Author Topic: EDRS Development and Deployment  (Read 7105 times)

Offline sdsds

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EDRS Development and Deployment
« on: 09/05/2014 07:30 PM »
As I understand it, ESA's European Data Relay System (EDRS) will use lasers to send data from Earth observation satellites to satellites in GEO, which will then relay that data to the ground. The payload for this, on either the data-collecting satellite or the GEO relay satellite, is called a Laser Communication Terminal (LCT). Sentinel 1A has an LCT and Alphasat has a demonstration relay payload. But the link between them has apparently not yet been tested. According to  Peter B. de Selding, Sentinel 1A might not, "complete its proof-of-concept campaign with Alphasat until the end of the year."
http://www.spacenews.com/article/civil-space/41767esa-members-defer-funding-guarantee-for-airbus-backed-data-relay-system

Are the other concerns expressed in that article valid? Is EDRS development and deployment still pretty much on track?
« Last Edit: 09/05/2014 07:31 PM by sdsds »
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Offline sdsds

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #1 on: 12/03/2014 05:56 PM »
It isn't exactly about the payload, but thought the article should be linked here too.

Space News link....

Quote
Airbus Negotiating SpaceX Launch for ESA-supported Laser Relay Satellite

PARIS — Airbus Defence and Space is negotiating with SpaceX for a late-2016 launch of the European Space Agency’s European Data Relay System (EDRS) program’s second geostationary-orbit satellite designed to commercialize laser communications links worldwide.
>

As regards testing, the article says,
Quote
For EDRS, Airbus, ESA and the executive commission of the 28-nation European Union on Nov. 27 celebrated the successful laser communications link between the AlphaSat satellite in geostationary orbit and the Sentinel 1A Earth observation satellite in low Earth orbit.

Evert Dudok, head of Airbus Defence and Space’s Communications, Intelligence and Security division, said that as of Nov. 27 about 14 such links had been successfully demonstrated.
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Offline Runerdieker

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #2 on: 12/04/2014 02:49 PM »
This test makes me curious: is the EDRS for laser commiunication in any way interoperable with the system NASA tested with LADEE? Because LADEE had a link to a groundstation in Spain (and to two American groundstations). Has there been any international cooperation on a standard?
On the ESA-website in the article about the LADEE-test was written:
Quote
In addition, DLR, the German Aerospace Center, has developed satellite-to-satellite laser communication terminals embarked as technological demonstration payload on the Alphasat mission. ESA plans to use the optical communication terminal developed by Germany as the main operational payload for its European Data Relay System missions
.
In the article of the current test there is only talk about groundstations in Europe:
Quote
Orbiting from pole to pole about 700 km up, Sentinel-1A transmits data to Earth routinely, but only when it passes over its ground stations in Europe. However, geostationary satellites, hovering 36 000 km above Earth, have their ground stations in permanent view so they can stream data to Earth all the time.

Offline bolun

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #3 on: 01/27/2015 01:49 PM »
N° 2–2015: ESA AND AIRBUS TO DECIDE ON THE ROUTE TO PROCEED WITH EDRS COMPLETION.

26 January 2015

Following intense work during the past weeks between all partners involved with the EDRS programme, in particular the European Commission, ESA and Airbus, the business prospects of EDRS have been consolidated.

Based upon this consolidation, ESA fully intends to continue with the deployment of the entire EDRS programme, along with all the partners concerned, including the launch of the EDRS-C satellite.

A meeting is now planned on 28 January between the two main partners, ESA and Airbus, to decide on the way to proceed with the completion of the EDRS programme.

The EDRS infrastructure is made up of two space nodes and the related ground segment :

The first of the two EDRS payloads (EDRS-A) will be carried on the Eutelsat-EB9B satellite, starting operations in 2015, and being built by Airbus Defense and Space.

The second EDRS payload, as well as the Hylas-3 payload from Avanti Communications of London, will be flown on the EDRS-C satellite. This satellite is being built by OHB System AG of Bremen, Germany.

EDRS is  a strategic asset for Europe, a new space data highway to relay large volumes of data very quickly so that information from Earth-observing missions can be even more readily available.

About the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) provides Europe’s gateway to space.

ESA is an intergovernmental organisation, created in 1975, with the mission to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.

ESA has 20 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, of whom 18 are Member States of the EU. Two other Member States of the EU, Hungary and Estonia, are likely soon to become new ESA Member States.

ESA has Cooperation Agreements with six other Member States of the EU. Canada takes part in some ESA programmes under a Cooperation Agreement.

ESA is also working with the EU on implementing the Galileo and Copernicus programmes.

By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, ESA can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

ESA develops the launchers, spacecraft and ground facilities needed to keep Europe at the forefront of global space activities.

