculations as to why you would need water sampling from one end of the system.

The question would then be, why in the world would only one of the rainbirds be fitted out with such a sensor package?  Again, speculation is in order...

My first thought is that the rainbird in question is at the end of the plumbing run.  You could get overall system pressure and flow information from the valving that feeds the system, but you might want the rainbird at the end of the run to show a minimum level of pressure and flow; by inference, all of the rest of the rainbirds farther up the run would then be considered to have sufficient pressure and flow.  After all, you would then have measurements at both ends of the plumbing run.

If there is not a plumbing run -- i.e., if the rainbirds are fed from a single multi-plexing valve assembly that feeds each rainbird separately -- then perhaps they felt they only needed representative sensor data from one rainbird, from which they could extrapolate the performance of the rest.  Not as likely, I think, as a plumbing run, but still possible.

So -- those are my best WAG speculations.  If they help, wonderful.  If not, sorry to waste y'all's time... ;)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #15 on: 04/27/2016 10:15 PM »
Thanks Doug for your interesting brainstorming,
although we have no proof, but that would be conceivable explanatory approaches.

Perhaps padrat or JayP could know it more exactly?

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Manfred

Under construction:
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Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #16 on: 06/06/2016 01:21 PM »
Hello everybody,

does anyone know for what this wrapped round part was used?


Source: NASA

Here it is undisguised.


Source: NASA

Might this have been an interface for the booster ignition?

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Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #17 on: 03/06/2017 06:29 AM »
Hello everybody,

another question dealing with the colors of the Water Bags, maybe somebody knows it.

On older pictures like this here from STS-2, it looks as if they were uniformly red during the first missions.


Source: capcomespace.net

During later missions to the end of the shuttle program the water bags around the SRBs were yellow.


Source: NASA


Source: youtube.com

Does anyone know when and why the colors were changed?

BTW, whether these water bags at STS-6 were uniformly red too, I have unfortunately not yet been able to find out, but I strongly suspect it.

« Last Edit: 03/06/2017 09:59 AM by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline roma847

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Re: MLP Q&A
« Reply #18 on: 05/08/2017 02:59 PM »
Hello everybody,

is there anyone who knows wherefore such boxes were installed on both sides of the MLPs during early missions?


Source: NASA (STS-1)
Maybe these were water tanks (Firex?), because red pipes were installed on their right side?

Later they were removed, as one can see here on this image of STS-79 (1996). But since then, this new equipment (green marked) has appeared.


Source: NASA (STS-79)

Thanks in advance for your help.

« Last Edit: 05/08/2017 02:59 PM by roma847 »
***************
Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Tags: MLP SRB