Author Topic: Arianespace launch schedule  (Read 695335 times)

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1220 on: 07/06/2017 03:45 PM »
Why is Webb more important??? I think ESA will think otherwise....

I don't see why a telescope that many astronomers have been waiting ages for should be further delayed for an unnecessary delay like a schedule clash. I suspect there will be more than a few Americans questioning again the whole business of having ESA launch the Webb when this scheduling conflict becomes more widely known.

One might ask why ESA allowed this scheduling conflict to arise in the first place.

If Bepi Colombo misses its planetary launch window, it will have to be put into storage for a longer time, which might cause considerable costs. Launch windows for Webb come more often. Assuming both are ready at the time, i think, BepiColombo will get the preference for the launch slot.

Offline Star One

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Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1221 on: 07/06/2017 03:49 PM »
Why is Webb more important??? I think ESA will think otherwise....

I don't see why a telescope that many astronomers have been waiting ages for should be further delayed for an unnecessary delay like a schedule clash. I suspect there will be more than a few Americans questioning again the whole business of having ESA launch the Webb when this scheduling conflict becomes more widely known.

One might ask why ESA allowed this scheduling conflict to arise in the first place.

If Bepi Colombo misses its planetary launch window, it will have to be put into storage for a longer time, which might cause considerable costs. Launch windows for Webb come more often. Assuming both are ready at the time, i think, BepiColombo will get the preference for the launch slot.

And I can imagine the reaction by some if that happens that it's purely political that the European payload is picked over the US one. Plus you don't think that delaying Webb isn't going to cost money. If does I feel ESA should pick up the entire bill for it.

The fact that this has even occurred doesn't say much for ESA's ability to manage their payload flow as the conflict should have never arisen in the first place. It will probably also ensure that no such US payload is entrusted to them in future.
« Last Edit: 07/06/2017 03:51 PM by Star One »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1222 on: 07/06/2017 04:02 PM »
Bepi has a planetary launch window of just 8 weeks. That is much more important and would cost more if delayed more... then a telescope that can launch any other day.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1223 on: 07/06/2017 04:17 PM »
People calm down.
If I'm not mistaken, Arianespace can launch two Ariane 5 launches within a month, possibly even two weeks.
They have two launch tables, a launcher preparation building (BIF) and a Payload intergation building (BAF).
If they have the second launcher prepared (build-up) at the beginning of the first launch. They only have to move the 2th launcher to the BAF, mate the payload (already prepared) and do final checks.

https://twitter.com/BepiColombo/status/882895245951860736

Quote
BepiColombo‏ @BepiColombo
#BepiColombo launch window is ~8 weeks, starting 5 Oct 2018

Again don't worry.
Before and after these two launches Ariane 5 can't launch for about a month, if I'm not mistaken.
« Last Edit: 07/06/2017 04:18 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Star One

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1224 on: 07/06/2017 04:20 PM »
People calm down.
If I'm not mistaken, Arianespace can launch two Ariane 5 launches within a month, possibly even two weeks.
They have two launch tables, a launcher preparation building (BIF) and a Payload intergation building (BAF).
If they have the second launcher prepared (build-up) at the beginning of the first launch. They only have to move the 2th launcher to the BAF, mate the payload (already prepared) and do final checks.

https://twitter.com/BepiColombo/status/882895245951860736

Quote
BepiColombo‏ @BepiColombo
#BepiColombo launch window is ~8 weeks, starting 5 Oct 2018

Again don't worry.
Before and after these two launches Ariane 5 can't launch for about a month, if I'm not mistaken.
Thank you for the clarification as the Tweets posted above were seemingly misleading in this regard.

Offline xm11

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1225 on: 07/08/2017 06:30 PM »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1226 on: 07/09/2017 11:17 AM »
MetOP-C will be launched by a soyuz rocket.

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1227 on: 07/09/2017 03:50 PM »
MetOP-C will be launched by a soyuz rocket.
Already exists:

2018
October - MetOp-C - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-M - Kourou ELS

Online zubenelgenubi

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1228 on: 07/12/2017 02:35 AM »
Re: Potentially overlapping launch windows for BepiColombo and JWST in October 2018,
from BepiColombo Mercury mission tested for journey into ‘pizza oven’, dated July 10
Quote
Arianespace officials will meet with managers from both projects in September to determine which high-profile science mission will go first.
« Last Edit: 07/12/2017 02:35 AM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1229 on: 07/17/2017 11:02 AM »
Quote
DutchSpace‏ @DutchSpace 8m8 minutes ago

Mission swaps at #CSG Ariane5 #VA240 is now #Galileo in December, the ex VA240 is renamed to #VA241 and moves to next year

https://twitter.com/DutchSpace/status/886901660269805568

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1230 on: 07/17/2017 08:22 PM »
Gunter Krebs‏ @Skyrocket71
Does the VA241 (ex VA240) keep the HYLAS-4 and Al Yah 3 payloads or does this also change?

