Author Topic: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?  (Read 77602 times)

Offline Alpha_Centauri

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 499
  • England
  • Liked: 141
  • Likes Given: 103
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #20 on: 10/01/2012 12:51 PM »
Well Ares established a trend for naming based on the ultimate destination.

So how about "Utopia"?

Offline Lobo

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6574
  • Spokane, WA
  • Liked: 472
  • Likes Given: 280
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #21 on: 10/01/2012 04:16 PM »
Lobo, NASA didn't call VSE 'Constellation' Program or the Ares until 2 years after it was announced.

Fair point.  CaLV and CLV weren't named Ares 1 and V right away, but I think they had names by the time they were as far along in development as SLS is, weren't they?   And we pretty much knew they wouldn't be known as CaLV, CLV, LSAM, and CEV  forever.  Those were fairly obviously placeholder titles.  Weren't there inklings that NASA would give them names prior to the official annuncement?  Are there those same inklings floating around NSF now?  I haven't heard anything.  You think there'd be some scuttlebutt about it by now.  We are two years after NAA2010, where SLS was announced, afterall.

I'd like to see it get a name, I just get the impression that SLS is and will be the name. 

Myself, if it -does- get a name, I like "Nova" or "Hercules".
Nova has old NASA heritage for a larger-than-Saturn class rocket, which is what SLS is mandated to evolve in to (even though it might never actually do that). 
It's simple, and has heritage.
Hercules is a good name for a simple heavy lifter, like a C-130.  And conjures images of it being large and pwoerful, which it will be.  It's common enough that the public will recognize it.

"Uranus" obviously has it's sound-similarity issues, and Neptune just sort of conjures up images of water (even among the general public.  Anyone who recognizes the name will think water).  Not quite the association you are looking for in a space rocket.  Seems like a good name for a class of submarine or something.

Jupiter works fine, but probably won't be picked for reasons discussed previously.  Mercury, Venus, MArs, and Pluto just don't conjure up imagines of a big, powerful, heavy lifter.  So if not Jupiter, probably better to abandon the Roman/Planet motif.   There are better names to choose from.

Offline clongton

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10206
  • Connecticut
    • Direct Launcher
  • Liked: 1853
  • Likes Given: 580
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #22 on: 10/01/2012 04:53 PM »
Jupiter :)
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline spectre9

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2403
  • Australia
  • Liked: 35
  • Likes Given: 66
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #23 on: 10/01/2012 05:28 PM »
Delta V?  :D

Online M_Puckett

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 468
  • Liked: 82
  • Likes Given: 57
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #24 on: 10/01/2012 05:45 PM »
'Pancetta', 'Collops', 'Trotter', 'Gammon'.. so many great names to choose from.


 ::)  ::)

Trotter?  How about Strider?

Offline MP99

Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #25 on: 10/01/2012 07:10 PM »
'Prometheus' is reserved for the first NEP/NTP spacecraft, IMHO at least.

Or the first torchship.

cheers, Martin

Offline FinalFrontier

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3785
  • Space Watcher
  • Liked: 232
  • Likes Given: 111
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #26 on: 10/01/2012 07:12 PM »
Name it D.C. Pork since that's what it is.

Jupiter :)

If it had liquid or 4 segment boosters...... ::)
« Last Edit: 10/01/2012 07:14 PM by FinalFrontier »
3-30-2017: The start of a great future
"Live Long and Prosper"

Offline A_M_Swallow

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8009
  • South coast of England
  • Liked: 236
  • Likes Given: 86
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #27 on: 10/01/2012 08:31 PM »
If Norse gods can be used try 'Odin'. 

Odin ruled Asgard and was a traveller.  That sounds appropriate for the biggest LV in the world.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odin
« Last Edit: 10/01/2012 08:31 PM by A_M_Swallow »

Offline hkultala

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 490
  • Liked: 107
  • Likes Given: 27
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #28 on: 10/02/2012 05:35 AM »
If Norse gods can be used try 'Odin'. 

Odin ruled Asgard and was a traveller.  That sounds appropriate for the biggest LV in the world.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odin

But will SLS become the worlds biggest LV?

It will propably be the biggest operational LV(but not biggest ever built) for couple of years, but china's Long March 9 might then be both earlier and bigger than SLS block II, becoming the biggest ever-built.


Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10447
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 2191
  • Likes Given: 298
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #29 on: 10/02/2012 07:28 AM »
I like Jupiter. It conveys the spirit and awesomeness of the Saturn launch vehicles.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Lobo

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6574
  • Spokane, WA
  • Liked: 472
  • Likes Given: 280
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #30 on: 10/02/2012 05:02 PM »
If Norse gods can be used try 'Odin'. 

Odin ruled Asgard and was a traveller.  That sounds appropriate for the biggest LV in the world.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odin

But will SLS become the worlds biggest LV?

It will propably be the biggest operational LV(but not biggest ever built) for couple of years, but china's Long March 9 might then be both earlier and bigger than SLS block II, becoming the biggest ever-built.


Block 1 will be by far the largest and most powerful LV in the world in 2017, but certainly not the biggest every built.  The Long March 5, which can only put a max of 25mt to LEO isn’t due to launch until 2014.  So they’d need to move things along pretty fast to get the Long March 9 just a few years after SLS Block 1.

Down the road a ways, yea, Long March 9, if every built and flow, could be larger than Block 1 or Block 1B. Not sure if it would be larger than Block 2 though, if Block 2 is ever built. 

Offline clongton

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10206
  • Connecticut
    • Direct Launcher
  • Liked: 1853
  • Likes Given: 580
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #31 on: 10/02/2012 11:20 PM »
I like Jupiter. It conveys the spirit and awesomeness of the Saturn launch vehicles.

2 thumbs up
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline RanulfC

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4411
  • Heus tu Omnis! Vigilate Hoc!
  • Liked: 760
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #32 on: 10/03/2012 01:36 PM »
I like Jupiter. It conveys the spirit and awesomeness of the Saturn launch vehicles.

2 thumbs up
I like Jupiter also, though I'd have to mention we already DID the Jupiter:
Jupiter-C
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jupiter-C

Jupiter MRBM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PGM-19_Jupiter

and of course the Jupiter-2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_in_Space

Other than that I love the idea :)

Randy
From The Amazing Catstronaut on the Black Arrow LV:
British physics, old chap. It's undignified to belch flames and effluvia all over the pad, what. A true gentlemen's orbital conveyance lifts itself into the air unostentatiously, with the minimum of spectacle and a modicum of grace. Not like our American cousins' launch vehicles, eh?

Offline Pastor Bill

  • Member
  • Posts: 19
  • Central MA
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #33 on: 10/03/2012 01:49 PM »
How about the Kayleigh... after my daughter  :)

Offline luksol

  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #34 on: 10/03/2012 01:55 PM »
As it will launch Orion, how about Poseidon, supposed father of Orion from greek mythology?

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30364
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 8669
  • Likes Given: 283
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #35 on: 10/03/2012 02:17 PM »
As it will launch Orion, how about Poseidon, supposed father of Orion from greek mythology?

Already been used

Offline aquanaut99

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1040
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #36 on: 10/03/2012 02:34 PM »

Block 1 will be by far the largest and most powerful LV in the world in 2017, but certainly not the biggest every built.  The Long March 5, which can only put a max of 25mt to LEO isn’t due to launch until 2014.  So they’d need to move things along pretty fast to get the Long March 9 just a few years after SLS Block 1.

Down the road a ways, yea, Long March 9, if every built and flow, could be larger than Block 1 or Block 1B. Not sure if it would be larger than Block 2 though, if Block 2 is ever built. 


AIUI, the Long March 9 is supposed to be able to launch 130 mT into LEO, same as the SLS Block II. Of course, both are only paper rockets right now. In fact, the LM-9 is even more of a paper rocket than SLS Block II (which at least builds up on SLS block I) because it would require an entirely new 9m core as well as new engines that haven't even been designed yet...

As for the name: I would propose we keep calling it SLS until the beast actually flies, then quietly rename it "Ares". By that time, any association with CxP will be forgotten (both the public and politicians have a short attention span).
« Last Edit: 10/03/2012 02:37 PM by aquanaut99 »

Offline luksol

  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Will 'SLS' ever be known by a different name?
« Reply #37 on: 10/03/2012 02:37 PM »
As it will launch Orion, how about Poseidon, supposed father of Orion from greek mythology?

Already been used

Military missile? Does this disqualify this name? I don't know much about NASA naming policy, maybe someone could explain it?
If not Poseidon, then maybe Neptune? Roman equivalent to greek Poseidon and somehow in line with previous names like Jupiter and Saturn.

Offline Joel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 532
  • Madison, WI
  • Liked: 42
  • Likes Given: 41

Offline Zed_Noir

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2081
  • Canada
  • Liked: 253
  • Likes Given: 378

Tags: