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Will these be multi-user clean pads with a shared blockhouse?

Orbex stakes claim to European smallsat launch market

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The company is beginning planning for using the spaceport in northern Scotland that the British government announced July 15. That facility will be shared with Lockheed Martin, which plans to bring in another vehicle, most likely Rocket Lab’s Electron, to launch small satellites.

While Electron and Prime are similar in performance, they have a number of key differences, including different fuels: Electron uses RP-1 while Prime uses propane. Larmour said he expected that the two companies would have separate launch pads at the spaceport while sharing some common infrastructure, like range safety and site security.

“We’ll spend the next few months talking to all kinds of stakeholders involved,” he said. “Where it’s helpful to work in common, we’ll do it.”
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The goal of A6 was to cut A5 launch price in half. (Give or take) Looks so far as if that goal will be met, ~45% reduction IIRC. We'll find out once commercial customers talk about prices.
Is that competitive against what SpaceX and Blue Origin are expected to launch in the near future? Probably not that much.
Still, A6 will be a whole lot more competitive than continuing with A5.

The ~45% cost reduction is for A62, and is accompanied by a similar reduction in performance. A64 is actually the much better deal and is competitive, but only for double berthed GTO launches.
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Isn't Arianespace reducing the price of their rocket launches by 40-50% with the Ariane 6 in the next 2 years? That's a more significant reduction than SpaceX achieved with reusability so far and the Ariane 6 has at least as good a cost per kg as the Falcon 9.

1. It doesn't matter how much Arianespace has reduced their prices, they are still higher than what SpaceX will be offering for the same service.

2. It doesn't matter that SpaceX has not reduced the price of their service over time, since one reason for that could be that they were more efficient from the start.

3. The more important metric to look at is what are the costs of SpaceX vs Arianespace today and going forward.

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Furthermore, Arianespace is working towards reusability with Ariane Next.

Maybe that will result in some version of reusability, maybe not. It is unlikely to change the design of Ariane 6 enough to affect the basic price of the rocket to it's customers.

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They're are plenty of slow-moving, high cost launch providers out there, but Arianespace has been commercially competitive throughout the entire existence of SpaceX. It's commendable.

Ariane 5 is subsidized for every launch, so no, Ariane 5 has not been commercially competitive.

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I do think they need a better spokesperson though. The subsidy argument against SpaceX gets a little tiresome.

Pot calling the kettle black. Especially since SpaceX does not receive any formal subsidies like Arianespace does.

At best Arianespace can make a claim that SpaceX charges too much for the added value parts of government launch contracts, but even that is specious since SpaceX has to compete against other launch providers to win orders, so they don't have the ability to charge exorbitant prices. Ariane 5 does not have to compete with other European launch providers.
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Orion Parachutes Chalk Up Another Test Success in Arizona

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/orion-parachutes-chalk-up-another-test-success-in-arizona

Also part of [email protected]

NASA
Published on Jul 20, 2018

Another successful parachute test for Orion, how we’re getting back to the Moon, and an Apollo 11 virtual experience … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L06p8Jba45c?t=001

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No one else uses a full orbital system for abort tests. usually they use like a decommissioned ballistic missile or something. It doesn’t have to be identical.

Yes it does
It will count as one of five fast sub-cooled feulings demanded by NASA before they will allow astronauts to board before fueling for the Demo Mission 2.
Anything non-standard would likely violate the applicability.

It has to be identical for SpaceX since they want it to be one of the qualifying flights for the load 'n go process for Commercial Crew.

Otherwise, that would not be the case, an in-flight abort test doesn't need to use the full rocket. A smaller rocket can provide the same flight conditions for the abort.

“Same difference”
It has to be identical
Parallel universes excepted
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Oh, another article by Eric Berger. 🤮
At least his Amazon Rive is on the right continent...

Actually, since the CNES presentation [Link, NSF thread] we know that the Ariane situation seems not quite as bad as most of NSF thought.

The timeline is the interesting part:
-2019 Frog & Eagle demonstrators nobody seems to know much about. [Xodiac/Xaero(ish) ?]
2020-2021 Callisto demonstrator (with JAXA)
Q3 2021, Prometheus final review after test a 2 engine test campaign
2023-2025 Themis demonstrator, flying RTLS trajectories (likely #3 variant, it is pictured as that. A 5m Ariane class first stage, 7 engines)
2025-2030 CSG NG demonstrator nobody knows nutthing about at this time.
2025-2030 Ariane 6 evolution
2028-2030 Ariane Next

Too little too late? Sure! Welcome to Europe...
Better than most here thought? Absolutely.

The big item is to get Prometheus working. No air restartable engine no reuse. Simple as that.


@dante2308
The goal of A6 was to cut A5 launch price in half. (Give or take) Looks so far as if that goal will be met, ~45% reduction IIRC. We'll find out once commercial customers talk about prices.
Is that competitive against what SpaceX and Blue Origin are expected to launch in the near future? Probably not that much.
Still, A6 will be a whole lot more competitive than continuing with A5.
7
Delta IV Parker Solar Probe: Launching the Fastest Human-made Object

United Launch Alliance
Published on Jul 20, 2018

ULA Trajectory Engineer Nick Driver on launching NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission atop ULA's Delta IV Heavy rocket. Usually used for large satellites, in this case the heavy lifter is being used to give a small spacecraft a high-energy delivery to the sun.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77SG1EVBocQ?t=001

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Parker Solar Probe Trailer


NASA Goddard
Published on Jul 20, 2018

Parker Solar Probe is NASA's mission to the Sun. The spacecraft will launch summer 2018.

Learn more at www.nasa.gov/solarprobe.

Music credit: Luminous Skies [Underscore] by Andrew Prahlow

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
Genna Duberstein (USRA): Lead Producer
Steve Gribben (Johns Hopkins University/APL ): Animator

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLwdS3zBGhg?t=001

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 first of two 35-foot-tall Tail Service Mast Umbilicals

Inside KSC! for July 20, 2018

NASAKennedy
Published on Jul 20, 2018

This week in space news, aeroshells for the Orion spacecraft's Ascent Abort-2 flight test have arrived at Kennedy, and the first of two 35-foot-tall Tail Service Mast Umbilicals that will deliver propellants to the Space Launch System rocket is installed on the Mobile Launcher.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rItcUiPmh_Q?t=001



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aeroshells for the Orion spacecraft's Ascent Abort-2 flight test

Inside KSC! for July 20, 2018


NASAKennedy
Published on Jul 20, 2018

This week in space news, aeroshells for the Orion spacecraft's Ascent Abort-2 flight test have arrived at Kennedy, and the first of two 35-foot-tall Tail Service Mast Umbilicals that will deliver propellants to the Space Launch System rocket is installed on the Mobile Launcher.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rItcUiPmh_Q?t=001

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