Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : ~ early December 2017 : DISCUSSION  (Read 9639 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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CRS-13 Discussion thread

NSF Threads for CRS-13 : Discussion

NSF Articles for CRS-13:

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Launch NET 1 November 2017 on Falcon 9 from LC-40



External cargo: Space Debris Sensor, MISSE-FF, TSIS



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 08/13/2017 07:32 PM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #1 on: 04/20/2017 01:24 PM »
Created the thread to have sonewhere to post this!

Quote
NASA's JC Liou of Orbital Debris Office: We expect our Space Debris Sensor to fly to ISS on Nov 1 @SpaceX's Falcon 9/Dragon.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/855045463711641601

Edit: so I can't count! CRS-12 is NET August, CRS-13 Nov.
« Last Edit: 04/20/2017 01:28 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #2 on: 05/03/2017 04:27 PM »
Space Debris Sensor Waiting For Launch
The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) has completed functional testing and been delivered to the Kennedy Space Center for final integration checkout with the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will go into storage until a SpaceX launch vehicle is ready to deliver it to the ISS.  Launch is currently scheduled for late 2017.

The SDS is a flight demonstration of an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize impacts by small debris objects. The sensor will be attached to the ESA Columbus module facing the ISS velocity vector with one square meter of detection area. The sensor combines multiple technologies to measure the time, speed, direction, size, and density of objects greater than 50 µm in size. With this information, as well as the orbital position of each detection, the sensor should collect enough data over its intended minimum 2-year mission to update the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model for objects smaller than 1 mm near ISS altitudes. With lessons learned from the SDS experience, a follow-on mission to place a second-generation sensor at higher altitudes will someday provide the ability to update the risk from small debris to many operational spacecraft in low Earth orbit.
« Last Edit: 05/10/2017 02:54 PM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #3 on: 07/19/2017 04:09 PM »
Tweet from Jeff Foust:
Quote
[Andrew Rush, Made In Space]: have built and qualified a pilot mfg facility for high-quality ZBLAN optical fibers. Scheduled to fly to ISS on SpX-13. #ISSRDC

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #4 on: 07/21/2017 12:45 AM »
Space Debris Sensor Waiting For Launch
The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) has completed functional testing and been delivered to the Kennedy Space Center for final integration checkout with the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will go into storage until a SpaceX launch vehicle is ready to deliver it to the ISS.  Launch is currently scheduled for late 2017.

The SDS is a flight demonstration of an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize impacts by small debris objects. The sensor will be attached to the ESA Columbus module facing the ISS velocity vector with one square meter of detection area. The sensor combines multiple technologies to measure the time, speed, direction, size, and density of objects greater than 50 µm in size. With this information, as well as the orbital position of each detection, the sensor should collect enough data over its intended minimum 2-year mission to update the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model for objects smaller than 1 mm near ISS altitudes. With lessons learned from the SDS experience, a follow-on mission to place a second-generation sensor at higher altitudes will someday provide the ability to update the risk from small debris to many operational spacecraft in low Earth orbit.
additional SDS reference from May: https://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/quarterly-news/pdfs/odqnv21i2.pdf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #5 on: 07/29/2017 02:40 PM »
Olaf found a reference saying ASIM is now planned to launch in 2018, so it appears the external payloads for CRS-13 will be SDS, MISSE-FF and TSIS.
« Last Edit: 07/29/2017 02:42 PM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #6 on: 07/29/2017 02:50 PM »
Sorry, I´ve modified my post.
TSIS will be launched NET 2018.
https://www.wmo-sat.info/oscar/satellites/view/529

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #7 on: 07/29/2017 07:23 PM »
Sorry, I´ve modified my post.
TSIS will be launched NET 2018.
https://www.wmo-sat.info/oscar/satellites/view/529

Hmmm, the project page at LASP still shows November.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #8 on: 07/29/2017 07:48 PM »
Tweet from LASP TSIS (@Go_TSIS) on July 23:
Quote
All packed up and ready to go. Here we come, Florida!

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #9 on: 07/29/2017 08:10 PM »
Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1)

Project page at University of Colorado Boulder - Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP)

TSIS-1 was originally intended for the NPOESS satellite program, with a $42 million contract given in 2009.  Next it was targeted for the Polar Free Flyer satellite program, and finally ended up as an instrument to be mounted on the ISS.

