Author Topic: ESA - Euclid updates  (Read 7610 times)

Offline bolun

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ESA - Euclid updates
« on: 06/20/2012 02:23 PM »
Euclid, Mapping the geometry of the dark Universe

Mission Summary

- Theme: How did the Universe originate and what is it made of?
 
- Primary Goal: To understand the nature of dark energy and dark matter by accurate measurement of the accelerated expansion of the Universe through different independent methods.
 
- Targets: Galaxies and clusters of galaxies out to z~2, in a wide extragalactic survey covering 15 000 deg², plus a deep survey covering an area of 40 deg²
 
- Wavelength: Visible and near-infrared

- Telescope: 1.2 m Korsch

- Orbit: Second Sun-Earth Lagrange point, L2

- Lifetime: 6 years

- Type: M-class mission

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=102

-------

ESA´s M-class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates (NSF Thread)

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=19694.0

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #1 on: 06/20/2012 02:26 PM »
Dark Universe mission blueprint complete

20 Jun 2012

ESA's Euclid mission to explore the hidden side of the Universe - dark energy and dark matter - reached an important milestone today that will move the mission to the next level of development.

Selected in October 2011 alongside Solar Orbiter as one of the first two medium-class missions of the Cosmic Vision 2015-25 plan, Euclid received final approval from ESA's Science Programme Committee to move into the full construction phase, leading to its launch in 2020.

The committee also formalised an agreement between ESA and funding agencies in a number of its Member States to develop Euclid's two scientific instruments, a visible-wavelength camera and a near-infrared camera/spectrometer, and the large distributed processing system needed to analyse the data they produce.

Finally, the committee agreed on a Memorandum of Understanding between ESA and NASA that will see the US space agency help to provide infrared detectors.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50471

and

http://www.bis.gov.uk/ukspaceagency/news-and-events/2012/Jun/dark-universe-mission-blueprint-complete
« Last Edit: 06/20/2012 02:37 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #2 on: 06/20/2012 02:58 PM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18503703

Quote
The cost to Esa of building, launching and operating Euclid is expected to be just over 600m euros (£480m; $760m). Member states will provide Euclid's visible wavelength camera and a near-infrared camera/spectrometer, taking the likely cost of the whole endeavour beyond 800m euros.

The US has been offered, and will accept, a junior role in the mission valued at around 5%. The American space agency (Nasa) will pay for this by picking up the tab for the infrared detectors needed on Euclid. A memorandum of understanding to this effect will be signed between the agencies in due course.

"We have negotiated a detailed text with Nasa, which both parties consider final, and it is ready for signature," said Dr Fabio Favata, Esa's head of science planning.

"It will mean a small, commensurate number of US scientists will be welcomed into the Euclid Consortium," he told BBC News.

The consortium is the team that will have access to Euclid's data.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2012 07:05 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #3 on: 06/20/2012 07:08 PM »
http://www.spacenews.com/civil/120620-esa-approval-euclid.html

Quote
The scientific push on Euclid’s behalf was so great that ESA agreed to accept the mission even though its cost to ESA — 606 million euros ($788 million) in 2012 economic conditions — is far higher than the nominal budget of 475 million euros that ESA had set for so-called Medium-class science missions.

Just as much of a concern when the SPC adopted Euclid in October was whether key ESA member states, notably France, Britain and Italy, would be able to commit to providing the observing instruments and the various ground centers that Euclid will need. ESA has estimated that the instruments to be provided by national European agencies and laboratories are valued at around 150 million euros. A similar amount will be needed for Euclid’s elaborate ground network, including eight data centers distributed around Europe.

Given these uncertainties — and to leave time to assure that Euclid’s design could be accommodated by a Soyuz rocket — the SPC gave itself until June to verify the mission. That waiting period pushed the scheduled launch from 2019 to 2020 but otherwise the project’s estimated cost has not changed in the past year, Rene Laureijs, ESA’s Euclid project scientist, said in a June 20 interview.

