Author Topic: Spaceflight Magazine  (Read 82473 times)

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #160 on: 10/10/2016 02:22 PM »
"I would have thought that's because such publications are for members only not the wider public."

That is true... and that approach was sensible a few decades ago, but it is absolutely useless today.  The Planetary Society would be nothing if all it did was mail its Planetary Report out to members, but it has a huge audience online and the influence which comes from that.

Offline Star One

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #161 on: 10/10/2016 03:04 PM »
"I would have thought that's because such publications are for members only not the wider public."

That is true... and that approach was sensible a few decades ago, but it is absolutely useless today.  The Planetary Society would be nothing if all it did was mail its Planetary Report out to members, but it has a huge audience online and the influence which comes from that.

But they sell that publication as part of its subscription so it might be related to that perhaps.

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #162 on: 10/10/2016 10:34 PM »
"I would have thought that's because such publications are for members only not the wider public."

That is true... and that approach was sensible a few decades ago, but it is absolutely useless today.  The Planetary Society would be nothing if all it did was mail its Planetary Report out to members, but it has a huge audience online and the influence which comes from that.

But they sell that publication as part of its subscription so it might be related to that perhaps.

Yeah, it's related, but Phil is right about The Planetary Society as well--TPS has bloggers who make The Planetary Society visible and timely. Plus, Bill Nye is always out in public, using his fame to promote TPS (a friend who works with him says that Nye has always been a trooper; if they ask him to go promote TPS he will do so).

BIS could really benefit from a well-known science celebrity helping to publicize them. But you have to have one who is really willing to work it, and that's rare.

Offline Stellvia

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #163 on: 10/10/2016 11:59 PM »
Haven’t seen the Cold War Military Space History (published by the BIS) since August 2006, got any new ones planned?

No, I gave up on that. BIS has a lousy web presence and they don't put the journal on the internet. That really restricts the audience. Also, their stuff has stopped showing up in reference collections and elsewhere. For all intents and purposes JBIS does not exist.

Also, we get very little feedback in this field. Nobody really seems to care. So it's difficult to develop enthusiasm to do the work when there's no indication that it is appreciated or even read. I still write military space history articles, but I don't have the ambition to try to put together special journal editions on them anymore.

I would have thought that's because such publications are for members only not the wider public.

The journal also used to go to libraries, but many of them stopped carrying it. BIS really needs to put their publications online. At one time it used to be that writing for them actually was prestigious and meant something. But that is no longer true. And the reality is that somebody can shove an article based entirely upon a half dozen books onto a blog and people will think it is great, and it will get thousands of views, while heavily researched stuff does not get seen because BIS has lousy web presence.

Hi, I'm deputy editor and webmaster for JBIS.

The journal website at http://www.jbis.org.uk/ is something I put together myself after being handed a stack of several hundred PDFs and being told to "put them online". It's... not great, I'll freely admit, but it does provide online access to papers from 1999-2016. There is an improved JBIS website in the works, and plans (and equipment) to scan all the JBIS back catalogue from 1934 onwards.

We're aware of the problems with library collections, science citation indexes etc. and we're working on them, but it will take a while. The main issue is lack of resources (financial and human). The online presence is an unfunded volunteer effort, and none of us are professional designers (I know, it shows...).

Constructive comments are welcomed. I'm not in charge of the "lousy web presence" of the BIS main site at http://www.bis-space.com/ but I know the guy who is, and I'll pass on any comments.

As far as 'Cold War Military Space History' is concerned, I will raise that specifically with BIS management.
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Offline gwiz

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #164 on: 10/11/2016 10:42 AM »
Well, the Spaceflight editor has just published a book on the subject, so there ought to be interest.

Offline Flying Spaghetti Monster

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #165 on: 10/30/2016 08:02 PM »
I would not despair, for as time progresses new articles and papers get published (whether on-line, or in hard copy periodicals) on a wide variety of subjects and topics relating to US and Russian (as well as other nations') space exploration history and about historiographical modes and methods--it's just a matter of patience.  Whether in European, Asian, or North American publications. 