TSIS-1 has two instruments: the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) measures the total solar irradiance (TSI) that is incident at the outer boundaries of the atmosphere; and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) measures solar spectral irradiance (SSI) from 200 nm to 2400 nm (96 percent of the TSI).  TSIS-1 also has a precision pointing mechanism to aim the instruments.

Images from TSIS project page at CU Boulder - LASP
1. A close-up view of TSIS-1 as deployed on the International Space Station ExPRESS logistics carrier (ELC)-3. The TSIS-1 Thermal Pointing System (TPS) is deployed above the ELC after installation in order to provide sufficient clearance to track the sun each orbit with a two-axis gimbal. (Courtesy NASA/LASP)
2. TIM measures the total light coming from the sun at all wavelengths. (Courtesy LASP)
3. SIM will measure how the light from the sun is distributed by wavelength. (Courtesy LASP)

Also attached: Pdf presentation from Nov. 2015 giving an overview of TSIS-1.

[NASA Jul 20, 2017] NASA Looks to Solar Eclipse to Help Understand Earth’s Energy System
Quote
This fall, NASA will continue to monitor the sun-Earth relationship by launching the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor-1, or TSIS-1, to the International Space Station
« Last Edit: 07/31/2017 01:08 AM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #10 on: 07/29/2017 08:10 PM »
MISSE-FF : Materials International Space Station Experiment - Flight Facility

MISSE-FF will be mounted on the exterior of the ISS where it will hold materials samples to test their performance in space.  It will allow individual sample carriers to be robotically swapped out.  MISSE-FF is a commercial facility owned by Alpha Space that will host both goverment and private industry experiments.

There was a recent FISO Teleconference on MISSE-FF on April 5, 2017.  PDF and MP3 files are attached.
« Last Edit: 07/31/2017 01:20 AM by gongora »

Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #11 on: 07/30/2017 09:23 AM »
What is the average timeframe from arriving at the Cape until launch?
Or another question. Are three months enough from arrival to launch?
« Last Edit: 07/30/2017 01:06 PM by Olaf »

Offline DOCinCT

What is the average timeframe from arriving at the Cape until launch?
Or another question. Are three months enough from arrival to launch?
Based on pages 50 and 53 of the Falcon Users Guide Ver 2 ,
Launch campaign kickoff -
Verifies that all people, parts and paper are ready for the shipment of the payload to the launch site and are ready to begin launch site activities. This is 3 months until launch. 
Delivery of the spacecraft is generally 30 days in advance of launch. 

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #13 on: 07/30/2017 04:31 PM »
What is the average timeframe from arriving at the Cape until launch?
Or another question. Are three months enough from arrival to launch?
Based on pages 50 and 53 of the Falcon Users Guide Ver 2 ,
Launch campaign kickoff -
Verifies that all people, parts and paper are ready for the shipment of the payload to the launch site and are ready to begin launch site activities. This is 3 months until launch. 
Delivery of the spacecraft is generally 30 days in advance of launch.

The Falcon Users Guide is irrelevant for this.  It's a NASA science payload on a Dragon flight.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #14 on: 07/31/2017 05:45 AM »
Space Debris Sensor Waiting For Launch
The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) has completed functional testing and been delivered to the Kennedy Space Center for final integration checkout with the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will go into storage until a SpaceX launch vehicle is ready to deliver it to the ISS.  Launch is currently scheduled for late 2017.

The SDS is a flight demonstration of an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize impacts by small debris objects. The sensor will be attached to the ESA Columbus module facing the ISS velocity vector with one square meter of detection area.(snip)

Why would this be facing the velocity vector?
At first blush that would seem to be the direction of least debris flux.

Stuff at 400 km but going slower than the ISS would have a lower perigee.  That would take it into the denser atmosphere, where it's orbital lifetime would be less.  AIUI, that's why the ISS is flown at the altitude it does, so that the residual exosphere scrubs small debris from orbit.

Now a rearward facing surface would be exposed to debris with perigees at or below the ISS altitude but with higher apogees.  These would have higher velocity than the ISS and "catch up to it."

However, if one assumes that orbits circularize with greatest drag at perigee, small debris, with corresponding lower coefficients of drag, would act as if constantly being accelerated in the -V direction.  That would have them impinge from the front.