Today, it develops and launches satellites for Earth observation, navigation, telecommunications and astronomy, sends probes to the far reaches of the Solar System and cooperates in the human exploration of space.

Learn more about ESA at www.esa.int

For further information:

ESA Media Relations Office
Email: media@esa.int
Tel: +33 1 53 69 72 99

http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/ESA_and_Airbus_to_decide_on_the_route_to_proceed_with_EDRS_completion

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #4 on: 01/27/2015 02:17 PM »
I'm not well versed to EU bureaucratic lingo,  so does it mean that the meeting above shows that EDRS still requires more moolah input from the ESA member states?  ::)
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline bolun

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #5 on: 01/31/2015 12:51 PM »
N° 4–2015: ESA AND AIRBUS DS CONFIRM PARTNERSHIP TO COMPLETE THE FULL EUROPEAN DATA RELAY SYSTEM

30 January 2015

This decision follows the successful test campaign of the first multigigabit optical intersatellite link between the Copernicus Sentinel-1A and Alphasat satellites. This campaign, a precursor of the European Data Relay System, or EDRS, has paved the way for an entirely new approach of delivering data, with space systems becoming part of the global Big Data challenge.

The EDRS system consists of the first payload, EDRS-A, to be launched by mid-2015 on the Eutelsat-9B satellite, followed by a satellite, EDRS-C. The EDRS-C satellite, based on a SmallGEO platform from OHB Systems AG, will also carry Avanti’s HYLAS-3 telecommunications payload.

EDRS’ unique features include a bidirectional optical intersatellite link operating at 1.8 Gbit/s, based on the Laser Communication Terminal developed by TESAT in Germany under funding from DLR German Aerospace Center, a bidirectional Ka-band link offering a bandwidth of 300 MHz, on EDRS-A, as well as a 1.8 Gbit/s feeder link to the ground.

The positioning of the two EDRS payloads on the geostationary arc offers near-realtime transmission of, for example, Earth observation images to the ground at unprecedented speeds. 

About the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) provides Europe’s gateway to space.

ESA is an intergovernmental organisation, created in 1975, with the mission to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.

ESA has 20 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, of whom 18 are Member States of the EU. Two other Member States of the EU, Hungary and Estonia, are likely soon to become new ESA Member States.

ESA has Cooperation Agreements with six other Member States of the EU. Canada takes part in some ESA programmes under a Cooperation Agreement.

ESA is also working with the EU on implementing the Galileo and Copernicus programmes.

By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, ESA can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

ESA develops the launchers, spacecraft and ground facilities needed to keep Europe at the forefront of global space activities.

Today, it develops and launches satellites for Earth observation, navigation, telecommunications and astronomy, sends probes to the far reaches of the Solar System and cooperates in the human exploration of space.

Learn more about ESA at www.esa.int

For further information:

ESA Media Relations Office
Email: media@esa.int
Tel: +33 1 5369 7299

http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/ESA_and_Airbus_DS_confirm_
partnership_to_complete_the_full_European_Data_Relay_System
« Last Edit: 06/05/2015 01:10 PM by Chris Bergin »

Offline bolun

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #6 on: 06/05/2015 12:54 PM »
Laser communication terminal

The European Data Relay System laser communication terminals are capable of transmitting 1.8 Gbit/s of data between between lower orbits and geostationary orbit. The technology was developed by the DLR German Space Center and TESAT-Spacecom (DE) and is the most advanced of its kind.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/06/Laser_communication_terminal

Image credit: DLR/TESAT

Offline bolun

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #7 on: 07/01/2015 02:29 PM »

Offline bolun

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #8 on: 12/11/2015 08:28 AM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Telecommunications_Integrated_Applications/EDRS/EDRS-A_and_its_laser_are_ready_to_fly

Quote
After a year-long wait in storage for a Proton rocket to become available, the EDRS-A laser communications payload and its Eutelsat host satellite are finally at the Baikonur cosmodrome and being prepared for launch in late January.

EDRS-A is the first element of the European Data Relay System, which will collect information from low-orbiting satellites via laser and send it down to Earth in near-real time. It was packed into an Antonov plane by Airbus Toulouse, France and flown to Kazakhstan in November.

The Eutelsat-9B/EDRS-A satellite has undergone a plethora of tests to make sure it is space-ready after its journey.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #9 on: 12/13/2015 11:40 PM »
ESA EDRS laser communications satellite. This typical GEO satellite communicates to LEO earth observation satellites (ESA Sentinel  initiatially) via laser communications at upto 1.8Gbs. The GEO satellite then forwards data to earth ground stations using Ka band microwave at 300Mbs.

