Author Topic: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A  (Read 22617 times)

Offline dpkprm

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Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« on: 02/11/2011 10:13 AM »
Iam currently studying in High School. I have decided to take Aerospace in my higher education. I would like to end up as as Astronaut and so I went through the requirements of astronaut published by NASA.

  Iam good at Maths, Physics and i maintain the perfect height and weight. sooner i would also gain my pilot's licence. I have no abnormalities in my body except for my eye.

  I lack 6/6 vision and Iam wearing spectacles. But I have seen the photos of many astronauts working with spectacles in space...so does it really matters ?????? does wearing spectacles may be a reason to make me fail in their tests ??????     

I Have actually attached a picture of an astronaut wearing glasses......                       
« Last Edit: 02/12/2011 04:17 PM by Andy USA »

Offline JohnF

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #1 on: 02/11/2011 10:54 AM »
Pretty basic really, take Aerospace Engineering in college, high grade point average would be nice, join Air Force or Navy for pilot training, attain highest grades possible to get fighters, have the best/most hours you can get flying, after a few years apply to NASA to be an astronaut, piece of cake.

Offline dpkprm

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #2 on: 02/11/2011 11:05 AM »
but what about the "6/6 vision" part ????

Offline tigerade

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #3 on: 02/11/2011 11:18 AM »
Pretty basic really, take Aerospace Engineering in college, high grade point average would be nice, join Air Force or Navy for pilot training, attain highest grades possible to get fighters, have the best/most hours you can get flying, after a few years apply to NASA to be an astronaut, piece of cake.

That actually sounds pretty difficult.   :P

Quote
but what about the "6/6 vision" part ????

I'm sure he's referring to the metric system. 

Offline ddunham

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #4 on: 02/11/2011 04:55 PM »
Anything in particular you want to do as an astronaut?

I think the hardest thing with the vision would be if you want to be a pilot.  I believe the Air Force/Navy have strict vision requirements for their pilot recruits.  It wouldn't keep you out of civilian flying, but that's a (much) slower road to build up expertise.

But not all astronauts are pilots.  There have been lots of researchers and scientists that applied and became astronauts.

Go plan for and do something you'd love even if you never got selected as an astronaut.  Some folks go 10 years or more after first applying before being selected to join. 

Offline Antares

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #5 on: 02/11/2011 05:26 PM »
SCUBA, EMT training help too.  Anything that's a skill that could be used in space or like a skill that could be used in space.

Edit to add pilot's license as well.
« Last Edit: 02/12/2011 09:49 PM by Antares »
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline majormajor42

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #6 on: 02/11/2011 08:05 PM »
Back in the 90s, the US military wasn't allowing corrective eye surgery for flight school candidates.  This has changed.  I'm sure there are limits to how bad the eyes can be before surgery takes place.  Top of the class graduates from the federal academies are offered to get the corrective surgery for free if they commit to flight school and the extended service commitment that goes with it.

Since you are already a senior in High School, it might be too late to gain admittance to a federal academy but ROTC might still be an option.

Frankly, the future looks very different than it did a few years back.  With all these commercial space operators, there might be opportunities in space besides NASA (and other gov't programs).

Good Luck.

then there is also the Story Musgrave route to space.  Get about half a dozen PhD's, including an MD. I actually think there might be a greater need for MDs in space than aerospace engineers (and even pilots).  MDs might be better at conducting science than other professions and surgery may be similar to EVA maintenance on spacecraft.
...water is life and it is out there, where we intend to go. I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man or machine on a body such as the Moon and harvest a cup of water for a human to drink or process into fuel for their craft.

Offline Danny Dot

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #7 on: 02/12/2011 04:12 PM »
To the best of my knowledge all pilot astronauts are former test pilots, and your vision will probably keep you out of military aviation.  I am not sure about vision to become a mission specialist.  It will probably be a problem.  I also don't think engineering is the best degree to become a mission specialist.  A PHD in a different field is probably better.  Look at the bios on line to see what degrees the MS's have.

Good luck to you.
Danny Deger

Offline HIPAR

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #8 on: 02/12/2011 04:30 PM »
Academics and physical attributes aside, you must project a likable personal image during public forums.

---  CHAS
 

Offline Jorge

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #9 on: 02/12/2011 04:30 PM »
NASA allows PRK and LASIK now. Details here:

http://nasajobs.nasa.gov/astronauts/content/broch00.htm
JRF

Offline Downix

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #10 on: 02/12/2011 08:10 PM »
The exact requirements is that, for non-pilot astronauts, your vision needs to be able to be correctable to normal.  Glasses, Lasik, whatever.  (I looked it up last week)
chuck - Toilet paper has no real value? Try living with 5 other adults for 6 months in a can with no toilet paper. Man oh man. Toilet paper would be worth it's weight in gold!