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #4 on: 06/22/2012 09:03 PM »
Illuminating the dark: Ahead with the Euclid mission

22 Jun 2012

UK teams working on the mission to study the “dark Universe” are being granted a planned £8.5M by the UK Space Agency to develop scientific instruments. This is following the formal adoption of the largest collaboration of astronomers in the world by the European Space Agency (ESA) to help build the Euclid satellite.

http://www.bis.gov.uk/ukspaceagency/news-and-events/2012/Jun/illuminating-the-dark-ahead-with-the-euclid-mission


Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #5 on: 06/22/2012 09:10 PM »
http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10080/150_read-3987/

Quote
The overall optical design for the near-infrared spectrometer and photometer (NISP) and the lenses of the instrument will be developed and provided by the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, near Munich. Shown here is an optical lens holder during the first test.

Online jacqmans

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #6 on: 01/24/2013 02:57 PM »
NASA joins ESA’s ‘dark Universe’ mission
 
24 January 2013

 NASA has officially joined ESA’s Euclid mission, a space telescope designed to investigate the mysterious natures of dark matter and dark energy.
 
To be launched in 2020, Euclid’s 1.2 m-diameter telescope and two scientific instruments will map the shape, brightness and 3D distribution of two billion galaxies covering more than a third of the whole sky and looking back over three-quarters of the history of the Universe.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/NASA_joins_ESA_s_dark_Universe_mission
 
« Last Edit: 01/24/2013 02:57 PM by jacqmans »

Online jacqmans

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #7 on: 01/24/2013 04:04 PM »
RELEASE: 13-029

NASA JOINS ESA'S 'DARK UNIVERSE' MISSION

WASHINGTON -- NASA has joined the European Space Agency's (ESA's)
Euclid mission, a space telescope designed to investigate the
cosmological mysteries of dark matter and dark energy.

Euclid will launch in 2020 and spend six years mapping the locations
and measuring the shapes of as many as 2 billion galaxies spread over
more than one-third of the sky. It will study the evolution of our
universe, and the dark matter and dark energy that influence its
evolution in ways that still are poorly understood.

The telescope will launch to an orbit around the sun-Earth Lagrange
point L2. The Lagrange point is a location where the gravitational
pull of two large masses, the sun and Earth in this case, precisely
equals the force required for a small object, such as the Euclid
spacecraft, to maintain a relatively stationary position behind Earth
as seen from the sun.

"NASA is very proud to contribute to ESA's mission to understand one
of the greatest science mysteries of our time," said John Grunsfeld,
associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate at the
agency's Headquarters in Washington.

NASA and ESA recently signed an agreement outlining NASA's role in the
project. NASA will contribute 16 state-of-the-art infrared detectors
and four spare detectors for one of two science instruments planned
for Euclid.

"ESA's Euclid mission is designed to probe one of the most fundamental
questions in modern cosmology, and we welcome NASA's contribution to
this important endeavor, the most recent in a long history of
cooperation in space science between our two agencies," said Alvaro
Giménez, ESA's Director of Science and Robotic Exploration.

In addition, NASA has nominated three U.S. science teams totaling 40
new members for the Euclid Consortium. This is in addition to 14 U.S.
scientists already supporting the mission. The Euclid Consortium is
an international body of 1,000 members who will oversee development
of the instruments, manage science operations, and analyze data.

Euclid will map the dark matter in the universe. Matter as we know it
-- the atoms that make up the human body, for example -- is a
fraction of the total matter in the universe. The rest, about 85
percent, is dark matter consisting of particles of an unknown type.
Dark matter first was postulated in 1932, but still has not been
detected directly. It is called dark matter because it does not
interact with light. Dark matter interacts with ordinary matter
through gravity and binds galaxies together like an invisible glue.

While dark matter pulls matter together, dark energy pushes the
universe apart at ever-increasing speeds. In terms of the total
mass-energy content of the universe, dark energy dominates. Even less
is known about dark energy than dark matter.

Euclid will use two techniques to study the dark universe, both
involving precise measurements of galaxies billions of light-years
away. The observations will yield the best measurements yet of how
the acceleration of the universe has changed over time, providing new
clues about the evolution and fate of the cosmos.

Euclid is an ESA mission with science instruments provided by a
consortia of European institutes and with important participation
from NASA. NASA's Euclid Project Office is based at NASA's Jet
Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. JPL will contribute
the infrared flight detectors for the Euclid science instrument.
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., will test the
infrared flight detectors prior to delivery. Three U.S. science teams
will contribute to science planning and data analysis.