Coming in 2017, there should be some new published materials appearing in BIS-linked publications on "Cold War Military Space History"....it's a good bet, based on on-going trends.  Both US, and Russian, efforts.


Offline apogeeperigee

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #166 on: 11/03/2016 09:47 AM »
I am looking for a specific article that I am told was in an old edition of Spaceflight, focusing on the Astronaut Support Crews during Apollo.  Does anyone know of this?  Does anyone know the title of it at least?

Thanks all!

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #167 on: 11/07/2016 03:38 PM »
Spaceflight Vol 58 No 12 – December 2016


The Eyes Have It!
Added to multiple concerns about the health risks of long duration weightlessness, evidence is now growing that long-term and sometimes permanent damage to the ocular system is being seen as astronauts spend more time in space.

Mexico hosts IAC 2016
David Todd sampled the mood at the 67th International Astronautical Congress and reports for Spaceflight on the atmosphere at this annual gathering of space officials, dignitaries and personalities.

Musk on Mars
Following in the tradition of some of the great space visionaries of the past, Elon Musk has outlined a grand plan for colonisation of Mars and envisages vast fleets of giant space liners to achieve his dream.

What future for human space flight?
Nick Spall previews the key decisions vital for sustained commitment to UK participation in human space flight coming up at the Ministerial meeting in Europe in December.

America’s First Rocket Company
Celebrated space historian Frank H. Winter remembers the 75th anniversary of Reaction Motors Incorporated, the first US rocket company.

New Paths to Mars
Andrew Jackson reports on the 19th annual conference of the Mars Society in Washington DC and reflects on the various proposals discussed.

http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2016/spaceflight-vol-58-no-12-december-2016/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #168 on: 12/13/2016 11:20 AM »
Spaceflight Vol 59 No 01 – January 2017

Trump on Space
With the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the USA and an all-Republican Congress, the Editor looks at prospects for the space programme under the new administration

ISS Rescoped
The Russians are downsizing their presence on the ISS so how does the manifest look for 2017?

To Mars via HoloLens
Buzz Aldrin has helped launch a new virtual experience at the Kennedy Space Center. Is this the way for Earthlings to experience Mars?

Webb Telescope optics complete!
With two years to go before launch, the mirror is complete on the world’s biggest space telescope.

German women for space
The search is on to find the first woman astronaut from Germany, with finalists vying for a seat on a Soyuz.

The Big One is Coming!
With increasing attention to the risk from Near Earth Objects, just how is the impact probability assessed?

Massimino on the Road
Rick Mulheirn caught up with retired astronaut Mike Massimino to find out what motivates him and what he is planning to do now.

Icarus Spacecraft Designs – Part 2
Peter Milne brings us up to date with continuing activity on starship studies with coverage of Resolution, Zeus and IDD designs.

http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2017/spaceflight-vol-59-no-01-january-2017/

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #169 on: 01/07/2017 01:03 PM »
Bigger version of the cover.

I have an article about JWST testing in the March issue, which was submitted back in early December before the vibration testing problem was revealed. So there might be a couple of things I refer to in the past tense that might be a bit premature. You know, wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey...
« Last Edit: 01/07/2017 01:03 PM by Blackstar »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #170 on: 01/09/2017 12:47 PM »
Spaceflight Vol 59 No 02 – February 2017


German female astronauts
Having introduced the competition to find Germany’s first woman astronaut in last month’s issue of Spaceflight, Tony Quine now provides brief biographical details on the candidates.

Remembering Apollo 1
Fifty years on from America’s first catastrophe in a manned spacecraft, the Editor looks again at the tragic circum-stances which led to the loss of three astronauts and to the wider repercussions.

Humans in Space – an Update
In this age of political convulsions Spaceflight reviews the changes and the challenges now facing protagonists of human space missions and asks whether it is not time to renew links with the commercial world.