Offline Space Pete

Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #11 on: 02/12/2011 09:30 PM »
It's very easy to run away with the "qualifications is everything" line of thinking. Qualifications are a large part of becoming an astronaut, but they are not everything. If they were, NASA would simply select the top 15 most qualified applicants from every group, and hire them.

But they don't. They insist on doing interviews first. And, in every group, PhDs are beaten to the post by "mere" MScs. That's because you need many qualities and attributes to become an astronaut. Qualifications may get you in the door for an interview, but whether you come out with a job offer is dependant entirely on other things.

Those other things include things like leadership qualities, the ability to work well with others, even if you don't know them all that well. Being flexible to others and having a likeable personality is important. Being articulate in the interview is important, as part of your job as an astronaut will be to communicate effectively with the public. Hint: Don't use the phrase "like, you know" in an astronaut interview! :D

How well can you cope in stressful situations, how well can you survive away from your loved ones is also important (and if you question the need for that, just look at the recent events surrounding the Kelly brothers). The ability to survive away from home for a long time is going to become increasingly important in future missions beyond LEO.

All of the above skills are actually harder to acquire than a qualification is, as you can't simply get a piece of to say you can do it. Joining the military will help you acquire those kind of skills. If you don't go the military route, NASA generally like people to have outside interests where these kinds of skills are involved.

I'm not saying that qualifications aren't important, of course they are. Just make sure to acquire a wide range of skills & abilities to compliment them.

Good luck, and hopefully I'll see you on the far side of Phobos! ;D
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline TeacherFromMars

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #12 on: 12/05/2015 05:53 PM »
Hi! I'm part of a team that's working on a children's book about a substitute teacher from Mars (hence the username) who attempts to educate her Earth students on the imaginative, wonderful idiosyncrasies of space, and eventually takes them on a field trip to the ISS. We're hoping to inspire some interest in outer space with this, get the curiosity of kids piqued and all that. You can view the Kickstarter (which we've yet to launch—pun not intended) here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/toonutsproductions/873272293?token=42702f50

The aforementioned field trip part of the story is what we need some help with. We want to be accurate when we update the text with this new addition, so we're left with questions that hopefully some of you can help us with. (A few of these may seem obvious, but since we're not astronauts or space geniuses, we have no idea.) Here's what we're wondering:

-- When they consider full capacity of the interior (just like the F.D. posts a full capacity sign near the exit of a restaurant or bar), do they factor in 'standing people' or 'floating people'? Because I would think that someone floating horizontal takes up more room than someone standing. And I'm sure air and water and food are certainly other considerations.

-- What do the astronauts do onboard for amusement? They can't be working 24/7, presumably.  Do they get a day off like on Earth?

-- Does the ISS come with a 'Panic Button'?

-- Do the astronauts receive any training on how to deal with alien visitors were that to become necessary?

-- Do they have private lockers?

-- Is there any device on board which is the least important to the functioning of the space station but you can't leave Earth without it?

-- Are there any personal effects that they're not allowed to take with them?

-- When they speak to their loved ones on Earth, do they use a private channel? How much does a 'space call' cost?

-- Who makes the final call in matters of dispute? Like, what happens if a fight breaks out?

-- For those astronauts who have kids, especially in elementary school, do any of their kids get picked on because mom or dad are in space? Do their kids have to work overtime to convince their peers that their mom or dad is actually in space?

-- If an astronaut has to go outside for a space walk to perform maintenance does the selection of who goes out depend on what day it is or who went out the last time?

-- Since the ISS is spinning around the Earth something on order of 17 times a day (is that correct?), how do they calibrate day and night, like what hemisphere do they use for referral? Because it may be 12 p.m. Wednesday at Houston, but as the ISS is talking to Houston, they've probably passed through five time zones in 10 minutes. So whose time do they go by? And does that even matter?

-- Is there anything they're not allowed to take with them when they travel to the ISS?

Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #13 on: 12/06/2015 01:23 AM »
"-- Is there anything they're not allowed to take with them when they travel to the ISS?"
"-- Are there any personal effects that they're not allowed to take with them?"

Yes, If it cannot pass the sniff test, it cannot fly. See Mysteries at the museum, and several Discovery specials on the subject. An astronaut wanted to take a collection of CDs with him, he could not. The CDs as a collection could not pass the sniff test. An MP3 player with the same music was later approved.

