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Speaker Slide Presentation: Our Purpose – A Spaceline for Earth (w/audio)

ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

Mike Moses, President, Virgin Galactic

Virgin Galactic is committed to not just building and flying a single spaceship, we are building a fleet of ships to carry people and payloads to suborbital space. This Spaceline will provide life-changing experiences for our customers and give us the momentum to evolve personal spaceflight in the future. We will look into the purpose of that Spaceline – as well as the progress of the current flight test program and our progress on building the next vehicles that will make up the heart of the Virgin Galactic Spaceline.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qv-7LyPuvGs?t=001

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The cartoon frames Chris posted and video at post 1342 http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30850.1340 (ISS R&D 17) have Bigelow's answers to why. Mainly, political, as in beat or meet the Chinese; also, mine heavy metals, harvest 3He for nuclear energy, and build a casino. Not saying he's realistic...

As for docking landers and such, seems conceivable to rendezvous a node module akin to Unity or Harmony - but why need more than one dock?

The big question I see regarding an LLO station... what's the plan for rad hazard?  Yes, I'm aware of the idea of making the water tank a shelter for CME/solar flares, but with GCR we're not gonna have 8 month missions like we do inside the Van Allen belts (https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/van-allen-probes-spot-impenetrable-barrier-in-space). Big incentive to keep crews on orbit as little as possible. Pressurize (part of?) a lunar lava tube ASAP? I'm not up to date on current thinking re: how much protection they'll actually offer.
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Commercial Space Flight General / Re: Spaceport America Thread
« Last post by catdlr on Today at 05:43 AM »
Speaker Slide Presentation: Long Term Vision for Spaceport America (w/audio)


ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

Dan Hicks, Chief Executive Officer, Spaceport America

Mr. Hicks will discuss current capabilities, customers and vision to becoming a Global Port for access to space. This vision will focus on servicing the suborbital, orbital, cis-lunar, and deep space travel environments. As with any Global Port, how do we start planning for the required infrastructure (highway, rail cargo shipping and receiving, etc.) and partnerships to enable all logistic servicing of the commercial space industry for our future space travel requirements.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GeaWhrulqjM?t=001

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Speaker Slide Presentation: Leveraging CRS to Expand LEO Commercialization (w/audio)

ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

Mark Sirangelo, Corporate Vice President, Sierra Nevada Corporation’s Space Systems

In 2012, 461kg of cargo was delivered to the ISS by one commercial vendor. In 2016, Leveraging CRS to Expand LEO Commercialization the number was 11,387kg by both Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) 1 providers, Orbital ATK and SpaceX. In 2017, they are expected to launch over 17,000kg to the ISS. With the extension of ISS to at least 2024 and award of the CRS2 contracts, Orbital ATK, SpaceX, and now Sierra Nevada will expand and solidify the LEO commercial transportation market. Simultaneously a broad spectrum of government, academic and commercial research activities aboard the ISS will be enabled. The ISPCS Commercial Cargo Panel will provide key insights into the future plans and capabilities of the CRS2 providers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfYVptsuTIY?t=001

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Speaker Slide Presentation: Commercial Crew: On Course to Purposeful Flight (w/audio)

ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

Benjamin Reed, Director of Commercial Crew Mission Management, SpaceX

Two American companies are on course, following their own unique paths to produce certified end-to-end crew transportation systems capable of flying astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Launch pads along Florida’s Space Coast have taken shape, spacecraft and launch vehicle hardware are being built and extensive qualification testing is under way for Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon systems. The companies are working diligently and purposefully with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program and the astronauts selected to train to fly flight tests to the International Space Station to ensure the systems are meeting the agency’s certification requirements and adequately addressing all credible hazards, including pad emergencies, in-flight aborts and emergency landings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hgVWRDsolk?t=001

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Speaker Slide Presentation: Commercial Crew: On Course to Purposeful Flight (w/audio)

ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

John Mulholland, Vice President, and Program Manager for Commercial Programs, Space Exploration, The Boeing Company

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXPWvFSp8Hc?t=001

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Speaker Slide Presentation: Commercial Crew: On Course to Purposeful Flight (w/audio)

ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

Kathryn Lueders, Program Manager, Commercial Crew Program, NASA

Two American companies are on course, following their own unique paths to produce certified end-to-end crew transportation systems capable of flying astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Launchpads along Florida’s Space Coast have taken shape, spacecraft and launch vehicle hardware are being built and extensive qualification testing is underway for Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon systems. The companies are working diligently and purposefully with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program and the astronauts selected to train to fly flight tests to the International Space Station to ensure the systems are meeting the agency’s certification requirements and adequately addressing all credible hazards, including pad emergencies, in-flight aborts, and emergency landings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmYwlJ6dyCA?t=001



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SpaceX Mars / Re: Elon Musk Reddit AMA on BFR
« Last post by mgeagon on Today at 05:30 AM »
Take a brand new BFS (ship A) to Mars, in 2022 or 2024. That's what, 150 days travel then it sits while being unloaded, habitats established and proven, after that, it returns to earth. That's what,  another 150 days. The ship is now how old? At least a year old assuming establishing habitats is a priority, It could be much older.

How far will SpaceX advance the design of the currently new BFS's while ship A is making this round trip? Or another way of looking at it is, "How useful is a year or more old Falcon 9 these days?" Or, "Has SpaceX ever built a rocket that didn't undergo major evolutionary changes over the span of a year's time?"

In particular, we are addressing the first BFS's out of the box, not a mature, stable design as planned to exist by 2026.

I believe taking a look at the productuon runs of large transport category aircraft is instructive. The first few planes out of the factory are largely hand built, with tooling modified on the go and quality control standards yet to be developed. These aircraft are then added to the certification regimen and put through flight envelope testing. After a type certificate is issued by the FAA or other governmental agency, the test aircraft are refurbished and delivered to the launch customers.

These initial articles are typically overweight and are susceptible to long-term chronic maintenance, yet they continue to fly for decades. When major upgrades or airworthiness directives are issued, all aircraft of the same type are upgraded to the new standard.

It appears the business case for the BFR is predicated upon 1000 times reuse, meaning the development costs are spread between the number of ships built X the amount of flights they make. Counter to this would be a single flight to Mars and then becoming a museum piece in SITU. It would make much more fiscal sense to send the ship back to Earth for reuse. Even major upgrades to the engines or avionics would be far cheaper than scrapping the entire rocket. At least that is clearly true with atmospheric vehicles.
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Speaker Slide Presentation: Leveraging CRS to Expand LEO Commercialization (no audio)

ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

Frank DeMauro, Vice President and General Manager, Advanced Programs Division, Space Systems Group, Orbital ATK

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EH-eobbBnIE?t=001

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Speaker Slide Presentation: Living and Working Environments of Commercial Space Systems (no audio)

ISPCS .com
Published on Oct 17, 2017

John Elbon, Vice President and General Manager, Space Exploration, The Boeing Company

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWWRrLK0kgg?t=001

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