Author Topic: Masten Space Systems Update  (Read 260927 times)

Offline savuporo

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Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #802 on: 03/23/2017 09:18 PM »
HTP-IPA?
Really nice clean burning. Good work Masten
« Last Edit: 03/23/2017 09:19 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline catdlr

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #803 on: 03/23/2017 10:01 PM »
NASA COBALT & Masten Xodiac

SciNews

Published on Mar 23, 2017
The CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technologies (COBALT) payload was tested aboard Masten Xodiac, a rocket-powered vertical takeoff, vertical landing (VTVL) platform. John M. Carson III (COBALT Project Manager) and Carl Seubert (COBALT Payload & Flight Test Lead at JPL) explain the objectives of the test.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDYQw0B4X-s?t=001



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Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #804 on: 03/24/2017 04:35 AM »
HTP-IPA?
Really nice clean burning. Good work Masten

Looks too yellow for HTP, which has a very clear exhaust. See the exhaust for Black Arrow which used HTP and kerosene. It could be one of those salt propellants the USAF has been investigating.

http://home.earthlink.net/~apendragn/orbital_aspirations/art_111120/blackarrow.jpg
« Last Edit: 03/24/2017 04:36 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Gliderflyer

Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #805 on: 03/24/2017 11:12 PM »
Looks too yellow for HTP, which has a very clear exhaust.
I wouldn't discount HTP just yet. Engine style/operating conditions can have a large affect on plume appearance. Continuing the Black Arrow example, Blue Origin's BE-2 engine also used peroxide and kerosene, but it had a bright orange plume. That being said, I don't have the slightest idea what their propellant combination is. I wish them the best of luck; the world needs more non-toxic storable propellants.
I tried it at home

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #806 on: 04/10/2017 04:34 PM »
Local news article with video on Masten's recent NASA technology development project win:

http://www.twcnews.com/ca/antelope-valley/news/2017/04/7/masten-space-systems-wins-nasa-contract.html

Quote
“This is the first prototype version of what we call the Broadsword 25 and it’s a 25,000 pound thrust engine,” described Jake Teufert, a lead propulsion research engineer for Masten Space Systems

Offline Katana

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #807 on: 04/10/2017 04:57 PM »
HTP-IPA?
Really nice clean burning. Good work Masten

Looks too yellow for HTP, which has a very clear exhaust. See the exhaust for Black Arrow which used HTP and kerosene. It could be one of those salt propellants the USAF has been investigating.

http://home.earthlink.net/~apendragn/orbital_aspirations/art_111120/blackarrow.jpg
Black Arrow used 8:1 mix ratio with tiny kerosene fraction.The flame could be much yellower if more kerosene is added.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #808 on: 04/11/2017 07:23 AM »
Black Arrow used 8:1 mix ratio with tiny kerosene fraction.The flame could be much yellower if more kerosene is added.

That's with 85% HTP. If that is what they are using, they should have a similar mixture ratio and thus similar colour exhaust. An ablative nozzle would definitely colour the exhaust. Using 98% HTP the ratio only goes down to about 7.3:1. Still should be fairly clear.
« Last Edit: 05/12/2017 06:03 PM by gongora »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #809 on: 04/12/2017 06:23 PM »
NASA COBALT & Masten Xodiac

SciNews

Published on Mar 23, 2017
The CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technologies (COBALT) payload was tested aboard Masten Xodiac, a rocket-powered vertical takeoff, vertical landing (VTVL) platform. John M. Carson III (COBALT Project Manager) and Carl Seubert (COBALT Payload & Flight Test Lead at JPL) explain the objectives of the test.

Nice close-up photo from: https://twitter.com/jmcarson3/status/852206807883800576

Offline catdlr

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #810 on: 04/14/2017 11:26 PM »
NASA Precision Landing Technologies Completes Initial Flight Tests on Vertical Testbed Rocket

NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center

Published on Apr 14, 2017
Over the past five weeks, NASA and Masten teams have prepared for and conducted sub-orbital rocket flight tests of next-generation lander navigation technology through the CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technologies (COBALT) project.

