Author Topic: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV Mk II, 2021  (Read 17552 times)

Offline Ohsin

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Re: ISRO-NASA Joint Satellite Project
« Reply #20 on: 11/20/2015 05:12 AM »
"Well, three cheers to Sharma, but our real baby is INSAT."

Offline Ohsin

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Re: ISRO-NASA Joint Satellite Project
« Reply #21 on: 04/13/2016 02:17 AM »
Quote
Airbus Defence and Space will supply their latest generation Solid State Recorder for the NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) mission, slated for launch in 2020.
<snip>
Jean-Pierre Domenget, who heads up the company's Space Equipment division, reported that the Solid State Recorders will offer 10 Tbit and more as far as capacity is concerned, all in a unit that has a total mass of less than 25 kg.

http://www.satnews.com/story.php?number=82202807
"Well, three cheers to Sharma, but our real baby is INSAT."

Offline input~2

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Offline vyoma

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #23 on: 08/13/2016 11:05 PM »

Offline vyoma

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #24 on: 08/16/2016 07:00 PM »
https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2016/08/16/864626/10164579/en/Northrop-Grumman-s-Astro-Aerospace-Completes-NISAR-Reflector-Preliminary-Design-Review.html

Quote
Astro Aerospace, a Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) company, has completed the preliminary design review (PDR) of the AstroMesh® radar antenna reflector for the NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) satellite. The antenna reflector, furnished by Astro Aerospace, is part of the NISAR L-band synthetic aperture radar managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Offline Shams

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #25 on: 08/17/2016 10:59 AM »
Can anybody tell about the total mass of this satellite?

Offline vineethgk

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #26 on: 08/17/2016 01:55 PM »
Can anybody tell about the total mass of this satellite?
As per previous reports, it was something in the range of 3 tonnes I believe.
« Last Edit: 08/17/2016 02:01 PM by vineethgk »

Offline vyoma

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #27 on: 08/17/2016 05:41 PM »
ISRO and NASA-JPL are developing "L & S Band Airborne SAR" as a precursor to satellite payloads.
« Last Edit: 10/12/2016 06:40 PM by vyoma »

Offline vyoma

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #28 on: 08/17/2016 05:48 PM »
"L & S Band Airborne SAR" application research announcement.

Offline vyoma

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #29 on: 08/17/2016 06:20 PM »

Offline tehwkd

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Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #31 on: 08/22/2016 06:23 AM »
GSLV Mk II not GSLV

Umm, it says GSLV Mark II!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline tehwkd

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Re: NISAR, NASA-ISRO SAR Joint Satellite Project, GSLV, 2021
« Reply #32 on: 08/22/2016 06:54 AM »
GSLV Mk II not GSLV

Umm, it says GSLV Mark II!

And the title of this topic says GSLV. Which is why I said "GSLV Mk II not GSLV".

I did not say "GLSV Mk II not, GSLV". :)
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Offline input~2

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Title corrected, thanks!

Offline Shams

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GSLV mk2 payload capacity max 2.5 ton. I think  satellite capacity max 3.0 ton. How it is possible? Will ISRO increase the pay load capacity upto 3.00 ton

Offline vineethgk

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GSLV mk2 payload capacity max 2.5 ton. I think  satellite capacity max 3.0 ton. How it is possible? Will ISRO increase the pay load capacity upto 3.00 ton
GSLV's payload capability to SSO is in the range of 3.1 tonnes as per an older ISRO presentation posted in this thread (link). 2.5T is its GTO capability.
« Last Edit: 08/22/2016 12:07 PM by vineethgk »

Offline vineethgk

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ISRO to conduct tests for NISAR in Ahmedabad city sky
Quote
The flight test for the biggest collaboration project between ISRO and NASA — NISAR (NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar) will be held over the city sky. The project involves building a 2,600 kg satellite to understand changes in the earth’s surface, icesheet collapses and natural calamities. Space Application Centre of ISRO has planned the flight testing late in March or early April to give scientists direction for the NISAR program that is scheduled to be launched in 2020.

The satellite is designed to observe and take measurements of some of the planet's most complex processes, including ecosystem disturbances, ice-sheet collapse, and natural hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes and landslides. Regarding the testing that is being planned in a couple of weeks, SAC Director Tapan Misra said, “The flight testing will happen right above aapnu Amdavad. It will be at an altitude of 8 to 10 km above Ahmedabad till final planning of the NISAR program. We will read data from airborne station first which will help scientists prepare for the program.

The frequency and solutions will be same as real project but coverage area will be limited.” A 5 km radius of Ahmedabad city will be taken into account by the station for testing purpose. NISAR will reveal information about the evolution and state of the earth’s crust. The data will help scientists better understand our planet’s processes and changing climate. This will also help in hazard management. About their partnership with NASA, Misra said, “After we launched RISAT in April 2012, NASA evinced in-terest in developing a satellite jointly that can help observing earth in better way with new technology and that is when the journey started.”

RISAT facilitates cloud penetration and imaging even without sunlight. For the airborne test model, both L and S bands have been developed by ISRO. For the final mission, ISRO will design and develop the S-band SAR, Spacecraft Bus, data transmission system, spacecraft integration and testing, launch using heavy rocket geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle (GSLV) and on-orbit operations, while NASA will be responsible for design and development of L-band SAR, 12m unfurlable antenna and its deployment elements, global positioning system (GPS) and data recorder. The satellite will be able to measure earth crust movement minutely, up to millimetres.
« Last Edit: 03/09/2017 05:49 AM by vineethgk »

Offline Danderman

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This should be an interesting object for amateur satellite observers, depending on its position relative to the terminator.

Which raises the issue of why a radar satellite would go into a sun-synch orbit.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Which raises the issue of why a radar satellite would go into a sun-synch orbit.

That's a good question. Its obviously not about having the same sun angle every day, since the illumination source is the satellite itself. If the crossing is at dawn and dusk, that would mean the satellite is in constant solar illumination and so would require smaller smaller solar arrays and batteries. SSO also means the revisit time is in multiple of days, instead of some odd time interval.
« Last Edit: 03/09/2017 09:04 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline baldusi

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This should be an interesting object for amateur satellite observers, depending on its position relative to the terminator.

Which raises the issue of why a radar satellite would go into a sun-synch orbit.
SAR usually go to SSO. Illumination is constant and thus you can get away with fixed solar panels, and thermal management is greatly simplified by having a hot side and a cold side.
Please remember that these satellites also have huge antennas that have to stay pointed to Earth.

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