Does that mean that SDS expects minute debris to be in circularized orbits rather than elliptical?
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #15 on: 07/31/2017 06:07 AM »
Space Debris Sensor Waiting For Launch
The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) has completed functional testing and been delivered to the Kennedy Space Center for final integration checkout with the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will go into storage until a SpaceX launch vehicle is ready to deliver it to the ISS.  Launch is currently scheduled for late 2017.

The SDS is a flight demonstration of an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize impacts by small debris objects. The sensor will be attached to the ESA Columbus module facing the ISS velocity vector with one square meter of detection area.(snip)

Why would this be facing the velocity vector?
At first blush that would seem to be the direction of least debris flux.

Stuff at 400 km but going slower than the ISS would have a lower perigee.  That would take it into the denser atmosphere, where it's orbital lifetime would be less.  AIUI, that's why the ISS is flown at the altitude it does, so that the residual exosphere scrubs small debris from orbit.

Now a rearward facing surface would be exposed to debris with perigees at or below the ISS altitude but with higher apogees.  These would have higher velocity than the ISS and "catch up to it."

However, if one assumes that orbits circularize with greatest drag at perigee, small debris, with corresponding lower coefficients of drag, would act as if constantly being accelerated in the -V direction.  That would have them impinge from the front.

Does that mean that SDS expects minute debris to be in circularized orbits rather than elliptical?
I was thinking the idea was sort of like bugs and windshields. Your front windshield gets covered in them. The rear glass not so much. If you wanted to place a sensor to detect characteristics of bug-windshield impacts you'd want it on the front of the vehicle. That idea might not translate to orbit, but that's what I thought of as I read it.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #16 on: 07/31/2017 10:25 AM »
Space Debris Sensor Waiting For Launch
The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) has completed functional testing and been delivered to the Kennedy Space Center for final integration checkout with the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will go into storage until a SpaceX launch vehicle is ready to deliver it to the ISS.  Launch is currently scheduled for late 2017.

The SDS is a flight demonstration of an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize impacts by small debris objects. The sensor will be attached to the ESA Columbus module facing the ISS velocity vector with one square meter of detection area.(snip)

Why would this be facing the velocity vector?
At first blush that would seem to be the direction of least debris flux.

Stuff at 400 km but going slower than the ISS would have a lower perigee.  That would take it into the denser atmosphere, where it's orbital lifetime would be less.  AIUI, that's why the ISS is flown at the altitude it does, so that the residual exosphere scrubs small debris from orbit.

Now a rearward facing surface would be exposed to debris with perigees at or below the ISS altitude but with higher apogees.  These would have higher velocity than the ISS and "catch up to it."

However, if one assumes that orbits circularize with greatest drag at perigee, small debris, with corresponding lower coefficients of drag, would act as if constantly being accelerated in the -V direction.  That would have them impinge from the front.

Does that mean that SDS expects minute debris to be in circularized orbits rather than elliptical?

I would think crossing orbits (polar, for instance) would be greatest debris impact risk (and the highest relative velocity).
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Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #17 on: 07/31/2017 12:28 PM »
https://twitter.com/SpcPlcyOnline/status/889859004876419073

This chart by Mr. Zurbuchen also says 2018 for TSIS-1.
« Last Edit: 07/31/2017 12:36 PM by Olaf »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #18 on: 07/31/2017 02:15 PM »
So we have multiple recent references for TSIS-1 launching in both 2017 and 2018.  One issue to consider is November 2017 is in Fiscal Year 2018, so you have to keep that in mind when interpreting some of the charts.  Hopefully we'll find more definitive information about the schedule soon.
« Last Edit: 07/31/2017 02:23 PM by gongora »

Offline envy887

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #19 on: 07/31/2017 03:02 PM »
Space Debris Sensor Waiting For Launch
The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) has completed functional testing and been delivered to the Kennedy Space Center for final integration checkout with the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will go into storage until a SpaceX launch vehicle is ready to deliver it to the ISS.  Launch is currently scheduled for late 2017.

The SDS is a flight demonstration of an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize impacts by small debris objects. The sensor will be attached to the ESA Columbus module facing the ISS velocity vector with one square meter of detection area.(snip)

Why would this be facing the velocity vector?
At first blush that would seem to be the direction of least debris flux.

