Author Topic: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates  (Read 241382 times)

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #540 on: 10/18/2017 09:40 PM »
Yeah, AAS, for example, apparently never got the memo...

https://aas.org/posts/blog/2017/10/jwst-launch-delayed-will-remain-within-cost-cap
That AAS post links to a NASA paper that charts the possible launch windows through next year.  At a high level, there is roughly a one-week cutout each month, with longer cutouts around each solstice and equinox.

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160001318.pdf

Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #541 on: 10/19/2017 01:10 AM »
What Lurks Beneath NASA's Chamber A

NASA Goddard
Published on Oct 18, 2017


Hidden below Chamber A at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston is an area engineers used to test critical contamination control technology that has helped keep NASA's James Webb Space Telescope clean during cryogenic testing.

This voluminous area is called the plenum, and it supports the weight of the chamber above as well as houses some of the cabling and plumbing for it. Before Webb's cryogenic testing in the chamber commenced, engineers ventured to the plenum's depths to test NASA-developed technology designed to remove molecular contaminants from the air.

Catching contaminants

Nithin Abraham, a coatings engineer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is part of a contamination control team tasked with ensuring Webb remains as clean as possible during its testing in Chamber A. Abraham developed and tested a highly permeable and porous material called molecular adsorber coating (MAC), which can be sprayed onto surfaces to passively capture contaminants that could be harmful to Webb's optics and science instruments.

Read more: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/...

For more information about NASA's Webb telescope, visit: www.webb.nasa.gov or www.nasa.gov/webb

Read more about how we are keeping Chamber A free of contaminants:
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/...

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Mike McClare

Music Credits:

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12746

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eOcMRhLvW8?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline bolun

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #542 on: 10/19/2017 07:48 PM »
#13: TESTING THE COOLEST INSTRUMENT ON THE JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE

http://sci.esa.int/jwst/59658-13-testing-the-coolest-instrument-on-jwst/

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #543 on: 10/24/2017 09:21 PM »
Quote
Listening to Natl Acad Cmte on Astronomy and Astrophysics (CAA) mtg in CA. JWST Prog Dir Eric Smith is bfg them on 6 month launch delay.
https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/922922675818786816

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CAA mbr Tom Young says s'prising that a 6-mo delay would occur so late in the program. Just 1 yr before launch. Did mgmt drop the ball?
https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/922923146881089536

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Smith: only recently realized that integration schedule was "pretty optimistic." "Should we have caught it earlier, yes."
https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/922923409738051584

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Young: Goddard should have had oversight of this. Smith: "I agree completely. Should have been more conservative from the start on skdl."
https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/922923875746189312

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Young: how much more of a slip can your reserves fund? Smith: don't want to say how much I have. Key is how quickly NGAS workforce rolls off
https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/922926374452584448

Offline as58

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #544 on: 10/24/2017 09:31 PM »
Slides from last week's APAC meeting are available with updates about JWST and other missions.

https://science.nasa.gov/researchers/nac/science-advisory-committees/apac

Offline savuporo

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #545 on: 10/24/2017 09:49 PM »
This thread has missed an important milestone, by the way. Original JWST ( then still NGST ) contract was awarded on Sept 16th, 2002. 15 years officially in development now.
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #546 on: 10/26/2017 09:58 PM »
Quote
Sunshield Deployment and Layers Fully Tensioned on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope

REDONDO BEACH, Calif. – Oct. 26, 2017 – Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC), which designed NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) optics, spacecraft bus, and sunshield for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has deployed the sunshield subsystem and fully tensioned the five sunshield layers for the first time.

“The first tensioning of the sunshield is a monumental and exciting moment, not only for the program but for the collaborative JWST team,” said Scott Willoughby, vice president and program manager, James Webb Space Telescope, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems “The innovative sunshield is an industry first, and will protect Webb’s optics from heat, making it possible to gather images of the formation of the first stars and galaxies more than 13.5 billion years ago.”

In space, the sunshield subsystem divides the JWST observatory into a warm sun-facing side and a cold space-facing side comprised of the optics and scientific instruments. The sunshield subsystem, which includes the structure and mechanisms required for deploying the five-layer subsystem, was designed, manufactured and assembled by Northrop Grumman, with the five membrane layers manufactured by the NeXolve Corporation in Huntsville, Alabama.

The flight membranes will be folded, stowed and tensioned again two additional times for testing. The folding and stowing method is how the membranes will be folded and stowed for launch. The sunshield layers, known for being the size of a tennis court, will protect and prevent the background heat from the Sun, Earth and Moon from interfering with JWST’s infrared sensors.