Once a few GEO EDRS satellites are in place, one will always be within view of a LEO satellite. This would allow the LEO satellite to download data at any time assuming the EDRS has a free laser terminal.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/12/13/esa-laser-ready-fly/ http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/12/13/esa-laser-ready-fly/

With a GEO EDRS constellation ESA are building the equivalent of a high-speed  fibre network in space.

NB downlink to earth stations is microwave as it can operate through cloud.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #10 on: 12/15/2015 01:42 PM »
One possible use of this system is for drone communications. I saw a Netflix doco on drones recently where they are developing a video camera that can video a whole small city with resolution to follow a single person. This video allowed you to go back in time and track movements of any person or car. Great for tracking terrorist movements, especially the ones that planted a bomb. With EDRS it would give up to minute data, not hours old as case is with waiting for drone to land and physically offload its data.

The plan is to develop terminals small enough for cubesats. An earth observation cubesat taking 10MB photos every second could download an hour (36GB) of photos in 3minutes at 1.8Gbs. One GEO EDRS satellite could service dozens cubesats at these data rates.




Offline bolun

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #11 on: 02/01/2016 11:03 AM »
N° 2–2016: FIRST SPACEDATAHIGHWAY LASER RELAY IN ORBIT

29 January 2016

The European Data Relay System’s first laser terminal has reached space aboard its host satellite and is now under way to its final operating position.
EDRS-A was launched on 29 January as part of the Eutelsat-9B telecom satellite at 22:20 GMT (23:20 CET, 04:20 30 January local time) atop a Proton rocket from Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

The satellite was released at 07:32 GMT today, around 36 000 km over the equator, and is now moving towards its final geostationary position at 9°E over Europe, where it will be operated by Eutelsat.

EDRS is ESA’s most ambitious telecom programme yet, taking the form of a public–private partnership between ESA and Airbus Defence and Space, with Airbus operating the service and the DLR German Space Administration funding the development of the  laser terminal.

Dubbed the ‘SpaceDataHighway’, EDRS will revolutionise satcoms as Europe’s first optical communication network, capable of relaying user data in near-real time at an unprecedented 1.8 Gbit/s.

Normally, low-orbiting satellites must come within view of a ground station before they can send their information to Earth.

EDRS instead collects their information from its higher, geo-stationary position via laser and immediately relays it to the ground, dramatically improving access to time-critical and potentially life-saving data.

ESA, Airbus and DLR will in a few days begin testing EDRS-A’s general health and performance, working with the EDRS ground stations in Germany, Belgium and the UK.

Test links to its first customers, the European Commission’s Copernicus Sentinel satellites, will then be carried out over several weeks for the service to begin this summer. Data relay for the International Space Station will start in 2018.

Completing the system

The second EDRS node, the dedicated EDRS-C satellite, will be launched next year to join EDRS-A over Europe. A third is planned in 2020 over the Asia-Pacific region, doubling the system’s coverage.

Learn more about EDRS at www.esa.int/EDRS

http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/First_SpaceDataHighway_laser_relay_in_orbit

Offline savuporo

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #12 on: 04/26/2016 03:23 AM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Telecommunications_Integrated_Applications/EDRS/EDRS-A_testing_the_waters

15 April 2016

EDRS-A, Europe’s SpaceDataHighway pioneer, has been in orbit for a month and its testing is going well. The Redu team in Belgium are now pushing it ever-closer to full service by laying the groundwork for it to be ready for its first laser links to the Copernicus Sentinels.

The European Data Relay System’s EDRS-A node was launched on 29 January as a hosted payload aboard Eutelsat’s Eutelsat-9B satellite. As the establishing stone of the SpaceDataHighway network, it is extremely important that the payload is in good health.

Testing began two weeks after the Eutelsat satellite was launched and while it was still travelling towards its final position at 9°E, over Europe.

....

Before EDRS-A starts establishing test links to Sentinels-1A and -2A in April, the payload must first check the accuracy of its laser by making contact with an ESA ground station in the Canary Islands.

This ‘illumination test’ will prove the terminal is capable of locking onto a target over 36 000 km away – a feat that will become routine once it starts operations in June.

As the Sentinels orbit Earth, EDRS-A’s laser will locate and lock on to their partner terminals. The Sentinels will send the information they have collected via the laser. EDRS-A’s Ka-band payload will then send it down to Europe, where the Ottobrunn Mission Operation Centre will measure the duration of the link and speed of the data transmission. The centre will compare the results with that of a similar terminal on Alphasat, as well as the data the Sentinels are downlinking via their own ground station network.

The test links between the satellites are crucial, as they will be used to verify the health of the payload as well as set the standard for all future links.