For more information about NASA, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov

Offline catdlr

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #8 on: 02/12/2013 07:33 PM »
News release: 2013-055                                                             Feb. 12, 2013

JPL to Lead U.S. Science Team for Dark Energy Mission

 

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-055&cid=release_2013-055

PASADENA, Calif. -- The European Space Agency (ESA) has selected three NASA-nominated science teams to participate in their planned Euclid mission, including one team led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

NASA is a partner in the Euclid mission, a space telescope designed to probe the mysteries of dark energy and dark matter. Euclid is currently scheduled to launch in 2020.

JPL will provide 16 advanced infrared detectors and four spare detectors for one of two instruments planned for the mission. In addition, JPL will contribute to science planning and data analysis with the help of its 43-member science team, the largest of the three U.S. teams. This team, led by JPL scientist Jason Rhodes, is composed of 29 scientists recently nominated by NASA, and 14 U.S. scientists who are already part of Euclid.

The other two U.S. science teams are led by Ranga-Ram Chary of the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; and Alexander Kashlinsky of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; with three and seven members, respectively.

Rhodes also was appointed by NASA to be a member of ESA's principal 12-member Euclid Science Team and the U.S. representative for the Euclid Consortium's governing body. The Euclid Consortium is an international body of 1,000 members, including the U.S. science team members, and will build the instruments and analyze the science data jointly.

"Understanding the hidden contents of the universe and the nature of the dark energy will require the collaboration of astronomers and engineers around the world," said Rhodes.

Euclid will observe up to two billion galaxies occupying more than one-third of the sky with the goal of better understanding the contents of our universe. Everyday matter that we see around us, for example in tables and chairs, people and even stars, makes up only a few percent of everything in our cosmos. If you could fill a bucket with the mass and energy contents of our universe, this everyday matter would fill only a small fraction. A larger amount, about 24 percent, would consist of dark matter, an invisible substance that does not reflect or emit any light, but exerts a gravitational tug on other matter.

The majority of our universal bucket, about 73 percent, is thought to be filled with dark energy, something even more mysterious than dark matter. Whereas dark matter pulls through its gravity, dark energy is thought to be a repulsive force pushing matter apart. Scientists think dark energy may be responsible for stretching our universe apart at ever-increasing speeds, an observation that earned the Nobel Prize in 2011.

Euclid scientists will use two methods to make the most precise measurements yet of our "dark" universe. The first method, called weak lensing, involves analyzing the shapes of billions of galaxies across more than half the age of the universe. When dark matter lies in front of galaxies, it can't be seen, but its gravity distorts the light from the galaxies behind it. More dark matter will lead to slightly larger distortions. By measuring these minute distortions, scientists can understand the amount and distribution of the dark matter between these galaxies and us.

Changes in these dark matter structures over time are governed by interplay between the attractive force of gravity and the repulsive dark energy. Thus, studying galaxy shapes reveals information about both dark matter and dark energy.

The second method, called galaxy clustering or baryon acoustic oscillations, will serve as an independent measurement of dark energy. Early in the universe, galaxies were imprinted with a standard distance between them. This distance -- referred to as a standard ruler -- expands as the universe itself expands. By making precise measurements of the distances between tens of millions of galaxies, the scientists will be able to chart this expansion and learn more about the dark energy driving it. Observations of how the galaxies are clustered will also further probe dark matter.

The JPL-led U.S. science team will employ both of these methods and work together with the rest of the Euclid scientists to shine light on the darkest riddles of our cosmos. Of the 43 team members, six are based at JPL. They are: Olivier Doré, Peter Eisenhardt, Alina Kiessling, Leonidas Moustakas, Jason Rhodes and Daniel Stern. Two additional team members, Peter Capak and Harry Teplitz, are based at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center.

Mike Seiffert is the U.S. project scientist for Euclid at JPL, and Ulf Israelsson is the U.S. project manager at JPL.

Euclid is a European Space Agency mission with science instruments and data analysis provided by the Euclid consortium with important participation from NASA. NASA's Euclid Project Office is based at JPL. JPL will contribute the infrared flight detectors for one of Euclid's two science instruments. NASA Goddard will assist with infrared detector characterization and will perform detailed testing on flight detectors prior to delivery. Three U.S. science teams, led by JPL, Goddard and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech, will contribute to science planning and data analysis. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.

More information is online at http://www.nasa.gov/euclid and http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=102 .