The sunshield layers, each as thin as a human hair, work together to reduce the temperatures between the hot and cold sides of the observatory by approximately 570 degrees Fahrenheit. Moving from the sun-facing layer to the one closest to the telescope, each successive layer of the sunshield, which is made of Kapton, is cooler than the one below. The sunshield, along with the rest of the spacecraft, will fold origami-style into an Ariane 5 rocket.

The James Webb Space Telescope, the scientific complement to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, will be the premier space observatory of the next decade. Webb is an international project led by NASA with its partners, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency.

https://news.northropgrumman.com/news/releases/sunshield-deployment-and-layers-fully-tensioned-on-nasas-james-webb-space-telescope

Photo caption:

Quote
At Northrop Grumman highbay facilities in Redondo Beach, California, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s five sunshield layers are fully tensioned for the first time.

Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #547 on: 10/27/2017 05:54 AM »
James Webb Space Telescope Laser-Focused Sight

NASA Goddard
Published on Oct 26, 2017

About 1 million miles away from the nearest eye surgeon, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perfect its own vision while in orbit.

Though the Webb telescope will focus on stars and galaxies approximately 13.5 billion light-years away, its sight goes through a similar process as you would if you underwent laser vision correction surgery to be able to focus on an object 10 feet across the room. In orbit at Earth’s second Lagrange point (L2), far from the help of a terrestrial doctor, Webb will use its near-infrared camera (NIRCam) instrument to help align its primary mirror segments about 40 days after launch, once they have unfolded from their unaligned stowed position and cooled to their operating temperatures.

Laser vision correction surgery reshapes the cornea of the eye to remove imperfections that cause vision problems like nearsightedness. The cornea is the surface of the eye; it helps focus rays of light on the retina at the back of the eye, and though it appears to be uniform and smooth, it can be misshapen and pockmarked with dents, dimples, and other imperfections that can affect a person’s sight. The relative positioning of Webb’s primary mirror segments after launch will be the equivalent of these corneal imperfections, and engineers on Earth will need to make corrections to the mirrors’ positions to bring them into alignment, ensuring they will produce sharp, focused images.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbVzOtCfh9U?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline bolun

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #549 on: 12/01/2017 08:54 PM »
Quote
Dec. 1, 2017

NASA’s Webb Telescope Emerges from Chamber A
NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, or Webb, emerged from Chamber A at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston on Dec. 1 to prepare for its upcoming move to California.

The telescope’s combined science instruments and optical element recently completed about 100 days of cryogenic testing inside Johnson’s Chamber A, a massive thermal vacuum testing chamber at the center. Scientists and engineers at Johnson put Webb through a series of tests designed to ensure the telescope functioned as expected in an extremely cold, airless environment akin to that of space.

This move outside the chamber brings Webb one step closer to its journey to Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California, where it will be integrated with its spacecraft element to form the complete James Webb Space Telescope observatory. The spacecraft element is Webb’s combined sunshield and spacecraft bus.

The James Webb Space Telescope is the world’s premier infrared space observatory of the next decade. A barrier-breaking mission for engineers and astronomers, Webb will solve mysteries of our solar system, look beyond to distant worlds around other stars, and probe the mysterious structures and origins of our universe and our place in it. Webb is an international program led by NASA with its partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA).

Take a look at the Webbcam to see Webb’s current location in the Chamber A cleanroom!

For more information about the Webb telescope visit: www.webb.nasa.gov or www.nasa.gov/webb

By Eric Villard
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/nasa-s-webb-telescope-emerges-from-chamber-a

Photo 1 caption:

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NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope emerged from Chamber A at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston on Dec. 1, 2017, to prepare for its upcoming move to California.
Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

Photo 2 caption:

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Engineers pose by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope shortly after it emerged from Chamber A at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston on Dec. 1, 2017.
Credits: NASA/Chris Gunn

Offline eeergo

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #550 on: 12/06/2017 10:48 AM »
If you wanna get agitated by seeing hyper-expensive hardware getting shaken in a confined space:

https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/938130637436923906

Cheers ;)
-DaviD-

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #551 on: 12/06/2017 03:06 PM »
If you wanna get agitated by seeing hyper-expensive hardware getting shaken in a confined space:

https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/938130637436923906

Cheers ;)

Thank's for posting that. I have long wondered what the actual vibration test looked like.

You look at that big gold mirror and think "that's a precision optical system" and shudder...