Stuff at 400 km but going slower than the ISS would have a lower perigee.  That would take it into the denser atmosphere, where it's orbital lifetime would be less.  AIUI, that's why the ISS is flown at the altitude it does, so that the residual exosphere scrubs small debris from orbit.

Now a rearward facing surface would be exposed to debris with perigees at or below the ISS altitude but with higher apogees.  These would have higher velocity than the ISS and "catch up to it."

However, if one assumes that orbits circularize with greatest drag at perigee, small debris, with corresponding lower coefficients of drag, would act as if constantly being accelerated in the -V direction.  That would have them impinge from the front.

Does that mean that SDS expects minute debris to be in circularized orbits rather than elliptical?

I would think crossing orbits (polar, for instance) would be greatest debris impact risk (and the highest relative velocity).

Yes. An object in an intersecting polar orbit would approach at a quartering angle from the front, at over 10 km/s relative velocity. An object in a overtaking orbit (like a GTO at perigee) could approach from behind, but would have no more than ~3 km/s relative velocity.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #20 on: 08/01/2017 03:42 AM »
Why would this [SDS/Dragons] be facing the velocity vector?
At first blush that would seem to be the direction of least debris flux.

(snip)

I would think crossing orbits (polar, for instance) would be greatest debris impact risk (and the highest relative velocity).

Good point on the risk and velocity, but wouldn't those impact on the sides? 
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #21 on: 08/01/2017 10:39 AM »
Why would this [SDS/Dragons] be facing the velocity vector?
At first blush that would seem to be the direction of least debris flux.

(snip)

I would think crossing orbits (polar, for instance) would be greatest debris impact risk (and the highest relative velocity).

Good point on the risk and velocity, but wouldn't those impact on the sides?

Forward quarters, since sum of velocity vectors involved.  Descending polar plus ascending ISS would put peak velocity particles on leading face.
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #22 on: 08/04/2017 08:15 PM »
[LASP : August 4, 2017] TSIS shipped to Kennedy Space Center for upcoming launch
Quote
A solar instrument package designed and built by LASP, considered a key tool to help monitor the planet’s climate, has arrived at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a targeted November launch.

The instrument suite is called the Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1) and was built for NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The contract value to LASP is $90 million and includes the dual instrument suite and an associated ground system to manage TSIS mission operations.

photo credit: TSIS-1 is shown here inside a clean room at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (Courtesy LASP/Tom Sparn)

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #23 on: 08/04/2017 08:54 PM »
Leadup to the previous post

lasp.colorado.edu/home/blog/2017/08/04/tsis-shipped-to-kennedy-space-center-for-upcoming-launch/

TSIS shipped to Kennedy Space Center for upcoming launch

Posted August 4th, 2017

TSIS-1 is shown here inside a clean room at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (Courtesy LASP/Tom Sparn)

A solar instrument package designed and built by LASP, considered a key tool to help monitor the planet’s climate, has arrived at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a targeted November launch.

The instrument suite is called the Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1) and was built for NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The contract value to LASP is $90 million and includes the dual instrument suite and an associated ground system to manage TSIS mission operations.

TSIS-1 will launch on a commercial SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in a Dragon capsule for delivery to the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will monitor the total amount of sunlight hitting Earth, as well as how the light is distributed among the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared wavelengths.

“We need to measure both because both affect Earth’s climate,” said Dong Wu, the TSIS-1 project scientist at NASA Goddard.

LASP Atmospheric Scientist Peter Pilewskie, lead mission scientist on the project, said TSIS will continue a 39-year record of measuring total solar radiation, the longest continuous climate record from space.

“These measurements are vital for understanding the climate system because the sun is the source of virtually all of Earth’s energy,” said Pilewskie, also a CU Boulder faculty member in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. “How the atmosphere responds to subtle changes in the sun’s output helps us distinguish between natural and human influences on climate.”

Overall satellite measurements of the sun from space have shown that changes in its radiation over time—during periods of both high and low solar activity—is only about 0.1 percent. While scientists believe changes in solar output cannot explain Earth’s recent warming, a longer dataset could reveal greater swings in solar radiation.

