Author Topic: Interorbital Systems Flights  (Read 27666 times)

Offline ringsider

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #80 on: 10/12/2016 03:07 PM »
Lets post an actual Interorbital update ( or rather, non-update as these things usually are )

www.satnews.com/story.php?number=60112970
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According to IOS, by mid-2017/early 2018, the firm will initiate launch services for smallsats to a circular, polar orbit at 310 km altitude. Their current manifest numbers 135 smallsats awaiting launch.

The first flight date was early 2016 six months ago or so.

I honestly don't know whether to laugh or just sit here with my mouth gaping open wondering what the hell it is I just read.

Online savuporo

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #81 on: 10/18/2016 12:17 AM »
http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-18/aerospace-company-interorbital-systems-eyes-rockhampton-site/7926296
US aerospace company Interorbital Systems eyes Rockhampton as place to set up launch pad
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The company's first commercial flight is scheduled for next year.

"We're going through licensing now and we should be fully operational for orbital launches sometime in the second quarter of 2017," Ms Milliron said.
...
Government support needed

Member for Capricornia Michelle Landry met with Mr Moody in Rockhampton recently and said she would discuss the proposal with Minister for Innovation Greg Hunt in Canberra in the coming week.

"It's a very exciting idea and I was really interested to hear about it," she said.

But Ms Landry admitted she was concerned about the viability of the proposal.

"On paper it sounds excellent, but I'm not an expert in these things, so I do need to seek advice on it," she said.[/b]
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Offline CameronD

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #82 on: 10/18/2016 03:10 AM »
http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-18/aerospace-company-interorbital-systems-eyes-rockhampton-site/7926296
US aerospace company Interorbital Systems eyes Rockhampton as place to set up launch pad

Interesting find!!! Rockhampton.. Seriously!?!! April Fool's day is next year!  :o

Although I wish them all success, personally, I think they've been standing in the sun too long:
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Mr Moody said his Moody Space Centre proposal was in its infancy and required $25 million in government funding..
« Last Edit: 10/18/2016 03:12 AM by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline ringsider

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #83 on: 10/18/2016 07:38 AM »
Government support needed

Not a hope in hell.

Online savuporo

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #84 on: 10/18/2016 04:02 PM »
Government support needed

Not a hope in hell.

You are telling me there is a chance ?
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"It's a very exciting idea and I was really interested to hear about it," she said.

But Ms Landry admitted she was concerned about the viability of the proposal.

"On paper it sounds excellent, but I'm not an expert in these things, so I do need to seek advice on it," she said.

If that doesn't work out, there is always Tonga
« Last Edit: 10/18/2016 04:04 PM by savuporo »
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Online savuporo

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #85 on: 10/18/2016 04:08 PM »
Just to be sure, i'm not pulling anyone's legs.

http://spacenews.com/californias-interorbital-has-big-plans-small-satellites/
Feb, 2010

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To further limit launch costs, Interorbital Systems plans to operate its own spaceport in the South Pacific nation of Tonga. In January, Tonga’s King George Tupou V approved plans for the spaceport, according to the Tongan national news magazine Matangi Tonga. Now, Interorbital Systems and Tongan government officials are working with the Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation to obtain a U.S. license for the Neptune 30 launch, Randa Milliron said.

In late summer, Interorbital Systems plans to begin building the launch pad for the Neptune 30, which is scheduled to be completed in time to support an orbital launch in December. “We are creating a very minimal infrastructure,” Randa Milliron said. “A lot of the equipment is portable.”
« Last Edit: 10/18/2016 04:08 PM by savuporo »
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Offline CameronD

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #86 on: 10/20/2016 12:25 AM »
Just to be sure, i'm not pulling anyone's legs.

http://spacenews.com/californias-interorbital-has-big-plans-small-satellites/
Feb, 2010

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To further limit launch costs, Interorbital Systems plans to operate its own spaceport in the South Pacific nation of Tonga. In January, Tonga’s King George Tupou V approved plans for the spaceport, according to the Tongan national news magazine Matangi Tonga. Now, Interorbital Systems and Tongan government officials are working with the Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation to obtain a U.S. license for the Neptune 30 launch, Randa Milliron said.

In late summer, Interorbital Systems plans to begin building the launch pad for the Neptune 30, which is scheduled to be completed in time to support an orbital launch in December. “We are creating a very minimal infrastructure,” Randa Milliron said. “A lot of the equipment is portable.”

Tonga makes more sense than Queensland (unfortunately) but of course, being in the center of approximately nowhere, will suffer from the same remoteness issues that Kwajalein Atoll does although Kwajalein at least had some form of launch pad and radar range before SpaceX moved in.

Still and all, the remoteness didn't stop SpaceX.. so no reason it should stop these guys.

