Author Topic: LIVE: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes - August 30, 2012  (Read 86994 times)

Offline jacqmans

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July 31, 2006

Dwayne Brown/Erica Hupp
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1726/1237

RELEASE: 06-286

NASA SELECTS TEAMS FOR SPACE WEATTHER MISSION AND STUDIES

Four university teams will share $100 million to provide experiments
and supporting hardware for a future NASA mission to study near-Earth
space radiation. This type of radiation is hazardous to astronauts,
orbiting satellites and aircraft flying high altitude polar routes.

The teams will initially use $4.2 million to perform a one-year cost,
management and technical study prior to assembling and testing their
scientific payload for the mission. The anticipated lifetime cost of
payload development is $96 million.

Called the Radiation Belt Storm Probes, the two-spacecraft mission is
scheduled for launch in 2012. The mission will study how
accumulations of space radiation form and change during space storms.
Space weather storms involve constantly changing magnetic and
electric fields and gusts of radiation particles that produce intense
energy. This energy can black out long-distance communications over
entire continents and disrupt the global navigational system.

"This research will provide information to aid those working in this
environment to respond proactively to space radiation events, rather
than reactively," said NASA's Heliophysics Division director Dick
Fisher.

NASA also has selected three teams to share approximately $2.3 million
to conduct studies for small missions that will augment the 2012
mission. NASA will review the studies and select one investigation
for continued development.

Proposals for the 2012 mission and studies were submitted to NASA in
response to an Announcement of Opportunity released in August 2005.
Selected teams and experiments for the 2012 mission:

- Boston Univ., Boston; directly measure the near-Earth space
radiation particles to determine the physical processes that produce
radiation enhancements and loss

- University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; understand the origin of plasma
waves that energize space particles to radiation levels; measure the
distortions to Earth's magnetic field that control the structure of
the planet's radiation belts

- University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; study electric fields in space
that energize radiation particles and modify the structure of the
inner magnetosphere

- New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, N.J.; determine how
space weather creates what is called the "storm time ring current"
around Earth and determine how that ring current supplies and
supports the creation of radiation populations

Selected teams for studies and areas of research to augment the 2012
mission:

- University of Colorado at Boulder, Colo.; a potential U.S.
contribution of scientific instrumentation for a Canadian scientific
satellite

- University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.; measure the response
of the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere to space weather forces

- Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H.; seek to discover the mechanisms
that cause the Earth's radiation belts to periodically drain away
into the planet's atmosphere

The National Reconnaissance Office, Chantilly, Va., plans to enhance
the mission's scientific goals by contributing an experiment to
gather additional data that will better characterize the radiation
environment in space. The experiment will extend the measurement
capabilities to a range beyond what was originally planned for the
mission.

These investigations and the Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission are
part of NASA's Living with a Star Program. The program is designed to
understand how and why the sun varies, how planetary systems respond
and the effect on human space and Earth activities.
The program is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center,
Greenbelt, Md., for the agency's Heliophysics Division of the Science
Mission Directorate.

For more information on NASA's Living with a Star Geospace Program,
visit:

http://www.lws.nasa.gov/geospace

For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/home


-end-
« Last Edit: 08/27/2012 05:54 PM by input~2 »

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re:A tlas V - Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #1 on: 05/30/2012 11:30 AM »
Quote
The Centaur upper stage is moved into the Atlas Spaceflight Operations Center, or ASOC, to begin checkout for the launch of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes, or RBSP, mission

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
« Last Edit: 06/20/2012 08:52 PM by Ronsmytheiii »
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Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Atlas V - Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #2 on: 06/20/2012 07:59 PM »
catching up with the images:

Quote
In the clean room high bay at the Astrotech payload processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians prepare to clean and inspect Radiation Belt Storm Probes A and B. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes, or RBSP, mission will help us understand the sun’s influence on Earth and near-Earth space by studying the Earth’s radiation belts on various scales of space and time. RBSP will begin its mission of exploration of Earth's Van Allen radiation belts and the extremes of space weather after its launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket.

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
« Last Edit: 06/20/2012 08:52 PM by Ronsmytheiii »
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Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Atlas V - Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #3 on: 06/20/2012 08:02 PM »
and arrival of the 1st stage on the Delta Mariner and then transport to Atlas Spaceflight Operations Center

Great time for EELV operations  8)
« Last Edit: 06/20/2012 08:52 PM by Ronsmytheiii »
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Atlas V - Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #4 on: 06/20/2012 08:42 PM »
Just so I have this correct, the top picture is from inside the Delta Mariner and the other is inside the Atlas Spaceflight Operations Center. I have actually never seen any pictures from inside the Delta Mariner before. Cool shots.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2012 08:52 PM by Ronsmytheiii »
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Offline Lurker Steve

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #5 on: 06/20/2012 10:36 PM »
I see the centaur that arrives earlier is off on the right side of the bottom picture.

How big is the ASOC ? How many cores / missions can they work on at the same time ?

Offline Jim

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #6 on: 06/20/2012 11:34 PM »
I see the centaur that arrives earlier is off on the right side of the bottom picture.

How big is the ASOC ? How many cores / missions can they work on at the same time ?


they can have 3 missions in flow. 
VIF
ASOC Ordnance bay
ASOC High bay

There is no need for more room in the high bay for more cores, they only spend a short time there, but it can hold 3 for a Heavy.