DutchSpace‏ @DutchSpace
changes.

Offline Salo

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1231 on: 07/17/2017 08:45 PM »
Launched:

2017:
№ – Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

01 - January 28 - Hispasat 36W-1 (Hispasat AG1) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT (VS16) - Kourou ELS - 01:03:34.428
02 - February 14 - Intelsat 32e (SkyBrasil-1) [EpicNG], Telkom-3S - Ariane 5 ECA (VA235) - Kourou ELA-3 - 21:39:07
03 - March 7 - Sentinel-2B - Vega (VV09) - Kourou ZLV -  01:49:24
04 - May 4 - SGDC 1, Koreasat-7 (Mugungwa 7) - Ariane 5 ECA (VA236) - Kourou ELA-3 - 21:50:07
05 - May 18 - SES-15 - Soyuz-ST-A/Fregat-M (VS17) - Kourou ELS - 11:54:53.193
06 - June 1 - ViaSat-2, EUTELSAT 172B - Ariane 5 ECA (VA237) - Kourou ELA-3 - 23:45:07
07 - June 28 - Hellas Sat 3-Inmarsat S EAN (HS3-IS/Europasat), GSAT-17 - Ariane 5 ECA (VA238) - Kourou ELA-3 - 21:15:07
08 - August 2 - OPTSAT-3000 (SHALOM), Venµs (VENUS) - Vega (VV10) - Kourou ZLV - 01:58:33

Planned launches

Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

2017

August 31  September    1   5 - Intelsat 37e, BSat-4a - Ariane 5 ECA (VA239) - Kourou ELA-3 - 21:51-22:24
NET September  November 8 - MN35-13 (Morocco EO Sat 1) - Vega (VV11) - Kourou ZLV ~01:00
October 18 - Hylas 4, Al Yah 3 - Ariane 5 ECA (VA240) - Kourou ELA-3
December 12 - Galileo-FOC FM15 (Nicole), Galileo-FOC FM16 (Zofia), Galileo-FOC FM17 (Alexandre), Galileo-FOC FM18 (Irina) - Ariane 5-ES (VA240) - Kourou ELA-3 ~18:30

2018
January 20 - ADM-Aeolus - Vega (VV11) - Kourou ZLV
early - SES-12, Intelsat 38 (Azerspace-2) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
early - O3b (x4 sats) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS
NET Q1  March - Hylas 4 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
NET March - DSN-1 (Superbird-8) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3 (or NLT September)
NET Q1 - SES-12 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
NET Q1 - Al Yah 3 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
NET Q1 - Intelsat 38 (Azerspace-2) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
NET Q1  Q2 - Hellas-Sat-4 (SaudiGeoSat-1) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
H1 - GSAT-11 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3 (or November (TBD) 2017)
May - GEO-KOMPSAT-2A (GK2A, Cheollian 2A) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
Q2 - CSO 1 (Composante Spatiale Optique-1) - Soyuz ST/Fregat - Kourou ELS (or Baikonur)
midyear - OneWeb smallsat (x10) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS
midyear - PRISMA (Precursore Iperspettrale della Missione Applicativa) - Vega - Kourou ZLV
Q3 - EUTELSAT 7C - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
H2 - EDRS-C (Hylas 3) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
H2 - Intelsat 39 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
NET October 5 - BepiColombo - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3 (or NLT November 31)
October 15 - JWST - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
October - MetOp-C - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-M - Kourou ELS
late - Horizons 3e - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3 (or H2)
late - Small Spacecraft Mission - Vega - Kourou ZLV
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM19 (Tara), Galileo-FOC FM20 (Samuel), Galileo-FOC FM21 (Anna), Galileo-FOC FM22 (Ellen) - Ariane 5-ES - Kourou ELA-3
TBD - Morocco EO Sat 2 - Vega - Kourou ZLV

piggybacked:
2017  Early - ESEO (FUNcube 4) - Vega (TBD) - Kourou
Q2 - TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiation from lightNIng and Sprites) - Vega - Kourou ZLV
TBD - Nano-JASMINE - Vega - Kourou ZLV