« Last Edit: 10/20/2016 12:26 AM by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #87 on: 10/20/2016 09:24 AM »
Just to be sure, i'm not pulling anyone's legs.

http://spacenews.com/californias-interorbital-has-big-plans-small-satellites/
Feb, 2010

Quote
To further limit launch costs, Interorbital Systems plans to operate its own spaceport in the South Pacific nation of Tonga. In January, Tonga’s King George Tupou V approved plans for the spaceport, according to the Tongan national news magazine Matangi Tonga. Now, Interorbital Systems and Tongan government officials are working with the Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation to obtain a U.S. license for the Neptune 30 launch, Randa Milliron said.

In late summer, Interorbital Systems plans to begin building the launch pad for the Neptune 30, which is scheduled to be completed in time to support an orbital launch in December. “We are creating a very minimal infrastructure,” Randa Milliron said. “A lot of the equipment is portable.”

Tonga makes more sense than Queensland (unfortunately) but of course, being in the center of approximately nowhere, will suffer from the same remoteness issues that Kwajalein Atoll does although Kwajalein at least had some form of launch pad and radar range before SpaceX moved in.

Still and all, the remoteness didn't stop SpaceX.. so no reason it should stop these guys.

Nothing stopping them... for the last five years.  That pad in Tonga was supposed to support a launch in December 2010. Interorbital has been about a year from launch for over a decade now.

Actually, selling extremely low priced launches that are then indefinitely delayed may not be all bad for educational satellites. The students still get experience building hardware, and by the time the launch date passes, they're likely to have already graduated and gone on to get a job somewhere.

Online savuporo

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #88 on: 01/04/2017 03:49 AM »
http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2017/0102-randa-milliron-interorbital.html

CEO Randa Milliron introduces us to Interorbital Systems, which wants to put your payload in orbit for as little as $8,000. Can they do it?


Betteridge's law of headlines ..
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Online savuporo

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #89 on: 03/11/2017 05:30 PM »
http://triblive.com/local/allegheny/11950213-74/milliron-moon-launch

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Astrobotic, a Carnegie Mellon University spinoff company headquartered in the Strip District, bowed out of the competition in December when CEO John Thornton said the company would not be ready for a 2017 launch. Thornton doubted any team would land on the moon in 2017.

"He's a dropout," Randa Milliron said of Thornton quitting the competition and criticized him for disparaging the work of the other teams. "He knows nothing about how we're doing."

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Interorbital has four high-profile launches. The company will test its guidance system this spring with a suborbital launch that will carry 11 small satellites payloads. The Millirons hope their first orbital flight will be in late summer.
In the third quarter of this year, Interorbital will launch its Lunar Bullet mission, a rocket shot directly at the moon and aimed to slam into the lunar surface. The company's XPRIZE launch will happen by the end of the year, Milliron hopes. A NEPTUNE 8 rocket will fly to the moon, launch a lander that will deploy a rover to roll across the surface, snap a few photos and maybe some video, and win the $20 million Google Lunar XPRIZE in the process.

But even that, Milliron said, is a test.

"Everything we're doing is a test launch for the next phase," she said.

The company has two more moon missions planned for 2018, one that will return samples from the moon to Earth.
« Last Edit: 03/11/2017 05:33 PM by savuporo »
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Online savuporo

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #90 on: 04/18/2017 05:37 AM »
And yet again, Randa Milliron will present at another conference. Interplanetary Smallsat conf, May 1-2, San Jose.

http://www.intersmallsatconference.com/ISSC2017-booklet.pdf

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Interorbital Systems NEPTUNE modular rocket series: N3; N5; and N8 LUNA; and IOS Personal Satellite Kits will fill those needs. For example, the N5 is designed to launch 24 picosats at a time, for as little as $8,000 each, or from $1.5 million for a single dedicated 30-kg payload capacity. The popularity of this new service is evidenced by Interorbital’s current orbital launch manifest of 137 picosats for upcom-ing sold-out LEO Missions I-V. Flight-testing continues with orbital launches beginning summer of 2017, plus two Q4 Moon missions: Lunar Bullet and Google Lunar X PRIZE
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Online savuporo

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #91 on: 04/18/2017 05:43 AM »
Oh there's also an update on the website

http://interorbital.com/interorbital_06222015_018.htm
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In addition, the analysis and simulation for the three-stage NEPTUNE 1 (N1) has been completed. The N1 is composed of a single CPM 2.0 and two liquid upper-stages. It will be capable of placing a 10 pound (4.5 kg) payload into a 192 mi (310 km) polar orbit---perfect for the dedicated launch of the new 3U-CubeSat plus 1U-propulsion system assemblies now trending in the small satellite industry. Since the N1 launch vehicle is 36 ft (11 m) in length and weighs only 5,400 lbs (2,449 kg), it will be the smallest orbital launch vehicle in the world. The NEPTUNE 1 will also be the world's lowest-cost orbital launch vehicle, with a base price of $250,000 per launch to a circular polar orbit at 310km.
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Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Interorbital Systems Flights
« Reply #92 on: 04/19/2017 05:06 PM »
Not holding my breath, but at least I see new hardware coming together in the garage...
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