NASA has a special employee just for this job... https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=NASA+sniff+tester


"-- When they consider full capacity of the interior (just like the F.D. posts a full capacity sign near the exit of a restaurant or bar), do they factor in 'standing people' or 'floating people'? Because I would think that someone floating horizontal takes up more room than someone standing. And I'm sure air and water and food are certainly other considerations"

Many resources are considered. Actual dimensions of persons aboard falls far down the list. Several astronauts have commented on the abundance of the available space to person ratio aboard ISS. NASA uses a Manned Space Craft Design Reference Guide as a sort of checklist to monitor the persons to resources ratio, duration of flight, and practical application of those resources.

The ISS is very roomy when compared to the space craft used to ferry them to and from.

Google is your students best friend.
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Offline Graham

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #14 on: 12/06/2015 01:54 AM »
-- What do the astronauts do onboard for amusement? They can't be working 24/7, presumably.  Do they get a day off like on Earth?
They do get days off. They can read books, watch movies, listen to music, or just look out the window.
-- Do they have private lockers?
They have their own sleeping quarters that they can decorate with pictures and store personal effects in.
-- Who makes the final call in matters of dispute? Like, what happens if a fight breaks out?
Well all astronauts and cosmosnauts are highly trained and professional individuals, so a fight would never break out, but if there is some kind of conflict the station commander would likely be the one to resolve it. Decisions related to the operation of the station are typically not made by the CDR, but rather by a group of ground controllers.
-- If an astronaut has to go outside for a space walk to perform maintenance does the selection of who goes out depend on what day it is or who went out the last time?
Each crew has astronauts trained for EVA. There are certain ones that would be first up to go since they trained more for it, but anyone could if there was a need for it.
-- Since the ISS is spinning around the Earth something on order of 17 times a day (is that correct?), how do they calibrate day and night, like what hemisphere do they use for referral? Because it may be 12 p.m. Wednesday at Houston, but as the ISS is talking to Houston, they've probably passed through five time zones in 10 minutes. So whose time do they go by? And does that even matter?
The station uses Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), aka Zulu time. The crew operates on this time, it doesn't matter so much for ground controllers, they just have to come into work at weird hours.
I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night
- Sarah Williams

Offline Danderman

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #15 on: 01/19/2016 10:24 PM »
This appears to be the ISS Q&A topic, so I will ask an easy one:

Doesn't ISS have some sort of S-Band comm system, apart from the KU band system on the truss? What is the name of the system and where is it the antenna located? And what is its' function?
« Last Edit: 01/19/2016 10:25 PM by Danderman »

Offline Jim

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #16 on: 01/20/2016 12:19 AM »
This appears to be the ISS Q&A topic, so I will ask an easy one:

Doesn't ISS have some sort of S-Band comm system, apart from the KU band system on the truss? What is the name of the system and where is it the antenna located? And what is its' function?


S-Band Communications System, Z1 truss and voice comm

Offline Danderman

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #17 on: 01/20/2016 02:57 PM »
I gather than the S-Band Communications system is a voice link, but does it serve in this capacity as a backup to the KU band system so that it used sparingly? What ground station network supports this link?

There is surprisingly little about the S-band system on the Internet.

Offline Jim

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #18 on: 01/20/2016 03:00 PM »
I gather than the S-Band Communications system is a voice link, but does it serve in this capacity as a backup to the KU band system so that it used sparingly? What ground station network supports this link?

There is surprisingly little about the S-band system on the Internet.


Sband is the primary voice link and station housekeeping and uses TDRSS

Offline darkenfast

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #19 on: 01/25/2016 05:11 AM »
TeacherFromMars, I think that it is a wonderful thought you have to write this book.  I also think, from the questions you ask, that you are in over your head in regards to the nature of what goes on up there.  These days, kids grow up in ways we older people can't even fathom, because of the internet.   If a book about space exploration is to have an educational effect, it has to stay ahead of what the kids can find out on the internet in a few minutes.  If they are too young now, they won't be very shortly. 

First, learn the basic physics of space travel.  It's not like ANYTHING you will see in a Sci-Fi movie.  Next, spend a lot of hours watching videos from the last few years made on the Station.  The Astronauts and Cosmonauts on-board spend part of their time in educational activities.  You can watch them going to bed, making lunch, demonstrating how the zero-g toilet works and so on.  This is a wonderful resource.

