Author Topic: The Ariane 4 thread  (Read 9193 times)

Offline bolun

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The Ariane 4 thread
« on: 06/09/2012 11:49 AM »
Ariane 4

The Ariane 4 family was the workhorse of the commercial launch services industry during its service career from 1988 to 2003.

Using a "building block" approach, six Ariane versions were available – all of which were based on the same core three-stage vehicle.

Ariane 4 was the result of Europe's accurate forecasting of the future growth of satellite payload weight and size. To meet the predicted market needs, the flexible family approach was adopted.

The Ariane 4 family's payload lift performance to geostationary transfer orbit ranged from 2,000 kg. to 4,900 kg.

The Spaceport's ELA-2 launch complex supported the Ariane 4 vehicle family's fast-paced launch schedule from its service entry in 1986 through the final Ariane 4 mission in 2003.

The complex consised of two areas: the launcher preparation zone and the launch zone. These two areas were separated, allowing one launcher to undergo final checkout and payload integration in the launch zone while a second was being assembled in the launcher preparation zone.

ELA-2 was designed for approximately 10-11 launches per year with an interval of one month between successive missions. To meet commercial demand, Arianespace maintained a high operational mission rate throughout the Ariane 4 program.

http://www.arianespace.com/launch-services-ariane-heritage/Ariane-4.asp

http://www.arianespace.com/news-image_library/ariane_heritage.asp
« Last Edit: 06/09/2012 12:43 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #1 on: 06/09/2012 11:52 AM »
Ariane 4

Ariane 4 was justly known as the ‘workhorse’ of the Ariane family. Since its first flight on 15 June 1988 until the last, on 15 February 2003, it made 113 successful launches. The Ariane 4 proved ideal for launching communications and Earth observation satellites as well as those for scientific research.
This launcher was extremely versatile. The first stage could hold two or four strap-on boosters, or none at all. This meant that it could lift into orbit satellites weighing from 2000 to nearly 4300 kg in GTO, nearly three times as much as the Ariane-3 launcher.

During its working life, Ariane 4 captured 50% of the market in launching commercial satellites, showing that Europe can more than hold its own in the commercial launch field.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Launchers_Home/SEMU1E67ESD_0.html

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #2 on: 06/09/2012 11:59 AM »
Spare Ariane nose heads to new home
 
16 May 2012

A large piece of Europe’s retired Ariane 4 launcher left French Guiana last week on a long journey across the Atlantic for display in the Netherlands.
 
Under a collaboration between ESA and the Space Expo museum next to ESA’s ESTEC space research and technology centre, some Ariane 4 elements were set aside when the rocket’s launch complex was dismantled.

The payload fairing of half-shells was a flight-ready spare for the last Ariane 4 launch that took off in February 2003. 

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Launchers_Home/SEMKLAWW32H_0.html

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #3 on: 09/15/2012 08:11 PM »

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #4 on: 01/23/2014 09:03 PM »
http://www.dlr.de/100Jahre/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-3309/5158_read-7469/gallery-1/216_read-13/

An Ariane 44L ready for launch in Kourou, French Guiana. In addition to the main engine has four liquid strap-on boosters.

Image credit: Arianespace

Offline Jester

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #5 on: 01/23/2014 09:25 PM »
http://www.dlr.de/100Jahre/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-3309/5158_read-7469/gallery-1/216_read-13/

An Ariane 44L ready for launch in Kourou, French Guiana. In addition to the main engine has four liquid strap-on boosters.

Image credit: Arianespace

V-150 with NSS-7

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #6 on: 05/29/2014 09:46 AM »
http://www.cnes.fr/web/CNES-en/1378-ariane-4-a-challenge-for-europes-space-industry.php

First launch of Ariane 4 on June 15th, 1988.

Image Credit: CNES/ESA/Arianespace
« Last Edit: 05/29/2014 09:47 AM by bolun »

Offline Jester

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #7 on: 05/29/2014 12:01 PM »
http://www.cnes.fr/web/CNES-en/1378-ariane-4-a-challenge-for-europes-space-industry.php

First launch of Ariane 4 on June 15th, 1988.