2019
March - Seosat (Ingenio) - Vega - Kourou ZLV
March - GEO-KOMPSAT-2B (GK2B, Cheollian 2B) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
H1 - CSG-1 (COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation-1), CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) - Soyuz ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or December 2018)
midyear - CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation-2) - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV
midyear - inaugural flight - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV
August - EarthCARE  - Vega C/ Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou
late - ViaSat-3 Americas - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3 (or Falcon Heavy)
late - O3b (x4 sats) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS
TBD - JCSat-17 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
TBD - Eutelsat Quantum - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
TBD - African Broadband Satellite (Thales High Throughput) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
TBD - OneWeb smallsat (x32) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS
TBD - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS
TBD - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS
TBD - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or 2020)
TBD - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or 2020)
TBD - OpSIS - Vega - Kourou ZLV
TBD - Falcon Eye 1 - Vega - Kourou ZLV
TBD - Falcon Eye 2 - Vega - Kourou ZLV

2020
January 31 - Euclid - Soyuz ST-B/Fregat MT - Kourou ELS (or December)
early - CERES (x3) - Vega-С - Kourou ZLV
May - Jason-CS A (Sentinel-6A) - Vega-C (TBD) - Kourou ZLV (or midyear)
midyear - ViaSat 3 EMEA - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3 (or Falcon Heavy)
July 16 - inaugural flight - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
late - Airbus VHR sat-1, Airbus VHR sat-2 - Vega-С - Kourou ZLV
late 2019  late - PROBA 3 Coronagraph, PROBA 3 Occulter - Vega (TBD) - Kourou ZLV
December - MTG-I1 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
TBD - ViaSat 3 Asia - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
TBD -  Arsat 3 - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM23, Galileo-FOC FM24 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Galileo-FOC FM25, Galileo-FOC FM26 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - MicroCarb - Vega-C / Soyuz (TBD) - Kourou
TBD - Space Rider flight 1 - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV
TBD - Seosat-Ingenio-2 - TBD - Kourou

2021
Q2 - MetOp-SG A1 (EPS-SG-a, Sentinel-5A) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-M - Kourou ELS (or June) (or Falcon 9)
TBD - Comsat NG 1 (Syracuse 4A) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3 (or 2020)
TBD - CNES/UAE Mars mission - TBD - Kourou
TBD - BIOMASS - TBD - Kourou
TBD - CSO 2 (Composante Spatiale Optique-2) - Soyuz ST/Fregat - Kourou ELS
TBD - inaugural flight - Ariane 62 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Airbus VHR sat-3, Airbus VHR sat-4 - Vega-С - Kourou ZLV
TBD - Heinrich Hertz (H2Sat) - Ariane 5 ECA/Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-3/ELA-4
TBD - Space Rider flight 2 - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV

piggybacked:
December - MERLIN (MEthane Remote sensing LIdar missioN) - Vega-C/Soyuz  (TBD) - Kourou (or Q4)

2022
Q1 - MTG-S1 (Sentinel-4A) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
June - JUICE - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
December - MetOp-SG B1 (EPS-SG-b) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-M - Kourou ELS (or Falcon 9)
TBD - Comsat NG 2 (Syracuse 4B) - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
TBD - FLEX (Fluorescence Explorer satellite) - Vega-C (TBD) - Kourou ZLV
TBD - CryoSat FO - Vega-C (TBD) - Kourou ZLV
TBD - Moon’s south pole samples return mission - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Space Rider flight 3 - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV

2023
Q2 - Sentinel-1C - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS
TBD - Space Rider flight 4 - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV

2024
Q2 - Sentinel-2C - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV
December - MTG-I2 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
TBD - Space Rider flight 5 - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV

2025
early - Sentinel-3C - Vega-C - Kourou ZLV
early - Sentinel-7A - TBD - Kourou
Q2 - Sentinel-1D - TBD - Kourou
Q2 - Jason-CS B (Sentinel-6B) - Vega-C (TBD) - Kourou ZLV
midyear - Sentinel-9 - TBD - Kourou
midyear - Sentinel-10 - TBD - Kourou
Q4 - Sentinel-8 - TBD - Kourou
TBD - ARIEL (M4 mission candidate) - TBD - Kourou
TBD - THOR (M4 mission candidate) - TBD - Kourou
TBD - XIPE (M4 mission candidate) - TBD - Kourou
TBD - ESA Earth Explorer-9 - TBD - Kourou

2026
late - Sentinel-3D - TBD - Kourou
TBD - PLATO - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS

