Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018  (Read 19373 times)

Offline Dante80

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - GPSIIIA-2 - SLC-40 - May 2018
« Reply #60 on: 05/03/2016 07:24 PM »
So will USAF have to watch how SpaceX does the first GPS-III before they will award any other competitive launches?

That's not what I said btw. I said that they need more confidence before assigning something much more important to the LV. SpaceX will bid all competitive launches, what they will get though depends partly on this (especially since the contract details and the scoring procedure might change from one payload to the other).

Online AncientU

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - GPSIIIA-2 - SLC-40 - May 2018
« Reply #61 on: 05/03/2016 07:34 PM »
So will USAF have to watch how SpaceX does the first GPS-III before they will award any other competitive launches?

That's not what I said btw. I said that they need more confidence before assigning something much more important to the LV. SpaceX will bid all competitive launches, what they will get though depends partly on this (especially since the contract details and the scoring procedure might change from one payload to the other).

I agree with you. USAF will not be able to wait until SpaceX launches USAF payloads, simply because of the timing of when the next 6-8 competitions will happen with respect to this first GPS-III launch.  They will have to judge the SpaceX bids on something else, like a string of commercial/CRS failures*, for example.  I wouldn't be surprised if they do limit the awards to payloads where they have room to lose or replace the payload, and manage competition/allocate the expensive, one-of-a-kind payloads to ULA. 

USAF watching commercial launches from a distance (not as intimately involved with SpaceX as ULA launches) is still better than nothing.

* or possibly successes...
« Last Edit: 05/03/2016 07:37 PM by AncientU »
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Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - GPSIIIA-2 - SLC-40 - May 2018
« Reply #62 on: 05/03/2016 07:39 PM »
I know it wasn't an NSS launch, but SpaceX has already successfully completed 1 launch for the USAF: DSCOVR.  This launch won't be their first date.
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online abaddon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - GPSIIIA-2 - SLC-40 - May 2018
« Reply #63 on: 05/03/2016 08:28 PM »
USAF watching commercial launches from a distance (not as intimately involved with SpaceX as ULA launches) is still better than nothing.
IIRC, SpaceX has said on several occasions that both the USAF and NASA get full and complete access to flight data.  Most notably during certification, and during the CRS-7 investigation.  "Not as intimately involved ... as ULA" is definitely correct, but "at a distance" is overstating things quite a bit.

Offline baldusi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - GPSIIIA-2 - SLC-40 - May 2018
« Reply #64 on: 05/04/2016 12:56 AM »
So why did not SpaceX bid $100 million?  It would have still won the contract...
For starters, the didn't knew (and I guess not even considered) that ULA would not bid. Second, making a very aggressive pricing on your competitor's only customer might be a death stroke. In fact, I guess they were worried about not opening themselves to a dumping lawsuit. But those are incremental launches that can be priced relatively low, and ULA really struggles if they can't launch 8 times per year. Since they have those huge fixed costs, stealing a couple of launches per year with the GPS bid might increase their prices as much as 30% and that will really put them in a very tight situation.

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS IIIA-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #65 on: 09/06/2017 03:50 AM »
Quote
Second Lockheed Martin GPS III Satellite Successfully Completes Test Simulating Strenuous Launch Environment
GPS III Space Vehicle 02 Completes Acoustic Testing

DENVER, Sept. 5, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Launch is the most strenuous part of a satellite's life. To survive the extreme sound wave pressure and pounding vibrations generated by more than 700,000 lbs. of thundering rocket thrust, spacecraft need a solid, reliable design if they hope to arrive operational on orbit.

On July 13, Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT)'s second, fully-assembled GPS III space vehicle (SV) completed a realistic simulation of its future launch experience and passed this critical acoustic environmental test with flying colors.

During acoustic testing, the GPS III SV02 satellite was continuously blasted with deafening sound reaching 140 decibels in a specialized test chamber equipped with high-powered horns. For comparison, that is about as loud as an aircraft carrier deck and human hearing starts to be damaged back at about 85 decibels. The test uses sound loud enough to literally shake loose anything not properly attached.

"With this launch-simulation test, we are talking about sophisticated, advanced satellite technology and electronics enduring tremendous forces and then working flawlessly afterward," said Mark Stewart, Lockheed Martin's vice president for Navigation Systems. "Passing this test with GPS III SV02 further validates the robustness of our GPS III design. We credit this success and risk-retirement to all the pathfinding work we accomplished early in the program."