In theater (my area of expertise), we have a thing called "willing suspension of dis-belief".  This is the agreement between the audience and the actor/director/designers that the audience will, for instance, accept that the three-sided set in front of them is a four-sided apartment, or that the Genii really can grant wishes.  Decide what the agreement is with your young readers.  Will they believe in your Station, or that the teacher has come from a low-gravity planet, and is going to take them up to the Station?  What year is it?  Mars won't be settled from a couple of decades (and then, only if we're lucky).  Today's ISS and tomorrow's Mars colony are separated in time. If the book is a happy-go-lucky romp that doesn't need to take account of the real world much, then maybe you won't have too much trouble, but if it's an educational book about the real nature of space travel, then you need some help.

I think that a team writing a book like this needs to find a local technical adviser who really understands space travel and and can sit down with you and help you develop the imaginary world that your characters will live in.

Good luck with your project!

Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #20 on: 03/07/2017 01:58 AM »
What is the typical(yes I know there is no such thing) ISS crew mission training time.

Mercury was very short, Gemini was longer, Apollo was 6-8 months. Shuttle-MIR about the same. Just throw me a reasonable number please, there should be enough historical data to support it. My research shows a variable of 8-10 months but I just think this too long.

ASTP and Skylab programs were very specific and don't fit the profile, please exclude them.

If you have data to support, I will accept Russian and European times as well. Seems like the EU gets quite a bit longer.
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Offline DreamlinerFinder

Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #21 on: 03/08/2017 06:27 PM »
Standard ISS Traning Flow is 2 years from assignment to flight is what I think. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #22 on: 03/09/2017 04:07 PM »
This time seems to include basic training and familiarization. I just want an average mission training profile. Most astronauts don't know their mission 2 years in advance.
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #23 on: 03/09/2017 05:42 PM »
It is about two years that ISS crews train.

Example: Alex Gerst second flight was announced in may 2016 and he will fly in may 2018.

Offline Darren_Hensley

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #24 on: 03/09/2017 06:57 PM »
So Alex learned how to maintain ISS systems for his first flight, as well as his specific mission training.

Now he will get refresher training for maintenance of ISS systems, and additional mission specific training, two years in advance of his launch date. Very interesting.

Even as simple as ISS is, that's a lot of training for a 6 month mission. I wonder if NASA has a breakdown of historical missions, pre-launch mission training objectives, in a slide show or something. Post Mission briefs and mission status reports are easy to get.

Another request might be formal, mandatory, ISS systems maintenance Courses of Instruction(COI)s. These would have the number of hours needed for classroom and lab training for each major system.
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Offline Triptych

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #25 on: 03/23/2017 06:53 AM »
From reading the wikipedia entry, am I to believe that NASA does not designate the commander of their shuttles and such by "Captain"? Instead they use the term Commander, right?

My question is- if its a military spaceflight, like in the USAF for example, would they use the naval term as captain for commanding the rocket/shuttle, or would they stick with the NASA term of Commander?

Offline Jim

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #26 on: 03/23/2017 12:53 PM »
From reading the wikipedia entry, am I to believe that NASA does not designate the commander of their shuttles and such by "Captain"? Instead they use the term Commander, right?

My question is- if its a military spaceflight, like in the USAF for example, would they use the naval term as captain for commanding the rocket/shuttle, or would they stick with the NASA term of Commander?

It depends on who owns the spacecraft.  They get to name the titles of the personnel.

For multi crew aircraft, USAF calls the pilot in command, the aircraft commander.


« Last Edit: 03/23/2017 12:57 PM by Jim »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Shuttle - ISS - Astronaut Q&A
« Reply #27 on: 03/28/2017 09:44 AM »
While reading Hadfield's book, I noticed something interesting on page 110 (of the paperback edition).
Hadfield writes about his role as CAPCOM and working with other astronauts:


Quote
I worked with some difficult people, too, One particularly abrasive astronaut flew on several shuttle flights for which I was lead CAPCOM: we had to work together closely, particularly during the missions he commanded.

...except when I had to work with this guy. He was highly skilled, technically, but also arrogant and confrontational, the kind of person who regularly swore at me, berated me and told me in no uncertain terms that I was a bumbling fool.

And on page 111:

Quote
Once flying up to Washington in a NASA jet, I stopped to refuel and a military guy I'd never met before noticed the plane and said, Hey do you know _____? What an ******* !


 So who is this astronaut that Hadfield is talking about? It happened between Hadfield's first (STS-74) and second (STS-100) mission while he was working in MCC as CAPCOM, and that astronaut commanded shuttle flights.

Anyone has any idea?

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