Author Topic: Expedition 54 Thread  (Read 12815 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #60 on: 01/09/2018 08:15 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/5/2018

Amyloid: Today the crew retrieved the final set of Amyloid samples from the measurement experiment unit on the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) where they will remain until they are returned on SpaceX-13. Amyloid fibrils prepared in the microgravity environment of the ISS are returned to Earth for analysis through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Amyloid fibrils are the peptide or protein aggregates known to be associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.  It is expected that this study will provide additional insight into the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  A 52S crewmember collected surface and air samples to characterize the different types of microbial locations on the ISS. The samples were placed inside a MELFI in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1 year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Circadian Rhythms: The 53S subject removed and stowed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Unit equipment that was used to complete a 36-hour Circadian Rhythms session that began on Wednesday. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crewmembers’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crewmembers.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): A 52S subject conducted his Flight Day (FD) 120 blood sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in MELFI.
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

At Home in Space:  A 53S crewmember completed an At Home in Space questionnaire this morning. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Igniter Tip Alignment for Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) Operations: To properly align the ACME igniter tip with the ACME coflow burner, the crew removed the chamber insert from the CIR combustion chamber and restrained it to the maintenance work area, before aligning the igniter tip to the coflow burner. The crew then reinstalled and connected the chamber insert into the CIR combustion chamber.  The ACME investigation is a set of five independent studies of gaseous flames to be conducted in the CIR. ACME’s primary goal is to improved fuel efficiency and reduced pollutant production in practical combustion on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Transparent Alloys Cartridge Installation: After the installation of the cartridge into the Transparent Alloys hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), there was poor contact between the Transparent Alloys hardware and the cold plate in the MSG that resulted in the inability to properly control the heating of the cartridge. Ground teams are working a plan to resolve this configuration issue.  The experiment run for this investigation will be deferred until after the configuration is corrected next week and then will run for a month. The aim of this experiment is to study the morphological instabilities of directional solidified, transparent binary eutectic alloys under purely diffusive conditions. It is planned to observe real-time the dynamics of eutectic front structures with a micron-scale resolution, over a large (centimetric) space scale, and over long periods of time. Such observations would be strongly sensitive to convective motions in the liquid, which, in ordinary conditions on earth, entail a detrimental redistribution of the solute on a scale comparable to the container size. Such convective motions are suppressed in microgravity. The specific goals of the experiment is: to study the formation and the relaxation of topological defects in rod-like structures, to study the rod-to-lamellar transition of eutectic growth patterns, to study the forcing effects of the distortions of the thermal gradient.

Space Headaches:  The crew completed the weekly questionnaire for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

ZBook Transitions:  Today the crew finished the transition of laptops in the Russian segment from the T61P model to the newer ZBook model.

Cargo operations:  Today, the crew continued working to pack cargo into the SpX-13 Dragon capsule for return to Earth.  Hatch closure is planned for January 12th.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #61 on: 01/10/2018 07:30 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/8/2018
 

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Over the weekend, a 52S subject completed his Flight Day (FD) 120 urine sample collections to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).
•The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  Today the crew photographed the APEX-05 petri plates growing in the Veggie facility. Before installing the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) for imaging, the crew checked that the inside of the petri plates were free of condensation and the outside of the plate was dry. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Transparent Alloys Operation: During the installation of the cartridge last week, there was poor contact between the Transparent Alloys hardware and the cold plate in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), which resulted in the inability to properly control the heating of the cartridge. Results from the analysis of the MSG configuration determined that the MSG cold plate still had some M6 plugs installed that prevented good contact and heat transfer between the Transparent Alloys payload and the MSG cold plate. Today the crew removed the plugs, and after activation, the temperature readings are now in the nominal and expected range. This experiment run has started, and will last for a month. The aim of this experiment is to study the morphological instabilities of directional solidified, transparent binary eutectic alloys under purely diffusive conditions. It is planned to observe real-time the dynamics of eutectic front structures with a micron-scale resolution, over a large (centimetric) space scale, and over long periods of time. Such observations would be strongly sensitive to convective motions in the liquid, which, in ordinary conditions on earth, entail a detrimental redistribution of the solute on a scale comparable to the container size. Such convective motions are suppressed in microgravity. The specific goals of the experiment are: to study the formation and the relaxation of topological defects in rod-like structures, to study the rod-to-lamellar transition of eutectic growth patterns, to study the forcing effects of the distortions of the thermal gradient.

Airway Monitoring Overview and Hardware Gather: The crew reviewed reference material and gathered hardware to support the upcoming Airway Monitoring session this week.  With dust particles present in the International Space Station atmosphere, Airway Monitoring studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight any health impacts and to maintain crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars for example, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions.   

Dragon Operations: The crew continued with Dragon cargo loading operations.  They installed a Lithium Hydroxide (LiOH) filter into the Dragon vehicle to scrub CO2 after hatch closure and completed a checkout of the Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Communication Unit (CUCU) Crew Command Panel (CCP) in preparation for Dragon release operations.  Dragon hatch closure and unberth is scheduled for January 12 with release scheduled on January 13.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew set up a Station Support Computer (SSC) and relocated items out of the airlock.  They completed 1 of 2 training sessions on using the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) and Enhanced Caution and Warning System (ECWS).  The crew also performed a checkout of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU 3004) that was delivered on Dragon SpaceX-13.  The two planned EVA crewmembers also took EMU sizing measurements for the On-Orbit Fitcheck.