STRAWMAN – The Deep Black Signals Intelligence Satellite
Intelligence analyst and specialist Dwayne Day opens the books on a class of satellite which served both tactical and strategic interests during the chilly days of the Cold War.

Volker Lieberg
Renowned Belgian space historian and archivist Theo Pirard speaks with the outgoing head of ESA’s Earth observa-tion satellite programmes and discusses the development of the integrated pan-European programme.


http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2017/spaceflight-vol-59-no-02-february-2017/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #171 on: 02/21/2017 11:40 AM »
Spaceflight Vol 59 No 03 – March 2017


Region in a future Mars colony?
Konrad Szocik examines whether a permanently isolated colony on Mars will choose to have a religion based upon new and reconsidered philosophy of purpose, or whether the conventions of Earth-based colonisation will no longer apply.

Rosetta - Ice and origins
New studies of the Rosetta mission reveal high quantities of carbon dioxide ice while other researchers place the origin of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in the outer reaches of the solar system where the Kuiper belt resides.

The Kelly Twins
Rick Mulheirn takes the Kelly Twins in hand and describes an evening in which they discuss all aspects of their space activities at another stunning Space Lectures event.

Where no bullets fly
Spaceflight takes a look at the threats to civilian satellites from a diversification of intelligence gathering assets now providing instant information overlain with sensory data from ordinary citizens as they go about their daily lives.

Gold plated monster – JWST nears completion
Dwayne A. Day took time to check out the latest assembly and test stages for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope at the Goddard Space Flight Center, finding it entering the next phase of tests.

http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2017/spaceflight-vol-59-no-03-march-2017/

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #172 on: 02/21/2017 04:00 PM »
Gold plated monster – JWST nears completion
Dwayne A. Day took time to check out the latest assembly and test stages for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope at the Goddard Space Flight Center, finding it entering the next phase of tests.

The perils of long lead-times...

I wrote that back in December and got page proofs on it almost immediately. They were locking down the issue then (normally, they would lock March down in late January). So it includes some statements about the planned move of the JWST hardware. The mirror assembly would normally be getting ready to ship down to Houston about now.

Unfortunately, they ran into a problem during testing in early December. Even now, February 21, the mirror assembly is not back in the clean room:

https://jwst.nasa.gov/webcam.html

So my article mentions a move that has not yet happened, but will probably take place in the next six weeks or so.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #173 on: 03/25/2017 09:07 AM »
Spaceflight Vol 59 No 04 – April 2017


The birth of Cape Canaveral
Joel W. Powell has long had an interest in the origins and development of the Cape Canaveral facilities and again shares with us another chapter in the history of this remarkable place, from where the first US satellites were launched and from where early rocket tests took place.

Modelling the ISS
Keith McNeill shares with us his extraordinary effort at building a model of the International Space Station. Combined with masterful skills at making miniature modules and trusses, Keith brings great talent to bear with his photographic expertise.

ESA’s spaceplane at T+25 years
Luc van den Abeelen looks back to European aspirations for an autonomous spaceplane capable of carrying astronauts into space and conducting research experiments in microgravity conditions, re-examining the Hermes programme and its many vicissitudes.

http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2017/spaceflight-vol-59-no-04-april-2017/

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #174 on: 03/25/2017 01:06 PM »
The images of the model of the ISS are pretty impressive.

Offline Hog

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #175 on: 03/26/2017 03:27 PM »
The images of the model of the ISS are pretty impressive.
Impressive enough to give a "like"?
Paul

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #176 on: 04/21/2017 02:50 PM »
Spaceflight Vol 59 No 05 – May 2017


NASA’s latest women astronauts
Dr Neil Da Costa begins our special selection of features about women in space with a review of the four women astronauts selected in 2013 but who became eligible for flight assignment in 2015. They were part of the first group chosen by NASA equally divided in number between men and women.

