Author Topic: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)  (Read 321733 times)

Offline newpylong

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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #41 on: 05/23/2013 05:53 AM »
Thanks for that newpylong. I presume the MSFC Dynamic Test Stand that was used for Saturn V and Space Shuttle is now too old to be used.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline renclod

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #42 on: 05/23/2013 09:00 AM »
Thanks @ATK !


Offline renclod

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #43 on: 05/23/2013 09:40 AM »
... I presume the MSFC Dynamic Test Stand that was used for Saturn V and Space Shuttle is now too old to be used.

" The historical Saturn V Dynamic Test Stand at Marshall was renovated to perform the IVGVT [integrated vehicle ground vibration testing] on the Ares I rocket and the Orion crew capsule.

The Test Stand 4550, with the fully renovated and certified 200-ton derrick crane, can be used to support any other future launch vehicle or major system dynamics testing continuing the legacy of testing which includes the Saturn V launch vehicle, the Apollo spacecraft, and the space shuttle.

... task for close-out of the door and roof ... was completed in early June 2011... completed all tasks for raising the door and reinstalling the three roof panels on TS 4550..."


Offline OV135

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #44 on: 05/23/2013 01:49 PM »
I like this photo. Is there any close up of just the diagram of the SLS in the VAB cutaway? http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=31740.0;attach=519722;image

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #45 on: 05/23/2013 02:04 PM »
I like this photo. Is there any close up of just the diagram of the SLS in the VAB cutaway? http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=31740.0;attach=519722;image

Here you go:

Online edkyle99

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #46 on: 05/23/2013 07:47 PM »
... I presume the MSFC Dynamic Test Stand that was used for Saturn V and Space Shuttle is now too old to be used.

" The historical Saturn V Dynamic Test Stand at Marshall was renovated to perform the IVGVT [integrated vehicle ground vibration testing] on the Ares I rocket and the Orion crew capsule.
It was renovated, but of course not fully outfitted for testing.  As I understand things it will not be used for SLS dynamic testing - because there won't be any full-scale SLS dynamic testing of that type.  All previous U.S. manned launch vehicles have undergone such full-scale dynamic testing, so I wonder how such a choice can be defended. 

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 05/23/2013 08:53 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline renclod

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #47 on: 05/23/2013 09:48 PM »

... so I wonder how such a choice can be defended. 


Easy, IMO : No money. Trust your computer models and hope for validation with hard data from the first test flight.

IVGVT is an extravagance in this new world of space flight ...

« Last Edit: 05/23/2013 09:52 PM by renclod »

Offline newpylong

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #48 on: 05/29/2013 04:46 PM »
Not much new here, but anyone interested in SLS may enjoy this Vodcast with Todd May on SLS development:

http://www.nasa.gov/mp4/749781main_NE00051713_100_SLS.mp4

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #49 on: 05/31/2013 12:36 PM »
Going to clear a few hours out today and write up a meaty SLS article.

Online RotoSequence

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #50 on: 05/31/2013 01:14 PM »
Going to clear a few hours out today and write up a meaty SLS article.

Amidst all the general negativity going around about the program, I'm looking forward to seeing some substantial (and substantiated) material. :)

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #51 on: 05/31/2013 06:34 PM »
Flipping Adapters for Space Launch System

Published on May 31, 2013
The structural test article adapter is flipped at Marshall testing facility Building 4705. The turnover is an important step in finishing the machining work on the adapter, which will undergo tests to certify subsequent flight units used to attach the Orion spacecraft to a Delta IV rocket for its 2014 Exploration Flight Test-1. (NASA/MSFC)

Tony De La Rosa


Offline AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #53 on: 06/03/2013 10:51 PM »
SLS Boosters Centered on Qualification Test

The center aft segment for qualification motor-1 (QM-1), a full-scale version of a solid rocket motor for the Space Launch System (SLS), was transported May 29 to its test area at ATK's facility in Promontory, Utah. SLS is an advanced heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new national capability for human exploration beyond Earth's orbit.

The center aft piece will be integrated with the other segments in preparation for a test firing of QM-1, scheduled for late 2013. The five-segment booster is the largest, most powerful solid rocket booster ever built for flight.

The SLS Program is managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. ATK is the prime contractor for the boosters. The booster development is on track to support SLS's first flight in 2017.

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/gallery/sls_booster_test.html

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #54 on: 06/06/2013 04:00 PM »
Production of Key Equipment Paves Way for NASA SLS RS-25 Testing
May 6, 2013

NASA plans to begin testing RS-25 engines for its new Space Launch System (SLS) in the fall of 2014, and the agency's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi has a very big -- literally -- item to complete on the preparation checklist.

Fabrication recently began at Stennis on a new 7,755-pound thrust frame adapter for the A-1 Test Stand to enable testing of the engines that will provide core-stage power for NASA's SLS. The stand component is scheduled to be completed and installed by November 2013.

"We initially thought we would have to go offsite to have the equipment built," said Gary Benton, RS-25 test project manager at Stennis. "However, the Stennis design team figured out a way to build it here with resulting cost and schedule savings. Itís a big project and a critical one to ensure we obtain accurate data during engine testing."