2027
Q4  - Sentinel-2D - TBD - Kourou

2028
January - ATHENA+ - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
early - Sentinel-7B - TBD - Kourou
June - MetOp-SG A2 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
December - MTG-I3 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2029
July - MTG-S2 (Sentinel-4B) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4 (or December 2030)
December - MetOp-SG B2 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2030
late - Sentinel-7C - TBD - Kourou

2032
December - MTG-I4 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2034
TBD - eLISA (NGO) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4 (or 2029)

2035
June - MetOp-SG A3 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

2036
December - MetOp-SG B3 - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4

Unclear:
Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

NLT 2020 - Galileo-FOC FM27, Galileo-FOC FM28 - TBD - Kourou
NLT 2020 - Galileo-FOC FM29, Galileo-FOC FM30 - TBD - Kourou
NET 2020 - GO-3S - Ariane 5 ECA - Kourou ELA-3
NET 2020 - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or Baikonur)
NET 2020 - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or Baikonur)
NET 2020 - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or Baikonur)
NET 2020 - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or Baikonur)
NET 2020 - OneWeb smallsat (x32-36) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT - Kourou ELS (or Baikonur)
NET 2021 - OneWeb smallsat (xTBD) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2021 - OneWeb smallsat (xTBD) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2021 - OneWeb smallsat (xTBD) - Ariane 6 - Kourou ELA-4
2021-2022 - Dream Chaser - Ariane 64 - Kourou ELA-4
NET 2022 - THR NG - TBD - Kourou
early 2020s - Pléiades FO 1 - TBD - Kourou
early 2020s - Pléiades FO 2 - TBD - Kourou
2024 (TBD) - CarbonSat - Vega-C (TBD) - Kourou ZLV
2026 (TBD) - Jason-CS Follow-on A - Vega-C (TBD) - Kourou ZLV
NET 2028 - Sentinel-1A 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
NET 2028 - Sentinel-2A 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
NET 2028 - Sentinel-3A 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
2029-2030 - M5 mission - TBD - Kourou
2031 - M6 mission - TBD - Kourou ELS
2030's - test flight - Ariane Next (Ariane 7) - Kourou
TBD - CSO 3 (Composante Spatiale Optique-3) - Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT TBD  - Kourou ELS
TBD - Sentinel-1B 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-1C 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-2B 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-3B 2nd Gen - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-5B - TBD - Kourou
TBD - Sentinel-5C - TBD - Kourou
TBD - GOCE-FO - TBD - Kourou

piggybacked:
2017 - VNREDSat-1b - Vega - Kourou ZLV

Statistics:
Orbital launches from CSG - 274 (Diamant B - 5, Europa II - 1, Diamant BP.4 - 3, Ariane 1 - 11, Ariane 3 - 11, Ariane 2 - 6, Ariane 4 - 116, Ariane 5 - 94, Soyuz ST - 17, Vega - 10)

Changes on July 17th
Changes on July 18th
Changes on July 20th
Changes on August 2nd
Changes on August 12th
Changes on August 13th
Changes on August 16th
Changes on August 19th
Changes on August 22nd
« Last Edit: 08/22/2017 01:33 PM by Salo »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1232 on: 07/18/2017 06:52 PM »
Quote
More #CSG updates: #Ariane5 #VA239 moves 1 day to 1st of September, #Vega #VV11 is planned for November.

https://twitter.com/dutchspace/status/887383797272113152

Offline Star One

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1233 on: 08/01/2017 04:33 PM »
Cross-posting this.

Spaceport schedule conflict could delay JWST launch

Quote
At a meeting of the NASA Advisory Council’s science committee July 24, Alan Boss, an astronomer at the Carnegie Institution and a member of the Astrophysics Advisory Committee, warned that BepiColombo could take precedence over JWST for that October 2018 launch slot.

“BepiColombo has rights to launch before James Webb does,” he said in a summary of a meeting of that advisory committee earlier in the month.

Quote
While the Ariane 5 is capable of flying at a relatively high cadence — three Ariane 5 rockets launched in May and June of this year — the extensive payload processing requirements of both BepiColombo and JWST appear to rule out launching both missions around the same time.

“It’s unclear if BepiColombo will be out of the way” before JWST arrives at Kourou for launch preparations, Boss said. He believed JWST needed three to six months of “full access” to facilities at Kourou to prepare for launch. “You really want to have BepiColombo long gone before you move in and start taking over.”

If BepiColombo sticks to its current schedule, that could mean delaying JWST by several months. “There’s some concern that that October 2018 launch may actually slip into the spring of 2019,” he said.

That schedule conflict is due in part to delays in the development of BepiColombo. The mission’s launch has slipped several times in the last decade. In 2007, when ESA approved moving the mission into its development phase, it was expected to launch on a Soyuz rocket in 2013.