Offline Zakrah

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #62 on: 01/11/2018 01:10 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/8/2018
 
...
Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  Today the crew photographed the APEX-05 petri plates growing in the Veggie facility. Before installing the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) for imaging, the crew checked that the inside of the petri plates were free of condensation and the outside of the plate was dry. When plants are grown in the confines of the International Space Station (ISS), they do not seem to get enough air and as a result, exhibit a stress response in their genes and proteins. The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.
...

Expedition 54 astronaut Scott Tingle working at the Light Microscopy Module getting ready to remove our APEX-05 petri plate on Tuesday.


Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #63 on: 01/11/2018 03:00 PM »
"Spheres Zero Robotics" right now, by Joe Acaba and Alexander Misurkin, Kibo lab...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #64 on: 01/12/2018 06:23 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/10/2018
 

Airway Monitoring Measurement Operations: Using the Portable Pulmonary Function System (PPFS) for guidance, today two crewmembers performed two different measurement protocols; the low Nitric Oxide (NO) protocol which determines how much NO is exhaled with the respiration, and the high NO protocol, which determines how much NO is diffused into the blood. The protocols were initially performed in the Airlock at an ambient pressure and then repeated at a low pressure (10.2 psi). At the low pressure, oxygen concentration in the Airlock is increased to 27.5%. The primary goal of the Airway Monitoring experiment is to determine how gravity and microgravity influences the turnover of Nitric Oxide in the lungs. During future manned missions to the Moon and to Mars, airway inflammation due to toxic dust inhalation is a risk factor. Since dust may cause airway inflammation and since such inflammation can be monitored by exhaled Nitric Oxide analysis, the present study is highly relevant for astronaut health in future space programs. The US Airlock, for this experiment is used as a hypobaric facility for performing science. Utilizing the US Airlock will allow unique opportunities for the study of gravity, ambient pressure interactions, and their effect on the human body.

Arthrospira-B (Batch Culture) Assembly: The crew removed four Arthrospira experiment containers from the Biolab Incubator to exchange the reservoirs inside the Biolab. Following the exchange of the reservoirs, the ECs were reinstalled back onto Biolab Incubator. The Arthrospira B experiment is an important step in making improvements in the area of closed regenerative life support systems in space which will help in making future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit become a reality.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections (Biochemical Profile, Repository): Today a 53S subject concluded his Flight Day (FD) 30 urine sample collection that began yesterday to support the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. The samples were placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).

Spaceflight-induced Hypoxic/ROS Signaling (APEX-05) Operations:  The crew inserted two APEX-05 RNAlater Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fixation Tubes (KFT)s into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) prior to return on SpaceX-13 (SpX-13). The APEX-05 experiment grows different wild and mutant varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to understand how their genetic and molecular stress response systems work in space. The plants grow from seeds in the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the ISS, are frozen, and returned to Earth for detailed laboratory analysis.

Rodent Research 6 (RR-6) Transporter Setup: To prepare for the return of two of the four animal transporters on SpaceX-13, the crew reviewed reference material and participated in a conference about live animal return operations. The crew also set up and conducted checkout activities on the live animal transporter. The Rodent Research-6 (RR-6) mission uses mice flown aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and maintained on Earth to test drug delivery systems for combatting muscular breakdown in space or during disuse conditions. RR-6 includes several groups of mice selectively treated with a placebo or implanted with a nanochannel drug delivery chip that administers compounds meant to maintain muscle in low gravity/disuse conditions.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) Operations:  Ground teams maneuvered the Japanese Experiment Module) Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) to transfer NREP from the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) slide table to the Exposed Facility Unit (EFU)-4. After transfer operations were complete, the JEMRMS was maneuvered back to a stowed position and NREP was activated via ground command.  NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

Dragon Release On Board Training (OBT):  This morning, the crew performed onboard training for this weekend’s upcoming release of the SpaceX-13 Dragon capsule.  The training included the use of the Robotics On-Board Trainer (ROBoT) and a private conference with ground-based trainers.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #65 on: 01/12/2018 02:27 PM »
January 12, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-010

Idaho Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on International Space Station

Students from 10 schools in Idaho will speak with a NASA astronaut living and working aboard the International Space Station at 11:25 a.m. EST Tuesday, Jan. 17. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Approximately 400 students will travel to Boise State University for the call to Expedition 54 astronaut Joe Acaba, who arrived at the orbiting laboratory Sept. 12. They will have an opportunity to ask him questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans, and doing science in space.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Brady Moore at bradywmoore@boisestate.edu or 208-426-1586. The location of the event is 1910 University Dr.

Boise State University was selected through a competitive process to host a downlink with the space station. Students in the participating districts have been preparing for the event by studying the space station, astronaut biographies, and current research and activities aboard the space station.

Linking students directly to astronauts in space provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

 https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #66 on: 01/12/2018 04:00 PM »
ISS Expedition 54 In-Flight Educational Event with the Puerto Rico Institute of Robotics in San Juan, Puerto Rico and Flight Engineer Joe Acaba.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 54 Thread
« Reply #67 on: 01/13/2018 09:43 AM »
ISS configuration updated after Dragon CRS-13 departure at 09.58 UTC

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