Offline Prober

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Re: Atlas V - Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #7 on: 06/21/2012 01:33 AM »
and arrival of the 1st stage on the Delta Mariner and then transport to Atlas Spaceflight Operations Center

Great time for EELV operations  8)

now these are some special kinda pics.......
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #8 on: 06/28/2012 10:23 AM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M12-121

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA ACCREDITATION NOW OPEN FOR NASA'S RBSP LAUNCH

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Media accreditation is open for the launch of
NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission. Liftoff is
scheduled for 4:08 a.m. EDT, Thursday, Aug. 23, aboard an Atlas V
rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force
Station, Fla.

The two-year RBSP mission will help scientists develop an
understanding of Earth's Van Allen radiation belts and related
regions that pose hazards to human and robotic explorers.

International news media who want to cover the RBSP launch must apply
for accreditation by 5 p.m., July 18. NASA and the U.S. Air Force
require international media to apply for accreditation at least 30
days in advance of the scheduled launch. U.S. media also may begin
their application process at this time. All news media must use the
online accreditation system at:

https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

International media are required to provide their full legal name,
date of birth, nationality, passport number and media affiliation.
Two forms of legal identification are required upon arrival at
Kennedy. At least one form must be legal photo identification, such
as a passport or driver's license.

International media with questions about accreditation should contact:

Jennifer Horner
NASA Public Affairs Office
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
321-867-6598 or 321-867-2468
jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov

RBSP will use twin probes to explore space weather -- changes in
Earth's space environment caused by the sun -- that can disable
satellites, create power grid failures and disrupt GPS service. The
mission also will allow researchers to understand fundamental
radiation and particle acceleration processes throughout the
universe.

The RBSP is part of NASA's Living with a Star Program, which is
managed by the agency's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel,
Md., built the pair of RBSP spacecraft and will manage the mission
for NASA. The Launch Services Program at Kennedy is responsible for
launch management. United Launch Alliance is the provider of the
Atlas V launch service.

For more information about the RBSP mission, visit:

http:www.nasa.gov/rbsp

Offline spectre9

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #9 on: 06/29/2012 12:50 AM »
I enjoyed this little radio piece.

http://www.npr.org/2012/06/25/155719933/twin-probes-to-investigate-mysteries-of-space-weather

These little spacecraft must be very tough.

Video of spacecraft testing here.

http://rbsp.jhuapl.edu/newscenter/intheloop/2012_0530.php

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #10 on: 07/03/2012 06:08 PM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M12-123

NASA ANNOUNCES EVENT FOR SOCIAL MEDIA FOLLOWERS AT RBSP LAUNCH

WASHINGTON -- NASA invites its social media followers to a two-day
NASA Social on Aug. 22-23, at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in
Florida for the launch of NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)
mission.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the
agency through Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks.
This event is expected to culminate in the launch of the twin RBSP
spacecraft, currently targeted for 4:08 a.m. EDT, Thursday, Aug. 23
aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket.

Registration for the NASA Social opens at noon Thursday, July 5, and
closes at noon Monday, July 9. Fifty participants will be selected
from online registrations. Because portions of this event may take
place in restricted areas, registration is limited to U.S. citizens.

Participants will have unique behind the scenes experiences with NASA,
which they are encouraged to share with others through their favorite
social networks. Guests will view the launch, tour facilities at
Kennedy, speak with representatives from NASA and the Applied Physics
Laboratory, view the RBSP launch pad, meet fellow space enthusiasts
who are active on social media and meet members of NASA's launch
services and social media teams.

The RBSP mission uses two identical spacecraft built by the Johns
Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. Designed
for a two-year primary science mission in orbit around Earth, RBSP
will provide insight into our planet's radiation belts and help
scientists predict changes in this critical region of space.

For more information on the NASA Social and to register, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/social

To find all the ways to connect and collaborate with NASA, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/connect

To learn more about RBSP, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/rbsp


Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #12 on: 07/10/2012 10:07 PM »
Quote
Inside the Astrotech payload processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians deploy the solar arrays and magnetometer boom of the Radiation Belt Storm Probes, or RBSP, spacecraft A.

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
« Last Edit: 07/10/2012 10:08 PM by Ronsmytheiii »
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #13 on: 07/13/2012 05:23 PM »
From KSC facebook:

Today the United Launch Alliance Atlas V first stage booster for
 NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission was hoisted into position in the
 Vertical Integration Facility at Launch Complex 41. The Centaur upper stage
 will follow on Monday. At Astrotech, Probe B of the RBSP spacecraft is
 undergoing solar array integration and testing.

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #14 on: 07/19/2012 08:25 PM »
"Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." - Robert Goddard

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #15 on: 07/21/2012 03:22 PM »
and now the Centaur Upperstage is at the pad:
"Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." - Robert Goddard

Offline Prober

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« Last Edit: 07/21/2012 08:47 PM by Prober »
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Offline Jim

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #17 on: 07/21/2012 04:46 PM »
and now the Centaur Upperstage is at the pad:

Actually, it is at SLC-41.  The pad is behind the fence

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #18 on: 07/25/2012 01:59 AM »
Centaur stacked on the core stage:

The LUT looks like it could use some maintenance....

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4
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Offline WHAP

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Re: Atlas V 401- Radiation Belt Storm Probes- August 23, 2012
« Reply #19 on: 07/25/2012 02:18 PM »
Centaur stacked on the core stage:

The LUT looks like it could use some maintenance....

http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4

What's an LUT?  Not to be a stickler, but Atlas at CCAFS has a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) on which the vehicle is stacked.  That stacking is done at the Vertical Integration Facility (VIF).  There are probably a number of other acronyms, but these are the most relevant for these events.
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