Author Topic: Protecting SLS from Fire and Ice - TPS foam application proceeding at Michoud  (Read 8598 times)

Offline rayleighscatter

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Very very basic question, common sense wise, why get away from the Saturn V design for a rocket going to the moon ?, the blueprints for man's greatest machine surely still exist. The shuttle design booster seems to troublesome, from foam to O rings etc. I suppose I will answer my own question, tooling perhaps ?

Saturn V had a lot of issues and to iron them all out would require an update, essentially, of every piece. And we have a case study on that with J2-X.

Offline penguin44

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Also, weren't the blueprints for it lost in the 70s?

Offline ncb1397

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Very very basic question, common sense wise, why get away from the Saturn V design for a rocket going to the moon ?, the blueprints for man's greatest machine surely still exist. The shuttle design booster seems to troublesome, from foam to O rings etc. I suppose I will answer my own question, tooling perhaps ?

Saturn V had a lot of issues and to iron them all out would require an update, essentially, of every piece. And we have a case study on that with J2-X.

J-2x had so many changes in part because of the different architecture. For instance,throttling requirements were set so as not to impart too much force on the docking adapter between Orion and Altair in the "1.5 launch" Constellation architecture. If all you wanted to do was build another Saturn V, you wouldn't need to make such changes. You wouldn't need higher isp, nozzle extensions or anything like that.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Also, weren't the blueprints for it lost in the 70s?

No. NASA still has them. You can buy some of them here:

http://www.aerospaceprojectsreview.com/catalog/drawndoc.htm

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline MaxTeranous

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It's a many order problem. NASA may have the blueprints, but not the tooling, processes, and skills. To make the tooling may in turn need other tooling that don't exist. That may have been made by a subcontractor that doesn't exist, so any documentation is gone. Using skills that are no longer used in modern manufacturing, so largely don't exist. And you have to do that for all ~3 million parts....

Offline the_other_Doug

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AIUI, tooling for large projects is usually stored for a certain period of time, and then scrapped when the decision is made that the product will never again be produced.

It's mainly a matter of paying for properly environmentally-controlled storage space.  There is nothing to stop NASA or a contractor from storing the tooling for a major rocket or spacecraft system indefinitely, except for the expense.

As for blueprints, same thing applies.  And storage for the blueprints is rather less of an expense.  I don't imagine any of the blueprints from the Apollo era and on, for launch vehicles or spacecraft, have been lost.  They are useful for historical reasons, if nothing else.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

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