German Female Astronaut Initiative
Tony Quine tracks the continuing activity to find a single candidate for sending a German woman astronaut to space, with the six finalists now waiting for the next phase of the competition.

Hidden Figures
Robin Tucker reports on the film “Hidden Figures” and the aspirational use of the story about African-American women in NASA’s Mercury programme. Used by 20th Century Fox to encourage more girls to select STEM subjects for school and university, Robin shows how simulating stories such as this can have a very real motivational effect.

Speedmaster for space!
Philip Corneille makes a welcome return to Spaceflight, bringing us the fascinating story of Omega, space-rated watches and the unique, but largely ignored part they play in the story of the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo mis-sions.

UK Space on the Up
Co-founder of Nebula Sciences Ltd, Samuel Harrison provides an insightful reflection on the progress being made to place the UK at the very centre of international space activities through its science and engineering teams across the country.

http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2017/spaceflight-vol-59-no-05-may-2017/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #177 on: 05/17/2017 09:50 AM »
Spaceflight Vol 59 No 06 – June 2017


Blue Origin: Star Trek Reality
Gerard van der Haar and Luc van den Abeelen get inside the secretive Blue Origin company and dig deep into the aspirations of founder Jeff Bezos to explain his long-term plans and new launch vehicles.

Lunar Mission One
Some 45 years after the most recent human footprints were left on the Moon, plans are under way to send robot-ic surveyors to the lunar surface – and a personal digital box! Founder David Irons explains.

Cruising the Kuiper Belt
With a breath-taking fly-by of Pluto behind them, mission planners are targeting the New Horizons spacecraft for more encounters to come as it cruises deeper into this enigmatic region of the solar system.

Revelations from Rosetta
The comet has gone and with it further operations with the Rosetta spacecraft and the Philae lander but scientists are getting to grips with a fascinating story of change on the surface of a transient visitor.

TRAPPIST-1: Destination or Deceiver?
The recent announcement that there is a family of planets around the star TRAPPIST-1 sent speculation soaring that a mini solar system might harbour life. But all is not as it might at first seem.

Expeditions to the Outer Planets
Interest is growing in the role played by Uranus and Neptune as the dramatic part they played in organising the structure of our solar system becomes clearer, with some scientists calling for new missions.

Gateways to Mars?
NASA has an objective to send humans to Mars, but no plan. Commercial launch providers have a plan to provide rockets which could do that without taxpayer’s dollars. Do we just need to get the two together?

The Next Voyage of Columbia
Dwayne Day brings us up to date with restoration work on the Apollo 11 Command Module and gives a foretaste of a celebratory tour to come.

“Scooter” on stage
Rick Mulheirn was with astronaut Scott Altman on his recent visit to the UK and with with him and his wife to re-flect on a glittering career.

http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2017/spaceflight-vol-59-no-06-june-2017/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #178 on: 06/10/2017 04:54 PM »
Spaceflight Vol 59 No 07 – July 2017

NASA’s Roadmap to Mars: Stepping stones or stumbling blocks
After many years of deliberation and hardware development to acquire a deep space capability leading to putting humans on Mars, NASA has a map for how it will get humans to the Red Planet by the mid-2030s.

Space Launch System Evolves
Now little more than two years away from its first flight, we look at the current state of development with what will become the world’s most powerful launch vehicle and assess how progress is being made against some chal-lenging obstacles.

Hubble Space Telescope and the Shuttle: Advanced Satellite Servicing
Christopher Gainor FBIS takes time out from his work as one of a team under contract to NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center for an official history of the HST to tell us about the challenges of servicing the giant telescope.

http://www.bis-space.com/eshop/products-page-2/magazines/spaceflight/spaceflight-2017/spaceflight-vol-59-no-07-july-2017/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Spaceflight Magazine
« Reply #179 on: 06/10/2017 04:55 PM »
Cover

The cover photo was taken by me (Jacques van Oene)  8)

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