Magali Vaissiere said: “EDRS is the most ambitious satcom programme ever carried out under an ESA partnership with the European space sector. It takes on board the most sophisticated communications technology in the world. We look forward to it being fully operational this summer, marking a new chapter for global telecommunications.”



Wondering when the first test links will happen ?
« Last Edit: 04/26/2016 03:29 AM by savuporo »
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Online jacqmans

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #13 on: 06/01/2016 06:22 PM »
ESA HQ, 1 June 2016

Europe's SpaceDataHighway relays first Sentinel-1 images via laser- 

ESA today unveiled the first Sentinel-1 satellite images sent via the European Data Relay System's world-leading laser technology in high orbit. 

The two images were taken by the radar on the Copernicus Sentinel-1A over La Reunion Island and its coastal area. The first was scanned in a high-resolution mode, the second in a wide-swath mode that provides broad coverage
of surrounding waters, and used in particular for maritime surveillance. 

Sentinel-1A, sweeping around the globe at 28 000 km/h, transmitted the images to the EDRS-A node in geostationary orbit via a laser beam at 600 Mbit/s. The laser terminal is capable of working at 1.8 Gbit/s, allowing EDRS to
relay up to 50 TB a day. EDRS immediately beamed the data down to Europe.   

The transfer between the two satellites was fully automated: EDRS connected to Sentinel from more than 35 000 km away, locking on to the laser terminal and holding that link until transmission was completed. 

The German Space Operations Center in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany, tasked by the Mission Operating Center of Airbus Defence and Space in Ottobrunn, received the raw Sentinel-1A data at its station in Weilheim, Germany. They were
then passed to the ESA-managed Sentinel-1 ground segment, where they were processed to generate the final products.

EDRS will dramatically improve access to more urgent and potentially life-saving coverage from space than ever before. 

Satellites like the Sentinels can help to survey areas struck by natural disasters. When the situation on the ground is changing rapidly, hours-old satellite information is of little use to rescue teams. EDRS will allow access
to time-critical data acquired around the world. 

EDRS will help in disaster relief as well as for operational monitoring services like maritime surveillance by relaying the data as quickly as possible to Europe, thanks to its network of ground stations like the one in Oberpfaffenhofen.

Magali Vaissiere, ESA Director of Telecommunications and Integrated Applications, said at the Berlin Airshow today, "With today's first link, EDRS is close to becoming operational, providing services to the Copernicus Sentinel
Satellites for the European Commission. 

"EDRS is the world's first laser relay service and features technologies developed by European industry."

Volker Liebig, ESA Director of Earth Observation Programmes, stated: "The Sentinels are the anchor customer of the new commercial EDRS service and the Copernicus system wins new downlink flexibility. So we have a real win-win
situation."

"SpaceDataHighway is no longer science fiction," noted Evert Dudok of Airbus Defence and Space. "It will revolutionise satellite communications, and help to keep Europe's space industry at the forefront of technology and innovative
services."

For Sentinel-1, EDRS adds flexibility, increasing the availability of products to users. It will also allow fast downlink of data acquired outside of Europe, helping services requiring products in real time, as well as in emergency
and crisis situations. 

The SpaceDataHighway is a public-private partnership between ESA and Airbus Defence and Space. The DLR German Aerospace Center funded the development of the cutting-edge laser technology that forms the backbone of the system.

The first node, EDRS-A, was launched on 29 January 2016 as a hosted payload on the Eutelsat-9B satellite. The second, the dedicated EDRS-C satellite, will be launched in 2017.

The European Commission's Copernicus Sentinel satellites are the first users of the EDRS service.

ESA is planning the GlobeNet programme to extend EDRS by 2020, providing additional security services to satellites, aircraft and drones. 

The laser communication technology used today will be able to bridge up to 75 000 km, sending data from one node over the Asia-Pacific region (EDRS-D) to another over Europe (either EDRS-A or EDRS-C). This global coverage will
provide quasi-realtime services around the world linking instantaneously back to Europe. 

Offline bolun

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Re: EDRS Development and Deployment
« Reply #15 on: 04/17/2017 12:19 PM »
EDRS-C being tested

EDRS-C is put through its paces at OHB System AG in Bremen, Germany, on 7 April.

EDRS-C is the second node of the European Data Relay System and first dedicated satellite to complement the infrastructure. It is the second satellite to be based on ESA and OHB’s SmallGEO platform.

The European Data Relay System is designed to transmit data between low Earth orbiting satellites and the EDRS payloads in geostationary orbit using innovative laser communication technology. By relaying their findings to Europe via EDRS, Earth-observing satellites can transmit their information to the ground in near-realtime as they gather it, instead of having to store it onboard until they travel over one of their own ground stations.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/04/EDRS-C_being_tested3

Image credit: OHB System AG

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