Author Topic: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A  (Read 21596 times)

Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #20 on: 03/07/2017 01:58 AM »
What is the typical(yes I know there is no such thing) ISS crew mission training time.

Mercury was very short, Gemini was longer, Apollo was 6-8 months. Shuttle-MIR about the same. Just throw me a reasonable number please, there should be enough historical data to support it. My research shows a variable of 8-10 months but I just think this too long.

ASTP and Skylab programs were very specific and don't fit the profile, please exclude them.

If you have data to support, I will accept Russian and European times as well. Seems like the EU gets quite a bit longer.
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Offline DreamlinerFinder

Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #21 on: 03/08/2017 06:27 PM »
Standard ISS Traning Flow is 2 years from assignment to flight is what I think. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #22 on: 03/09/2017 04:07 PM »
This time seems to include basic training and familiarization. I just want an average mission training profile. Most astronauts don't know their mission 2 years in advance.
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #23 on: 03/09/2017 05:42 PM »
It is about two years that ISS crews train.

Example: Alex Gerst second flight was announced in may 2016 and he will fly in may 2018.

Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #24 on: 03/09/2017 06:57 PM »
So Alex learned how to maintain ISS systems for his first flight, as well as his specific mission training.

Now he will get refresher training for maintenance of ISS systems, and additional mission specific training, two years in advance of his launch date. Very interesting.

Even as simple as ISS is, that's a lot of training for a 6 month mission. I wonder if NASA has a breakdown of historical missions, pre-launch mission training objectives, in a slide show or something. Post Mission briefs and mission status reports are easy to get.

Another request might be formal, mandatory, ISS systems maintenance Courses of Instruction(COI)s. These would have the number of hours needed for classroom and lab training for each major system.
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Offline Triptych

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #25 on: 03/23/2017 06:53 AM »
From reading the wikipedia entry, am I to believe that NASA does not designate the commander of their shuttles and such by "Captain"? Instead they use the term Commander, right?

My question is- if its a military spaceflight, like in the USAF for example, would they use the naval term as captain for commanding the rocket/shuttle, or would they stick with the NASA term of Commander?

Offline Jim

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #26 on: 03/23/2017 12:53 PM »
From reading the wikipedia entry, am I to believe that NASA does not designate the commander of their shuttles and such by "Captain"? Instead they use the term Commander, right?

My question is- if its a military spaceflight, like in the USAF for example, would they use the naval term as captain for commanding the rocket/shuttle, or would they stick with the NASA term of Commander?

It depends on who owns the spacecraft.  They get to name the titles of the personnel.

For multi crew aircraft, USAF calls the pilot in command, the aircraft commander.


« Last Edit: 03/23/2017 12:57 PM by Jim »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #27 on: 03/28/2017 09:44 AM »
While reading Hadfield's book, I noticed something interesting on page 110 (of the paperback edition).
Hadfield writes about his role as CAPCOM and working with other astronauts:


Quote
I worked with some difficult people, too, One particularly abrasive astronaut flew on several shuttle flights for which I was lead CAPCOM: we had to work together closely, particularly during the missions he commanded.

...except when I had to work with this guy. He was highly skilled, technically, but also arrogant and confrontational, the kind of person who regularly swore at me, berated me and told me in no uncertain terms that I was a bumbling fool.

And on page 111:

Quote
Once flying up to Washington in a NASA jet, I stopped to refuel and a military guy I'd never met before noticed the plane and said, Hey do you know _____? What an ******* !


 So who is this astronaut that Hadfield is talking about? It happened between Hadfield's first (STS-74) and second (STS-100) mission while he was working in MCC as CAPCOM, and that astronaut commanded shuttle flights.

Anyone has any idea?

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