Quote
Boss noted BepiColombo’s delays in his presentation, suggesting that the mission could face additional delays. ESA officials, though, said at an event in early July that the spacecraft was on scheduled to ship to French Guiana in early 2018 to being final launch preparations.

“We are looking forward to completing the final tests this year, and shipping to Kourou on schedule,” Ulrich Reininghaus, project manager for BepiColombo at ESA, said in a July 6 statement about the completion of the latest series of tests of the spacecraft. That statement added that the launch schedule for the mission would be confirmed later this year.

Quote
Additional problems, however, could lead to delays in JWST regardless of any launch site conflicts. “There’s some concern that they might be running out of funded schedule reserve,” Boss said, particularly as the project goes into critical final assembly and testing activities. “There’s some concern, but the JWST folks are confident they will overcome the remaining hurdles and get it done on time.”

http://spacenews.com/spaceport-schedule-conflict-could-delay-jwst-launch/

Offline TampaRay

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1234 on: 08/15/2017 01:26 PM »
"Another #CSG update: #Ariane5 #VA239 planned for 5th of September at 18:51 local"

Source: https://twitter.com/DutchSpace/status/897438188322660352

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1235 on: 08/19/2017 08:36 AM »
Cross-posting this.

I can't see how availability of payload processing facilities at CSG could be a problem.
Look into any Arianespace launcher User's manual, for example Ariane5, and you'll find out there are three payload processing facilities at CSG.
S1 is located north of the Jupiter launch control center, it can accomodate basic processing activities for two or three satellites (comsat size).
S3 is located at the ELA-2 zone. There are two buildings used for hazardous payload processing operations. One building is dedicated to Soyuz launches, the other is used for satellite fuelling operations.
Lastly there is the S5 zone, located beside the road between Kourou and the CSG launch zones. S5 can accomodate three or four payloads simultaneously,  and is suited for all payload preparation processes.
I think both JWST and BepiColumbo will be prepared inside the S5 facilities.

Could someone with more knowledge about payload preparation and the facilities at CSG react on this please?

Offline Jester

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1236 on: 08/19/2017 09:58 AM »
Cross-posting this.

I can't see how availability of payload processing facilities at CSG could be a problem.
Look into any Arianespace launcher User's manual, for example Ariane5, and you'll find out there are three payload processing facilities at CSG.
S1 is located north of the Jupiter launch control center, it can accomodate basic processing activities for two or three satellites (comsat size).
S3 is located at the ELA-2 zone. There are two buildings used for hazardous payload processing operations. One building is dedicated to Soyuz launches, the other is used for satellite fuelling operations.
Lastly there is the S5 zone, located beside the road between Kourou and the CSG launch zones. S5 can accomodate three or four payloads simultaneously,  and is suited for all payload preparation processes.
I think both JWST and BepiColumbo will be prepared inside the S5 facilities.

Could someone with more knowledge about payload preparation and the facilities at CSG react on this please?

what is your question ?

FYI:
S1 has S1A and S1B, S1A is reserved for Galileo usage, this leaves on S1B for other S/C processing (there are exceptions but not currently)

S3 has mainly S3B (HN and HR) sides in use, which is used for both Soyuz and Ariane launches to do Hazardous processing (fueling etc) and mating with Fregat, in the "old" days also fregat was processed there, this is now done in the new F3 (F cube) building at ELS

S5 has S5A B C D and E, where S5A B and C are used for S/C prep/integration/filling, S5D is usually used for decontamination (after prop filling etc.) S5E is for personnel

Offline razvan777

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1237 on: 08/21/2017 10:25 AM »
Is 12 December 2017 confirmed for the Galileo Ariane 5 launch? Does this come from a reliable source? I haven't seen it posted elsewhere yet.

I want to visit the space center in French Guiana and watch the launch, and I need to make the necessary travel arrangements. Thanks.

Offline bolun

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1238 on: 08/21/2017 10:26 AM »
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Proba_Missions/ESA_s_Proba-3_will_create_artificial_solar_eclipses

Quote
Aiming for launch in late 2020, Proba-3 is not one but two small metre-scale satellites, lining up to cast a precise shadow across space to block out the solar disc for six hours at a time, and give researchers a sustained view of the Sun’s immediate vicinity.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Arianespace launch schedule
« Reply #1239 on: 08/22/2017 09:29 AM »
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Owner @Avanti_plc says 28-GHz Hylas 4 Ka-band sat, built by @OrbitalATK, now set for @Arianespace launch in March, yr later than planned.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/899925844516372480