Whitney Clavin 818-354-4673
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
whitney.clavin@jpl.nasa.gov

J.D. Harrington 202-358-5241
NASA Headquarters, Washington
j.d.harrington@nasa.gov
- end -
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Star One

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #9 on: 06/11/2013 04:39 PM »
The module carrying the telescope and scientific instruments of ESA’s Euclid ‘dark Universe’ mission is now being developed by Astrium in Toulouse, France.

Euclid will be launched in 2020 to explore dark energy and dark matter in order to understand the evolution of the Universe since the Big Bang and, in particular, its present accelerating expansion.

Dark matter is invisible to our normal telescopes but acts through gravity to play a vital role in forming galaxies and slowing the expansion of the Universe.

Dark energy, however, causes a force that is overcoming gravity and accelerating the expansion seen around us today.

Together, these two components are thought to comprise 95% of the mass and energy of the Universe, with ‘normal’ matter, from which stars, planets and we humans are made, making up the remaining small fraction. Their nature remains a profound mystery.

“Euclid will address the cosmology-themed questions of ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015–25 programme with advanced payload technologies, enabling Europe to become a world leader in this field of research,” says Thomas Passvogel, Head of the Project Department in ESA’s Directorate of Science and Robotic Exploration.


http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Euclid_to_probe_dark_Universe_with_Astrium_science_module

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #10 on: 06/18/2013 02:31 PM »
Astrium is awarded the Euclid Payload Module contract by ESA

11 june 2013

Astrium will provide a fully integrated Payload Module carrying a sophisticated telescope and instruments

Euclid Payload Module will deliver cutting edge science, mapping the geometry of the dark universe in unprecedented detail

The telescope builds on Astrium’s world-leading expertise in Silicon Carbide technology for space – already proven in orbit on ESA’s Herschel misión

http://www.astrium.eads.net/en/press_centre/astrium-is-awarded-the-euclid-payload-module.html

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #11 on: 07/02/2013 07:22 PM »
Thales Alenia Space wins prime contract for Europe’s Euclid cosmology satellite: link

Quote
The European Space Agency, ESA, has chosen Thales Alenia Space to build the new Euclid cosmology satellite in a contract worth €322.5 million.

Quote
ESA's selection of the satellite prime contractor follows its choice of the contractor for the payload module (PLM assigned to Astrium SAS of Toulouse)
« Last Edit: 12/17/2015 08:31 PM by bolun »

Offline Star One

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #12 on: 07/08/2013 05:23 PM »
8 July 2013
The construction of ESA’s Euclid space mission to explore the ‘dark Universe’ will be led by Italy’s Thales Alenia Space as prime contractor, beginning the full industrial phase of the project.

The announcement follows that of last month when Astrium Toulouse was confirmed to build the payload module – the telescope and optical bench carrying the science instruments.

Euclid will be launched in 2020 to explore the roles played by dark energy and dark matter in the evolution of the Universe since the Big Bang and, in particular, in its present accelerating expansion.

Dark matter is invisible to normal telescopes, but acts through gravity to play a vital part in forming galaxies and slowing the expansion of the Universe.

Dark energy, on the other hand, causes a force that overcomes gravity and that is accelerating the expansion seen around us today.

Together, they are thought to comprise 95% of the total amount of mass and energy in the Universe, with ‘normal’ matter – from which stars, planets and we humans are made – making up the remaining small fraction. But their nature remains a profound mystery.

“We are pleased to confirm the prime contractor for this exciting mission. With the support of European space industry, we are a step closer to revealing the darkest secrets of the Universe,” says Professor Alvaro Giménez, ESA’s Director of Science and Robotic Exploration.

“This is a long-awaited milestone after the mission concept was first proposed to ESA in 2007, and we are delighted to see that the spacecraft construction can now begin,” says Yannick Mellier, who leads the Euclid consortium, comprising scientists from 13 European countries and the US.

The consortium will provide Euclid’s two state-of-the art scientific instruments: a visible-light camera and a near-infrared camera/spectrometer. Together, they will map the 3D distribution of up to two billion galaxies spread over more than a third of the whole sky.

Light from the most distant galaxies streaming towards Earth is slightly bent by gravity as it interacts with matter along the way. This is dominated by dark matter, whether associated with galaxies and galaxy clusters, or in isolation. Thus, by measuring distortions in the shapes of those background galaxies, astronomers can construct a 3D map of the dark matter in the Universe.

Furthermore, by assessing how the distribution of galaxies and galaxy clusters has changed over cosmic time, scientists can infer the role and evolution of dark energy from the dawn of the Universe until today.