TSIS-1 is comprised of the Total Irradiance Monitor, or TIM, which measures the total solar irradiance that is incident at the outer boundaries of the atmosphere; and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor, or SIM, which measures solar spectral irradiance (SSI) from 200 nm to 2400 nm (96 percent of the TSI). (Courtesy LASP)

TSIS consists of two instruments, including the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), which measures the total light coming from the sun at all wavelengths, said Pilewskie. The second LASP instrument, the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), will measure how the light from the sun is distributed by wavelength and absorbed by different parts of the planet’s atmosphere and surface.

One reason the SIM instrument is important is because measurements of the sun’s UV radiation are critical to understanding the condition of Earth’s protective ozone layer.

The TSIS instrument suite will be operated remotely from the LASP Space Technology Building in the CU Research Park.

The project involved about 30 scientists and engineers at LASP during its peak, as well as 10 additional support personnel from Colorado and about 10 more from outside of Colorado, said TSIS-1 Project Manager Brian Boyle of LASP. The mission, slated to run at least five years, also has involved about 15 to 20 CU-Boulder undergraduate and graduate students to date.

LASP has made solar radiation measurements from orbit on seven missions since 1975, including the $100 million SORCE satellite designed, built, and controlled from campus.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #24 on: 08/08/2017 06:36 PM »
With OA-8 reportedly looking to go up in October or November, will this push CRS-12 back?  Or would both missions go up in the same month?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #25 on: 08/08/2017 07:02 PM »
With OA-8 reportedly looking to go up in October or November, will this push CRS-12 back?  Or would both missions go up in the same month?

Cygnus and Dragon have launched a couple weeks apart before, it's not a big deal.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #26 on: 08/11/2017 06:40 PM »
http://spacenews.com/teledyne-brown-offers-iss-platform-for-testing-spacecraft-parts-in-orbit-before-flying-them-for-real/
Quote
Teledyne Brown Engineering plans to install a hyperspectral imager built by the German Aerospace Center, DLR, in the firm’s International Space Station observatory in March.
DLR’s Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer will be the first payload tested on the Multi-User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES), Teledyne Brown’s external Earth-facing platform that traveled to the space station in June inside a SpaceX Dragon cargo capsule.

This presentation from February says that
Quote
[MUSES] Instruments launched in “soft stowage”
Quote
DESIS
•Critical Design Review completed June 2016
•Planned launch on SpaceX-13, Q4, 2017
•DESIS commissioning during Q1/Q2,2018

Does anyone know if that is still the plan?
« Last Edit: 08/11/2017 06:40 PM by gongora »

Offline Ragmar

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #27 on: 08/12/2017 05:58 PM »
However, as this is an extended duration Cygnus mission, will NASA delay this 1) so will they have the requirement for two missions at the same time, and 2) berthing port capacity?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #28 on: 08/13/2017 06:24 PM »
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43347.msg1712257#msg1712257
Quote
Soyuz 50S return on 9/02
Soyuz 52S launch on 9/13
Progress in Oct.
Cygnus from Virginia in November.
Triple EVA in early-October thru November to change out LEE on the SSRMS.
No mention of Dragon in November, I would suggest NET December or 2018.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #29 on: 08/13/2017 06:45 PM »
around early December (from CRS-12 pre-launch press conference)
« Last Edit: 08/13/2017 06:59 PM by gongora »

Online gongora

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[SpaceNews] 3-D printing and in-orbit manufacturing promise to transform space missions
Quote
Q: What is the latest on your [Made In Space] optical fiber campaign?

A: It’s going really well. The flight unit is built and we are scheduled to fly on a [SpaceX] Dragon this year. We have produced fiber in our facility on the ground and are looking forward to flying that. We will be flying the payload multiple times on multiple flights because the focus is on making the minimum viable product that is scalable.

This is a fully robotic capability. The astronauts just plug it in. We send the signal for it to go. It pulls the fiber and monitors diameter. When it’s done, it can switch over to another free form, that’s the starting material we use, and produce more fiber without any special environment on the ISS, without significant crew involvement other than installation. ...

The article also mentions a failed protest Made In Space filed against a NASA SBIRS award to another company working on manufacturing fiber in space.  The decision said Made In Space didn't have standing to protest the award.  The GAO decision can be found here:
https://www.gao.gov/products/B-414490#mt=e-report

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