The COBALT payload was integrated onto Masten’s rocket, Xodiac. The Xodiac vehicle used the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation during this first campaign, which was intentional to verify and refine COBALT system performance. The joint teams conducted numerous ground verification tests, made modifications in the process, practiced and refined operations’ procedures, conducted three tether tests, and have now flown two successful free flights. This successful, collaborative campaign has provided the COBALT and Xodiac teams with the valuable performance data needed to refine the systems and prepare them for the second flight test campaign this summer when the COBALT system will navigate the Xodiac rocket to a precision landing.

The technologies within COBALT provide a spacecraft with knowledge during entry, descent, and landing that enables it to precisely navigate and softly land close to surface locations that have been previously too risky to target with current capabilities. The technologies will enable future exploration destinations on Mars, the moon, Europa, and other planets and moons.

The two primary navigation components within COBALT include the Langley Research Center’s Navigation Doppler Lidar, which provides ultra-precise velocity and line-of-sight range measurements, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Lander Vision System, which provides navigation estimates relative to an existing surface map.

The integrated system is being flight tested onboard a Masten Space Systems suborbital rocket vehicle called Xodiac. The COBALT project is led by the Johnson Space Center, with funding provided through the Game Changing Development, Flight Opportunities program, and Advanced Exploration Systems programs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyoB1E8wpMA?t=001

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Offline ArbitraryConstant

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #811 on: 04/24/2017 05:39 PM »
7- They're developing they're own 60klbf LOX/Methane Dual-Expander engine ("Broadsword") for their Xephyr vehicle. Starting injector testing on a 25klbf subscale version. https://twitter.com/spacecom/status/718223677704310785  They list Exquadrum as a partner on the turbomachinery development at the previous twitter link.
Anyone know whether the dual expander cycle is open or closed?

If I had to guess I'd say open. This seems like a simpler engineering problem with limited funding and schedule, and in any case better suited for first stage use due to higher chamber, greater thrust, and higher T/W. The only other expander engine I'm aware of being proposed for use as a first stage, LE-9, is also an open cycle.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #812 on: 04/24/2017 06:43 PM »
New Masten blog entry on what they're doing and why with Xaero-B and Xodiac:

http://masten.aero/blog/what-is-the-point/

Offline jongoff

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #813 on: 04/24/2017 07:06 PM »
7- They're developing they're own 60klbf LOX/Methane Dual-Expander engine ("Broadsword") for their Xephyr vehicle. Starting injector testing on a 25klbf subscale version. https://twitter.com/spacecom/status/718223677704310785  They list Exquadrum as a partner on the turbomachinery development at the previous twitter link.
Anyone know whether the dual expander cycle is open or closed?

If I had to guess I'd say open. This seems like a simpler engineering problem with limited funding and schedule, and in any case better suited for first stage use due to higher chamber, greater thrust, and higher T/W. The only other expander engine I'm aware of being proposed for use as a first stage, LE-9, is also an open cycle.

I'm pretty sure they were talking closed cycle though, not an open cycle expander. But I'm not involved, so I could be wrong.

~Jon

Offline baldusi

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #814 on: 04/24/2017 07:50 PM »
Please remember that it could be open on one side and closed on the other. Which should be open in general but it's an important distinction. They could be using a heat exchanger, for example, and then dumping just one gas.
I would be that it is a closed cycle dual expander, but that's because why do all the complexity of a dual expander to then go with a low performance implementation like open cycle.

Offline ArbitraryConstant

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #815 on: 04/24/2017 08:23 PM »
I'm pretty sure they were talking closed cycle though, not an open cycle expander. But I'm not involved, so I could be wrong.
Cheers!