Each rocket engine type requires a thrust frame adapter unique to its specifications. On the test stand, the adapter is attached to the thrust measurement system. A rocket engine then is attached to the adapter, which must hold the engine in place and absorb the thrust produced during a test, while allowing accurate measurement of the engine performance.

The J-2X equipment installed on the A-1 Test Stand now cannot be used to test RS-25 engines since it does not match the engine specifications and thrust requirements. For instance, the J-2X engine is capable of producing 294,000 pounds of thrust. The RS-25 engine will produce approximately 530,000 pounds of thrust.

NASA and the Lockheed Martin Test Operations Contract Group team worked together in designing the new adapter to make sure such requirements were met. They also communicated closely with the Jacobs Technology welding and machine shop teams to make sure what was being designed actually could be built.

The design had to account for a number of considerations, such as specific stresses on the equipment as an engine is fired and then gimbaled (rotated) during a test; what type and strength of bolts are needed to fully secure the equipment; and what materials can be used to build the adapter.

"This is a very specific process," Benton said. "It is critical that thrust data not be skewed or compromised during a test, so the adapter has to be precisely designed and constructed."

The fabrication process itself involves handling and shaping large segments of certain material, which required welders to receive specialized training. In addition, shop personnel had to create a welding procedure for dealing with the chosen construction material. For instance, the area of material being welded must maintain a heat of 300 degrees in order to ensure welds bond properly. That procedure and other specifications are being incorporated into Stennis standards.

"It's a challenging project," said Kent Morris, RS-25 project manager for Jacobs Technology. "It's similar to the J-2X adapter project, but larger. It will take considerable man hours to perform the welding and machining needed on the material. The material used for the engine mounting block alone is 32 inches in diameter and 20 inches thick."

Physically, the adapter is the largest facility item on the preparation checklist for RS-25 testing, but it is far from the only one, Benton said. Additional modifications will be made to the test stand configuration and equipment once J-2X gimbal testing is complete this summer.

Once testing begins, engineers and test team personnel at Stennis will draw on a wealth of engine testing experience. The RS-25 engines, previously known as the space shuttle main engines were tested at Stennis for more than three decades.

The SLS Program is managed at NASAís Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. For information about NASA's SLS Program, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/sls/

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/fabrication.html

Image Captions

Concept, Thrust Frame Adapter for SLS
This design image shows a RS-25 rocket engine installed on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center. A line indicates the grey, cross-like thrust frame adapter, which is being fabricated for the stand. The adapter is attached to the thrust measurement system on the stand, and the RS-25 engine is attached to the adapter. The adapter holds the engine in place and absorbs the thrust produced during a test, while allowing accurate measurement of the engine performance.
Image credit: NASA/SSC

Fabrication of Thrust Frame Adapter for SLS
Fabrication is under way on a 7,755-pound thrust frame adapter to be installed on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. The new adapter is needed to enable testing of RS-25 rocket engines (former space shuttle main engines), which will be used to provide core-stage power for NASA's new Space Launch System. NASA has worked with contractor teams at Stennis to design and fabricate the adapter, which is scheduled to be completed and installed on the test stand by November 2013. The SLS Program is managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
Image credit: NASA/SSC

Offline Mark S

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #55 on: 06/06/2013 05:10 PM »
Now that's a big hunk of "certain material".  ;D

Are they going to be testing the engines on a different test stand than the one(s) they used for the past 30 years of SSME testing?  If so, why? If not, why do they need a new adapter?

Offline newpylong

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #56 on: 06/06/2013 05:58 PM »
As far as I know the SSMEs were last tested almost 10 years ago there, and the equipment has since been removed to test J-2X when Constellation began. I would think the new adapter would also need to support higher thrust than the SSME as they are rumored to be up-rated for SLS.

Offline ChileVerde

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #57 on: 06/06/2013 06:22 PM »
As far as I know the SSMEs were last tested almost 10 years ago there, and the equipment has since been removed to test J-2X when Constellation began. I would think the new adapter would also need to support higher thrust than the SSME as they are rumored to be up-rated for SLS.

I would encourage Our Gracious Host (that would be Chris) to do an article on the RS-25s. 

It seems that the existing RS-25Ds will be operated in a significantly different regime than they were on STS because, among other things, they need to keep acceleration at a level that won't produce too high pressures at the pump inlets. And RS-25E, which will need to be available post-2025 (EM-5 and after) is still somewhat undefined, but indications are that it won't be just a minor modification of the D version. Lotsa development and testing to come.
"I canít tell you which asteroid, but there will be one in 2025," Bolden asserted.

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #58 on: 06/06/2013 07:14 PM »
As far as I know the SSMEs were last tested almost 10 years ago there [...]

Minor nit-pick: the last test firing of an SSME on Stennis Test Stand A2 was on July 29, 2009 (with a duration of 520 seconds).  So just less than four years ago.  ;)

Offline renclod

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #59 on: 06/06/2013 07:19 PM »

Are they going to be testing the engines on a different test stand than the one(s) they used for the past 30 years of SSME testing? ... If not, why do they need a new adapter?


Because it was used for so long...

Back in 2010 the test stand (A-1) was upgraded. Even the thrust take-out structure and the thrust measurement system were replaced.

There are photos at ntrs.
 
« Last Edit: 06/06/2013 07:23 PM by renclod »

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