The GPS III SV02 satellite is part of the U.S. Air Force's next generation of GPS satellites and will bring critical new capabilities to the warfighter. GPS III will have three times better accuracy and up to eight times improved anti-jamming capabilities. Spacecraft life will extend to 15 years, 25 percent longer than the newest GPS satellites on-orbit today. GPS III's new L1C civil signal also will make it the first GPS satellite to be interoperable with other international global navigation satellite systems.

GPS III SV02 is Lockheed Martin's second GPS III satellite to successfully complete acoustic testing. The company's first satellite, GPS III SV01 which is in storage awaiting its expected 2018 launch completed acoustic testing in 2015.

The GPS III SV02 satellite is now being prepared for Thermal Vacuum (TVAC) testing this fall, where it will be subjected to extreme cold and heat in zero atmosphere, simulating its on-orbit life. The satellite is expected to be delivered complete to the Air Force in early 2018.

GPS III SV02 is the second of 10 GPS III satellites Lockheed Martin is contracted for and is assembling in full production at the company's GPS III Processing Facility near Denver. The $128 million, state-of-the-art manufacturing factory includes a specialized cleanroom and testing chambers designed to streamline satellite production.

Lockheed Martin's unique GPS III satellite design includes a flexible, modular architecture that allows for the insertion of new technology as it becomes available in the future or if the Air Force's mission needs change. Satellites based off this design are already proven compatible with both the Air Force's next generation Operational Control System (OCX) and the existing GPS constellation.

The GPS III team is led by the Global Positioning Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Air Force Space Command's 2nd Space Operations Squadron (2SOPS), based at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, manages and operates the GPS constellation for both civil and military users.

For additional GPS III information, photos and video visit: www.lockheedmartin.com/gps.

About Lockheed Martin
Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

SOURCE Lockheed Martin

Offline Comga

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS IIIA-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #66 on: 09/06/2017 06:20 AM »
Quote
Second Lockheed Martin GPS III Satellite Successfully Completes Test Simulating Strenuous Launch Environment
GPS III Space Vehicle 02 Completes Acoustic Testing

DENVER, Sept. 5, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Launch is the most strenuous part of a satellite's life. To survive the extreme sound wave pressure and pounding vibrations generated by more than 700,000 lbs. of thundering rocket thrust, spacecraft need a solid, reliable design if they hope to arrive operational on orbit.

(snip)

SOURCE Lockheed Martin

Isn't 700,000 lbs a relatively small value?
A current F9 is well over 1e6 kbf.
Why would LM do that?
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS IIIA-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #67 on: 09/06/2017 07:41 AM »
Isn't 700,000 lbs a relatively small value?
A current F9 is well over 1e6 kbf.
Why would LM do that?

I think its just a typo. They meant to write 1,700,000 lbf.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline beidou

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS IIIA-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #68 on: 11/17/2017 09:11 PM »
Do we have an approximate launch date for this mission?

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS IIIA-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #69 on: 11/17/2017 09:44 PM »
Do we have an approximate launch date for this mission?

I haven't seen one.  If it's still launching second then it may be a while.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #70 on: 11/17/2017 11:04 PM »
An image was posted in the ULA GPS III-1 thread that showed how integration of GPS would be performed at SpaceX. Attached is a cropped and enlarged section of that image.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30912.msg1751112#msg1751112
« Last Edit: 11/17/2017 11:05 PM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #71 on: 11/18/2017 01:46 AM »
An image was posted in the ULA GPS III-1 thread that showed how integration of GPS would be performed at SpaceX. Attached is a cropped and enlarged section of that image.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30912.msg1751112#msg1751112

That is the standard for all Spacex launches

Online Brovane

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #72 on: 11/18/2017 05:30 AM »
An image was posted in the ULA GPS III-1 thread that showed how integration of GPS would be performed at SpaceX. Attached is a cropped and enlarged section of that image.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30912.msg1751112#msg1751112

Doesn't this animation imply that the payload will be horizontally integrated? 
"Look at that! If anybody ever said, "you'll be sitting in a spacecraft naked with a 134-pound backpack on your knees charging it", I'd have said "Aw, get serious". - John Young - Apollo-16

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : GPS III-2 : SLC-40 : NET May 2018
« Reply #73 on: 11/18/2017 05:39 AM »
Doesn't this animation imply that the payload will be horizontally integrated? 

Yes and no. GPS is vertically integrated onto the PAF (Payload Attach Fitting) with the fairings vertically encapsulated. The whole thing is then rotated and horizontally integrated with the second stage. As Jim said, this is the way SpaceX integrates all their payloads.
« Last Edit: 11/18/2017 05:39 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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