Please remember that it could be open on one side and closed on the other. Which should be open in general but it's an important distinction. They could be using a heat exchanger, for example, and then dumping just one gas.
I would be that it is a closed cycle dual expander, but that's because why do all the complexity of a dual expander to then go with a low performance implementation like open cycle.
Agreed all those things are a possibility, but isn't dual expander simpler in some ways? For example there's no need to prevent the oxygen side from coming in contact with the fuel. I'm also not sure the performance impact is as bad as it would be for a dedicated upper stage engine, since a higher combustion chamber pressure should be attainable with a greater pressure drop for the turbines, meaning better thrust, T/W, and ISP for sea level and much of the ascent. The LE-9 engine with an open cycle has a much higher chamber pressure than any closed expander cycle engine I've heard of.

I guess I'm also comparing it somewhat to Merlin, where it compromises on an open cycle and takes a bit of a performance hit there, but ends up cheaper and faster to develop with excellent performance characteristics for the intended application.

That said, my understanding is that methane being denser also helps, so I may well be out to lunch. :)

Offline catdlr

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #816 on: 04/24/2017 08:34 PM »
Xodiac Tuft Testing

mastenspace

Published on Apr 24, 2017
Tuft Testing- A visualization of the local flow field.

Tufts, which are short pieces of string, are temporarily affixed in a grid like pattern around the area(s) of interest.

By adding body panels of specific shape and size we can tailor the aerodynamic characteristics of our Xodiac rocket. Using the tuft video and vehicle data we can then determine during post flight analysis how effective everything was and repeat the testing with any needed changes until we achieve the pointing targets.

The goal for us in doing this is to use aerodynamics to passively roll the vehicle to a desired angle, in the direction of flight, for a specific payload need ie. ground surveying optics or lasers. This is a low cost and technically efficient solution for when we have to repeatably fly the vehicle in a very specific orientation with respect to the ground.

Ultimately this can reduce our RCS requirements for a given trajectory allowing the RCS system to be sized for fine pointing control or in flight trimming.

The panels have a minimum velocity at which they start to be effective and below that point the vehicle behaves as if the panels were not in place.

Masten Space Systems

www.masten.aero

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgEg23iGJIU?t=001

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Offline strangequark

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #817 on: 04/24/2017 08:36 PM »
Please remember that it could be open on one side and closed on the other. Which should be open in general but it's an important distinction. They could be using a heat exchanger, for example, and then dumping just one gas.
I would be that it is a closed cycle dual expander, but that's because why do all the complexity of a dual expander to then go with a low performance implementation like open cycle.

It's closed on both sides, but it's split on the oxygen.

Also, open cycles aren't necessarily lower performance. True, you're dumping some propellant overboard, but for hydrogen they can typically get to fairly high chamber pressures. Hydrogen's a good coolant, so the bleed flow can still cool the chamber and pull out a lot of energy,  and you can get similar power output from the turbine. However you save on the fuel pump power draw, because most of the hydrogen is only pumped up to injector pressure, rather than turbine inlet pressure. That's a net gain on the power cycle. Higher chamber pressures then mean that you can do a higher expansion ratio for the same exit pressure (important for boost engines), or for the same engine length (important for vacuum engines). The net results may be an Isp gain, in spite of the less efficient expansion of the bleed flow.
« Last Edit: 04/24/2017 09:06 PM by strangequark »
Don't flippantly discount the old rules of this industry. Behind each one lies a painful lesson learned from broken, twisted hardware. Learn those lessons, and respect the knowledge gained from them. Only then, see if you can write new rules that will meet those challenges.

Offline ArbitraryConstant

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #818 on: 04/24/2017 09:35 PM »
It's closed on both sides, but it's split on the oxygen.
Thanks for the awesome post!

Offline baldusi

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Re: Masten Space Systems Update
« Reply #819 on: 04/25/2017 06:02 PM »
It's closed on both sides, but it's split on the oxygen.

Forgive my ignorance, but split on the oxygen side means that the oxygen is heated by a heat exchanger and only LH2 is used as coolant?

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