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The important distinction to me is re-use of boosters that went to LEO. We haven't seen a re-used GTO flight or a third flight of the same booster. Those are important milestones that hopefully will happen in 2018. They may require block 5.
I agree those are important technical milestones. Given the thread is about customer views I was focused on the customer-related milestones. I would think this first LEO-LEO booster is a candidate for a third reflight but I wonít be surprised if both of your scenarios wait until Block 5 sometime next year.
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All hail the return of "The Great Unwashed One"... ;D
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I measured the distance between the two landing zones using the new Planet Labs measuring tool. They are only ~300 meters apart from center to center. The landing is going to be even more epic than I thought! I knew they would be close, but less than 1/5 of a mile close?  8)

I'm kind of curious about why one pad it black and the other white. If the black paint is radar reflective to make landings more precise, did they find radar reflective white paint, or integrate equivalent or better reflectivity in the concrete?

Or just to make it look cool.
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The important distinction to me is re-use of boosters that went to LEO. We haven't seen a re-used GTO flight or a third flight of the same booster. Those are important milestones that hopefully will happen in 2018. They may require block 5.
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There are two inflection points that Iím interested in seeing: 1) the point where customers ask SpaceX for used before SpaceX asks them and 2) the point where no one cares whether itís used or not and itís just a ride to space. It may be difficult to know exactly when we cross each of those but they seem like significant landmarks of the shift in thinking about reuse.

I suspect your 1st inflection point has happened. Itís not clear from this report in June whether customers approached SoaceX first or not. But if they hadnít by then Iíd be surprised if it hadnít happened since, especially with more reports since June of schedule benefits and NASA on-board.
I suspect youíre right that it has occurred, but since itís not confirmed and it seems an important one I included it. It also strikes me as nothing short of amazing as to how fast this has become normalized. It was just 9 months ago that we were watching the first reuse happen. It almost seems old hat at this point. And it seems to have rapidly gained momentum amongst customers.
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Thereís no footings under this slab. Instead itís laying directly on the ground. Thatís why itís so thick. If there were driven footings then the slab would be able to be much thinner. This is the same technique used for the actual bottom in slurry wall construction - where there are no driven piles under the building.
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Quote
Interesting note in this article about Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo flights at Spaceport America: theyíll take place on Thursdays, after training there Monday through Wednesday: http://www.dchieftain.com/news/space-tourism-to-launch-in/article_da9df51a-e05d-11e7-8b7d-2f5c4be72d91.html

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/942035939433615365
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There are two inflection points that Iím interested in seeing: 1) the point where customers ask SpaceX for used before SpaceX asks them and 2) the point where no one cares whether itís used or not and itís just a ride to space. It may be difficult to know exactly when we cross each of those but they seem like significant landmarks of the shift in thinking about reuse.

I suspect your 1st inflection point has happened. Itís not clear from this report in June whether customers approached SoaceX first or not. But if they hadnít by then Iíd be surprised if it hadnít happened since, especially with more reports since June of schedule benefits and NASA on-board.
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December 15, 2017
RELEASE 17-096

NASA Sends New Research to Space Station Aboard SpaceX Resupply Mission


An experiment in space manufacturing and an enhanced study of solar energy are among the research currently heading to the International Space Station following Fridayís launch of a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft at 10:36 a.m. EST.

Dragon lifted off on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida with more than 4,800 pounds of research equipment, cargo and supplies that will support dozens of the more than 250 investigations aboard the space station.

NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba will use the space stationís robotic arm to capture Dragon when it arrives at the station. Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will air on NASA Television and the agencyís website beginning at 4:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 17. Installation coverage is set to begin at 7:30 a.m.

Research materials flying inside Dragon's pressurized area include an investigation demonstrating the benefits of manufacturing fiber optic filaments in a microgravity environment. Designed by the company Made in Space, and sponsored by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), the investigation will attempt to pull fiber optic wire from ZBLAN, a heavy metal fluoride glass commonly used to make fiber optic glass. Results from this investigation could lead to the production of higher-quality fiber optic products for use in space and on Earth.

NASA's Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor, or TSIS-1, will measure the Sun's energy input to Earth. TSIS-1 measurements will be three times more accurate than previous capabilities, enabling scientists to study the Sunís natural influence on Earthís ozone, atmospheric circulation, clouds and ecosystems. These observations are essential for a scientific understanding of the effects of solar variability on the Earth system.

The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) will measure the orbital debris environment around the space station for two to three years. Once mounted on the exterior of the station, this one-square-meter sensor will provide near-real-time debris impact detection and recording. Research from this investigation could help lower the risks posed by orbital debris to human life and critical hardware.

This is SpaceXís 13th cargo flight to the space station under NASAís Commercial Resupply Services contract. Dragon is scheduled to depart the station in January 2018 and return to Earth with more than 3,600 pounds of research, hardware and crew supplies.

For more than 17 years, humans have lived and worked continuously aboard the International Space Station, advancing scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies, making research breakthroughs not possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space. A global endeavor, more than 200 people from 18 countries have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 2,100 research investigations from researchers in more than 95 countries.

Get breaking news, images and features from the space station on social media at:

https://instagram.com/iss

and

https://www.twitter.com/Space_Station
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Apparently zuma
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