A couple of weeks ago my interns were out at Goddard and heard something being tested in their big acoustic chamber there. I think it may have been Parker Solar Probe. The area they were in was roped off because of the test, so the chamber was a hundred feet away or so, and they were separated by a viewing glass that overlooked the hallway that led to the chamber, but they said the noise was still pretty loud.


Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #552 on: 12/13/2017 03:10 AM »
How Do You Safely Transport a Space Telescope?

James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
Published on Dec 12, 2017

Throughout the construction and assembly of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, the telescope has moved between NASA centers and partner locations. When Webb moves, it is carefully packed inside a specially designed container called the Space Telescope Transporter for Air, Road, and Sea (STTARS). As the name implies, the container protects Webb on the ground, above ground, and over water. This massive container weighs approximately 165,000 pounds (almost 75,000 kilograms) and dwarfs Webb in terms of mass — the telescope weighs approximately 14,000 pounds (6,350 kilograms) here on Earth. All of that bulk is needed to keep Webb’s individual parts, and eventually the fully assembled telescope, safe during the journey to the launch pad.

Credits:
Michael P. Menzel (AIMM): Lead Producer
Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET Systems, Inc.): Technical Support
Eric Villard (InuTec, LLC): Writer
Eric Villard (InuTec, LLC): Producer
Michael McClare (KBRwyle): Videographer
Sophia Roberts (AIMM): Videographer
Sophia Roberts (AIMM): Video Editor
Rob Andreoli (AIMM): Videographer
Michael Randazzo (AIMM): Videographer
Michael P. Menzel (AIMM): Videographer
Michael P. Menzel (AIMM): Video Editor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lp80NhMtEc?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #553 on: 12/19/2017 09:36 PM »


Quote
Highbay Integration Progress of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
Northrop Grumman

Published on 19 Dec 2017
Watch a time lapse video of the integration progress of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in Northrop Grumman’s Redondo Beach facilities! Northrop Grumman is proud to lead the industry team building JWST. This revolutionary observatory is the largest telescope built for space and the most powerful infrared telescope ever made. It is the scientific successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The Webb telescope will travel 1 million miles from earth and look back over 13.5 billion years, providing images of the first galaxies formed and observing unexplored planets around distant stars. The breakthrough technology developed for the Webb Telescope will expand our understanding of the universe, rewrite textbooks and inspire a future generation of engineers and scientists.

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #554 on: 12/29/2017 05:03 PM »
I am increasingly doubtful JWST will launch this decade.

Is the James Webb Space Telescope "Too Big to Fail?"

Quote
To help satisfy any doubts about JWST’s status, the project is headed for an independent review as soon as January 2018, advised NASA’s science chief Thomas Zurbuchen during an early December congressional hearing. Pressed by legislators about whether JWST will actually launch as presently planned in spring of 2019, he said, “at this moment in time, with the information that I have, I believe it’s achievable.”

Quote
During the December congressional hearing on JWST and other future NASA space telescopes, Space Subcommittee chairman Brian Babin (R-Texas) questioned the decision to send JWST to space by way of the Ariane 5 rocket “instead of a reliable U.S. launch vehicle.” He also asked about the risks associated with transporting the telescope to the European launch site in South America.
When asked by Scientific American, two senior members of NASA’s JWST team provided assurances. Jon Lawrence, JWST mechanical systems lead engineer/launch vehicle liaison at NASA Goddard and Eric Smith, program director and program scientist for JWST at NASA headquarters, jointly offered a carefully optimistic take.

Quote
“The consequences are almost too horrific to imagine,” says Jack Burns, professor of astrophysics and planetary science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. “The thought of over $8 billion of taxpayer funding being lost [would] have potential dire consequences for NASA and for astrophysics. There [would] be multiple committee hearings on Capitol Hill and independent panels assembled to investigate,” he says.
Those investigations, Burns says, would follow a long and winding road of accusations and denials that would be made all the worse by the absence of JWST’s foremost congressional champion, Barbara Mikulski, a veteran Democratic senator from Maryland who recently retired from public service.

Quote
Increasingly, however, there are rumblings that JWST may not even make its planned launch in 2019. During December’s congressional hearing, Thomas Young, a former director of NASA Goddard and a member of the National Academies Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics said JWST could still experience further disruptions.

