Author Topic: Orbits Q&A  (Read 117214 times)

Offline Proponent

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #320 on: 03/05/2017 09:30 AM »
Pioneer P-30

You mean the failed 1960 Atlas-Able lunar probe?  You're gonna have to explain that one....  Was its lunar-orbit-insertion engine ignited before it fell back to Earth?
« Last Edit: 03/05/2017 09:30 AM by Proponent »

Offline Jim

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #321 on: 03/05/2017 12:30 PM »
Pioneer P-30

You mean the failed 1960 Atlas-Able lunar probe?  You're gonna have to explain that one....  Was its lunar-orbit-insertion engine ignited before it fell back to Earth?

Actually, it doesn't matter.  Got a better one. 
Transit 1B  Thor Able-Star

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #322 on: 03/05/2017 07:33 PM »
Transit 1B  Thor Able-Star

Yes, indeed, Ablestar made the first engine restart.

But it is not really a "maneuvering satellite"...
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Offline as58

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #323 on: 03/22/2017 12:38 PM »
I noticed this question about an equation appearing in Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow on mathoverflow. Does anyone recognise the equation as something related to rocketry?

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #324 on: 12/09/2017 01:18 AM »
Earth to Mars launch widows occur every 26 months (780 days).

What about the Earth return launch window? Is that also every 780 days, or another value? 


"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Ultrafamicom

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #325 on: 02/15/2018 04:31 AM »
May anyone do a calculation on how much can FH launch  to a Jupiter direct transfer orbit with Boosters ASDS landing and central core expended ?  Much thanks :P

(My estimation is some 5-6 tons, based on the TMI performance on official website and Musk's twitter https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/963094533830426624 But when using the 3500kg to Pluto capacity figure,it gives me an astonishing 9-10t, which is obviously counter-intuitive)
« Last Edit: 02/15/2018 04:40 AM by Ultrafamicom »

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #326 on: 02/15/2018 05:05 AM »
Direct transfer to Jupiter is really high energy. Without stretching the upper stage and perhaps using a kick stage, FH would get very little payload even if fully expendable.
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Offline Ultrafamicom

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #327 on: 02/15/2018 05:21 AM »
Direct transfer to Jupiter is really high energy. Without stretching the upper stage and perhaps using a kick stage, FH would get very little payload even if fully expendable.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohmann_transfer_orbit

according to the table in this page, Pluto direct transfer requires even far higher energy(2.1km/s delta-v more), but Musk has confirmed FH can do a direct insertion. Even if the direct-to-Pluto payload is as little as 500kg, given the 348s Isp and 4.5-5t dry mass of S2, it can still be converted into about 5 tons of payload to Jupiter.

Online Demidrol

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #328 on: 02/15/2018 09:17 AM »
Direct transfer to Jupiter is really high energy. Without stretching the upper stage and perhaps using a kick stage, FH would get very little payload even if fully expendable.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohmann_transfer_orbit
according to the table in this page, Pluto direct transfer requires even far higher energy
A Hohmann transfer orbit is not a direct transfer orbit - https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-hohmann-transfer

Offline Ultrafamicom

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Re: Orbits Q&A
« Reply #329 on: 02/15/2018 09:35 AM »
Direct transfer to Jupiter is really high energy. Without stretching the upper stage and perhaps using a kick stage, FH would get very little payload even if fully expendable.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohmann_transfer_orbit
according to the table in this page, Pluto direct transfer requires even far higher energy
A Hohmann transfer orbit is not a direct transfer orbit - https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-hohmann-transfer
Sorry, I intended to mean heading for Jupiter without gravity assist by "direct"...

So any idea on FH's capacity to Hohmann transfer orbit to Jupiter?

Tags: inclination