Image Credit: CNES/ESA/Arianespace

V-22 with Meteosat-3/P2    PAS (PAN AM SAT) 1    Amsat P3C (Oscar 13)
« Last Edit: 05/29/2014 12:01 PM by Jester »

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #8 on: 08/12/2015 10:13 AM »
An Ariane 4 (44L) on the launchpad, 1989

Ariane 44L, the most powerful version of the Ariane 4 family, on the launchpad in Kourou, French Guiana, some hours before liftoff of of flight V34, carrying Intelsat VI-F2, in 1989.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2009/12/An_Ariane_4_44L_on_the_launchpad_1989

Image credit: ESA

Offline Jester

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #9 on: 08/12/2015 04:31 PM »
Here is the launch
« Last Edit: 08/12/2015 04:32 PM by Jester »

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #10 on: 10/22/2015 08:02 PM »
From https://twitter.com/DutchSpace/status/657102266726510592/photo/1

Launched 22 years ago, Ariane4 V60 with INTELSAT 701

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #11 on: 02/17/2016 11:34 AM »
15 February 2003: last Ariane 4 launch

The early morning launch on 15 February 2003 marked the final flight of an Ariane 4, and the 116th mission of this launcher version. On this, its last flight, it succesfully put into orbit a telecommunications satellite for Intelsat.

Ariane 4 entered service in 1988 and successfully orbited 158 primary payloads (plus 24 auxiliary passengers) with a combined mass of well over 400 tonnes.
Ariane 4 has been justly referred to as the ‘workhorse’ of the Ariane family. Since its first flight, V22 on 15 June 1988 it has made 113 successful launches. Ariane 4 has proved ideal for launching satellites for communications and Earth observation, as well as for scientific research.

This launcher was extremely versatile. The first stage could hold two or four strap-on boosters, or none at all. This meant that it could lift into orbit satellites weighing from 2000 to nearly 4800 kg in geostationary transfer orbit, nearly three times as much as its predecessor, the Ariane-3 launcher.
During its working life Ariane 4 captured 50% of the market in launching commercial satellites, showing that Europe can more than hold its own in the commercial launch market. Ariane-4's role will now be taken over by the Ariane-5 launcher.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2003/02/15_February_2003_last_Ariane_4_launch

Image credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace

Offline bolun

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #12 on: 04/04/2017 10:34 AM »
The Story of Ariane 4 (video)

http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2003/02/The_Story_of_Ariane_4

Quote
An historical look at the Ariane 4 launcher made prior to its final launch which took place successfully on 15 February 2003 from the Kourou space port in French Guiana. The programme composes of an A-Roll with split audio and English commentary and is complimented by a B-Roll with clean international sound.

Offline Kosmos2001

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #13 on: 04/04/2017 04:24 PM »
A very beautiful family of launchers. I miss them.  :'(

Offline Pipcard

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #14 on: 04/11/2017 10:58 PM »
Using a "building block" approach, six Ariane versions were available – all of which were based on the same core three-stage vehicle.

During its working life, Ariane 4 captured 50% of the market in launching commercial satellites, showing that Europe can more than hold its own in the commercial launch field.

And yet, having a lower amount of separate configurations is thought to be more competitive these days?
« Last Edit: 04/11/2017 10:59 PM by Pipcard »

Online woods170

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Re: The Ariane 4 thread
« Reply #15 on: 04/12/2017 07:31 AM »
Using a "building block" approach, six Ariane versions were available – all of which were based on the same core three-stage vehicle.

During its working life, Ariane 4 captured 50% of the market in launching commercial satellites, showing that Europe can more than hold its own in the commercial launch field.

And yet, having a lower amount of separate configurations is thought to be more competitive these days?
Ariane was capable of capturing 50% market share, despite the large number of configurations, because the USA gambled on space shuttle, and lost. By the time the US commercial launch market tried to get back on it's feet it was too late. A situation that only now is being corrected, mostly thru SpaceX.
And yes, a lower number of configurations is generally more competitive.

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