Quote
While JWST continues to make progress toward launch, Chaplain warned the program is encountering technical challenges that require both time and money to fix and may lead to additional delays. “Given the risks associated with the integration and test work ahead, coupled with a level of schedule reserves that is currently well below the level stated in the procedural requirements issued by the NASA center responsible for managing JWST, additional delays to the project’s revised launch readiness date of June 2019 are likely,” she stated in written testimony.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/is-the-james-webb-space-telescope-too-big-to-fail/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #555 on: 01/05/2018 04:24 PM »
January 05, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-003

NASA Hosts Media to Discuss Testing on James Webb Space Telescope
 
Media are invited to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday, Jan. 10, to hear about the results of recent cryogenic vacuum tests on the James Webb Space Telescope, and the next steps on the observatory path to space.

The news conference will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Participants will be:
•Ellen Ochoa, Johnson center director and veteran NASA astronaut
•Bill Ochs, Webb telescope project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland
•Jonathan Homan, project manager for Webb telescope Chamber A Test Team at Johnson
•Mark Voyton, Webb telescope Optical Telescope Element and Integrated Science Instrument Module (OTIS) manager at Goddard

U.S. media who would like to participate in person must call the Johnson newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 9. Reporters who wish to participate by telephone must call Johnson's newsroom no later than 1:45 p.m. Jan. 10. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.       

Webb was tested as a complete optical system in Chamber A at Johnson, which mimics the space environment the telescope will experience during its mission. Built in 1965 to conduct thermal-vacuum testing on the Apollo command and service modules, Chamber A is the largest structure of its kind in the world and is a listed National Historic Landmark.

The James Webb Space Telescope is the world’s premier infrared space observatory of the next decade. Webb will help to solve mysteries of our solar system, look to distant worlds orbiting other stars, and probe the mysterious structures and origins of our universe and our place in it. Webb is an international program led by NASA with its partners, the ESA (European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency.

For more information about the Webb telescope, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/webb

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #556 on: 01/10/2018 09:43 PM »

Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #557 on: 01/26/2018 06:20 AM »
James Webb Space Telescope’s Multifaceted MIRI


James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)
Published on Jan 25, 2018

The mid-infrared instrument (MIRI) of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has both a camera and a spectrograph that sees light in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, with wavelengths that are longer than our eyes see.

MIRI covers the wavelength range of 5 to 28.5 microns. Its sensitive detectors will allow it to see the redshifted light of distant galaxies, helping identify the first galaxies in the universe, observe newly forming stars by peering inside dust-shrouded stellar nurseries, and analyze the atmospheres of exoplanets for markers of potential life. MIRI's camera will provide wide-field, broadband imaging that will return breathtaking astrophotography.

MIRI was built by the MIRI Consortium (a group that consists of scientists and engineers from European countries), a team from the Jet Propulsion Lab in California, and scientists from several U.S. institutions.

Credits:
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET Systems, Inc.): Technical Support
Adriana Manrique Gutierrez (USRA): Animator
Michael McClare (KBRwyle): Producer
Sophia Roberts (AIMM): Videographer
Sophia Roberts (AIMM): Cinematographer
Rob Andreoli (AIMM): Videographer
Rob Andreoli (AIMM): Cinematographer
Michael P. Menzel (AIMM): Producer
Michael P. Menzel (AIMM): Interviewer
Michael P. Menzel (AIMM): Video Editor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYIfmAbkk4k?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Star One

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NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #558 on: 01/26/2018 06:28 AM »
I noticed in The Verge article covering the anomaly in the latest Ariane launch they made sure to remind their readers that the Ariane 5 will be eventually launching the JWST make of that what you will.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/25/16934528/arianespace-ariane-anomaly-second-stage-nasa-gold-mission-space-weather
« Last Edit: 01/26/2018 06:29 AM by Star One »

Offline woods170

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Re: NASA - James Webb Space Telescope - Discussion and Updates
« Reply #559 on: 01/26/2018 06:58 AM »
I noticed in The Verge article covering the anomaly in the latest Ariane launch they made sure to remind their readers that the Ariane 5 will be eventually launching the JWST make of that what you will.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/25/16934528/arianespace-ariane-anomaly-second-stage-nasa-gold-mission-space-weather

Just another manifestation of the "not invented here"-syndrome that has permeated into every aspect of US society, including US politics and the media.

Boring.

The only other vehicle capable of lifting JWST to its target orbit is Delta IV Heavy. Which has flown only nine (9) times, with one partial failure.
Ariane 5 ECA, on the other hand, has flown 65 times with one complete failure and one partial failure.

As such, Ariane 5 ECA is significantly more reliable right now than Delta IV Heavy ever will be.
« Last Edit: 01/26/2018 11:42 AM by woods170 »

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