Author Topic: ULA Vulcan Launch Vehicle (as announced/built) - General Discussion Thread 3  (Read 18443 times)

Offline meekGee

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The EELV is simply less interesting to most observers, and so 6 months here or there generate a lot less excitement.

There's no such thing as a less interesting EELV. Customers are interested in whatever launch vehicle best fits their need for a specific launch. They don't care how many engines it has, what color it's painted, who makes the vehicle or if it has 2 or 5 stages. They are only interested in an appropriate launch service and whatever EELV fits their needs becomes the choice.
This exchange started when someone asked why delays in the Vulcan program generate less reaction from observers, compared with slips in other nextGen schedules.

I was simply comparing what those nextGen programs were, and showing a correlation.
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Online AncientU

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The EELV is simply less interesting to most observers, and so 6 months here or there generate a lot less excitement.

They fly more interesting missions than GTO comsats or station resupply.   

Too many people are caught up in the means with the ends are more important.  I don't care how I get my packages.

When there are no winning arguments about the launch vehicle, the goal posts move to 'more interesting missions.'
Vulcan's competition will win on that field, too.
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
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Offline Jim

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When there are no winning arguments about the launch vehicle, the goal posts move to 'more interesting missions.'

It was never about the launch vehicles, it was always about the missions.  It has been the fan boys that have made about the launch vehicles, first it was shuttle, then it was Direct and now it is Falcon 9.

NROL, Juno, MSL, STSS Demo, X-37, MRO, SBIRS, etc are all more interesting than F9 comsat launch. 

There are parallels with train foamers and Spacex fans.
« Last Edit: 01/13/2018 08:38 PM by Jim »

Online Chris Bergin

For Jim's next birthday I'm going to give him moderator powers for 24 hours. Then you're all running for the hills! ;D

Let's keep this on Vulcan. Some of you may realize it, but we actually cover SpaceX a bit here and have a few threads somewhere on the forum.

;D

--

One member didn't listen. That member has lost his post.

Offline Chasm

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The power pack oops and consequent silence made it quite clear that Vulcan would be affected too. So the 6 month announcement was already old news and not too interesting to observers. Centaur V however was entirely new and good reasoning.

I think the reasoning why ULA decided to eat a 6 month delay twofold.
ULA needed the Centaur V for the EELV bid. Going into the bid with a "to be developed in the future" capability for some reference orbits would be a disadvantage.
The RD-180 engine replacement obviously got delayed. The engineers might as well work on something else instead of just waiting on the next BE-4 (or even AR-1) milestone.

Offline john smith 19

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I think the reasoning why ULA decided to eat a 6 month delay twofold.
ULA needed the Centaur V for the EELV bid. Going into the bid with a "to be developed in the future" capability for some reference orbits would be a disadvantage.
I think this is the big event.  It telescopes 2 US development cycles (which was inevitable if they wanted to cover the full range of DoD orbits and payloads) into one.
Quote from: Chasm
The RD-180 engine replacement obviously got delayed. The engineers might as well work on something else instead of just waiting on the next BE-4 (or even AR-1) milestone.
Depends on the delay. My impression is AR-1 is so far behind the only way AJR has a shot is if they promise to deliver an engine that can do a full duration burn (equal to a booster stage flight to MECO) by the end of the delay (likewise for Blue).

Schedule for Vulcan deployment is everything. The faster they transition the fewer mfg lines they have to run and the faster they lower their costs.
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Online envy887

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Too many people are caught up in the means with the ends are more important.  I don't care how I get my packages.

You have multiple competitors offering trivially cheap prices to deliver your packages. When orbital delivery has the same, the means will attract far less attention. But Vulcan ... isn't really a step in that direction. ACES is, but it's constantly 10 years away.

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