The results will help to answer one of the most important questions in modern cosmology: why is the Universe expanding at an accelerating rate today, rather than slowing down due to the gravitational attraction of all the matter in it?

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Thales_Alenia_Space_kicks_off_Euclid_construction

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #13 on: 12/02/2013 08:21 AM »

Multilateral agreements signed at SPC meeting

29 November 2013

Multilateral agreements for Euclid and Gaia have been signed at the Science Programme Committee meeting, held on 28 November 2013 at ESA Headquarters in Paris, France.

The Euclid MLA provides the legal framework for the provision of the scientific instruments and their elements for the Euclid payload, and the legal framework for part of the Science Ground Segment for Euclid.

http://sci.esa.int/cosmic-vision/53274-multilateral-agreements-signed-at-spc-meeting/

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #14 on: 01/16/2014 07:55 PM »
Good turnout for Euclid industry day at ESTEC

16 January 2014

ESA's European Space Research and Technology Centre, ESTEC, yesterday hosted more than 200 representatives of space industry at the spacecraft industry day for its Euclid mission. ESA and the Prime Contractor for Euclid, Thales Alenia Space, presented the mission, including its procurement plan and related business opportunities.

http://sci.esa.int/euclid/53608-good-turnout-for-euclid-industry-day-at-estec/

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #15 on: 12/17/2015 08:33 PM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Euclid_dark_Universe_mission_ready_to_take_shape

Euclid dark Universe mission ready to take shape

Quote
Euclid, ESA’s dark Universe mission, has passed its preliminary design review, providing confidence that the spacecraft and its payload can be built. It’s time to start ‘cutting metal’.

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #16 on: 02/08/2017 04:49 PM »
First Euclid flight hardware delivered

07 February 2017

An important milestone has been passed in the development of Euclid, a pioneering ESA mission to observe billions of faint galaxies and investigate the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The first flight hardware, in the form of four detectors known as Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), has been delivered to Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) by UK company e2v. The remaining flight CCDs (36 in total) for the visible imager (VIS) will be delivered to MSSL by June.

http://sci.esa.int/euclid/58777-first-euclid-flight-hardware-delivered/

Image credit:  e2v

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #17 on: 04/26/2017 11:41 AM »
A Euclid NISP detector

This picture shows one of the state-of-the-art detectors for Euclid's Near-Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer (NISP) instrument.

The NISP instrument will include 16 such detectors, each of them is composed of 2040 × 2040 pixels and is 18 microns in size.

NISP is developed under the responsibility of the Euclid Consortium, with CNES (the French space agency) and LAM / CPPM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and the Centre de Physique de Particules de Marseille) as the main contributors. Other institutes and industries across Europe – in France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Norway and Denmark – are also involved.

The NISP detectors were procured in the USA from Teledyne Imaging Sensors of Camarillo, California, the leader in the manufacture of near-infrared detectors used in astronomy.

The flight models were designed and procured by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. They were then tested in the detector lab at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center before being delivered to LAM / CPPM in France.

Related article: Detector delivery marks another Euclid milestone

http://sci.esa.int/euclid/59051-a-euclid-nisp-detector/

Image credit: CPPM

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #18 on: 10/19/2017 04:58 PM »
Flaws in NASA-provided detectors to delay European astronomy mission

Quote
WASHINGTON — Problems with infrared detectors provided by NASA will delay a European Space Agency astronomy mission, potentially by a year or more, a NASA official said Oct. 18.

Paul Hertz, director of NASA’s astrophysics division, said engineers found problems during recent testing of infrared detectors being provided by NASA for ESA’s Euclid space telescope, which had been planned for launch in 2020 on a Soyuz rocket from French Guiana.

“The detector systems that we had been developing for delivery for ESA has been failing in their characterization testing before delivery,” he said at a meeting of the Astrophysics Advisory Committee.

http://spacenews.com/flaws-in-nasa-provided-detectors-to-delay-european-astronomy-mission/

Offline as58

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Re: ESA - Euclid updates
« Reply #19 on: 10/19/2017 09:30 PM »
It's very fitting that after JWST was delayed (at least partly) because of ESA, NASA responds in kind by causing a delay to an ESA mission.

More seriously, this delay didn't come as a big surprise. From what i've heard, this instrument isn't the only part of the mission that could use a  few more months.

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