Author Topic: Elon Musk keynote address at ISSR&D Conference - July 19, 2017  (Read 66192 times)

Online Chris Bergin

Presser:

SpaceX Founder Elon Musk Named as Keynote Speaker at the 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference in Washington, D.C.

 

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL. (March 28, 2017) – The International Space Station Research and Development Conference (ISSR&D) today announced that Elon Musk, CEO and lead designer at Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), has been confirmed as a keynote speaker at its 6th annual meeting at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C. from July 17-20, 2017. The ISSR&D Conference was created to connect commercial and academic communities involved in new innovations, breakthroughs, and discoveries onboard humankind’s unique orbiting laboratory. This event is held in coordination with the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), the American Astronautical Society (AAS), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

 

Founded in 2002 by Musk, SpaceX’s mission is to enable humans to become a spacefaring civilization and a multi-planet species by building a self-sustaining city on Mars. In 2008, SpaceX’s Falcon 1 became the first privately developed liquid-fuel launch vehicle to orbit the Earth. Following that milestone, NASA awarded SpaceX with contracts to carry cargo and crew to the International Space Station (ISS). A global leader in commercial launch services, SpaceX is the first commercial provider to launch and recover a spacecraft from orbit, attach a commercial spacecraft to the ISS and successfully land an orbital-class rocket booster. By pioneering the development of fully and rapidly reusable rockets and spacecraft, SpaceX is dramatically reducing the cost of access to space, the first step in making life on Mars a reality in our lifetime.

 

Within his role at SpaceX, Musk oversees the development and manufacturing of advanced rockets and spacecraft for missions to and beyond Earth orbit. He is also the co-founder, CEO and product architect of Tesla, which makes electric cars, giant batteries and solar products. He is the co-founder and chairman of OpenAI, a nonprofit research company working to build safe artificial intelligence and ensure that AI's benefits are as widely and evenly distributed as possible.

 

“We are thrilled to have Elon Musk join the 2017 ISSR&D Conference as a keynote speaker,” said CASIS President and Executive Director Gregory H. Johnson. “The ISSR&D Conference truly represents the crossroads of innovation for a growing community of space researchers, partners, investors and technologists. Elon is both an inspiration and a driving force in this exciting market.”

 

CASIS and NASA leadership will also present new opportunities that the ISS can bring to researchers from a variety of scientific disciplines and backgrounds. Current ISS users from across a wide spectrum of commercial and academic entities will have the opportunity to present their findings at the conference. The conference is now accepting calls for abstracts, which can be submitted at: http://www.issconference.org/#abstracts 

 

Registration for the 2017 conference is now open. To learn more about the 2017 ISSR&D Conference, including how to register, please visit: http://www.issconference.org/

 

 

About CASIS: The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) was selected by NASA in July 2011 to maximize use of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory. CASIS is dedicated to supporting and accelerating innovations and new discoveries that will enhance the health and wellbeing of people and our planet. For more information, visit www.iss-casis.org.

 

 

About the ISS National Laboratory: In 2005, Congress designated the U.S. portion of the International Space Station as the nation's newest national laboratory to maximize its use for improving life on Earth, promoting collaboration among diverse users, and advancing STEM education. This unique laboratory environment is available for use by other U.S. government agencies and by academic and private institutions, providing access to the permanent microgravity setting, vantage point in low Earth orbit, and varied environments of space.

 

About AAS:  The American Astronautical Society is America’s premier network of space professionals, technical and non-technical, dedicated to advancing all space activities.  The Society, founded in 1954, is committed to strengthening the nation’s space programs, inspiring the next generation of space professionals and expanding cooperation with international space organizations.

Offline docmordrid

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Wonder if he'll drop any info that'll set of another Twitter-storm?
DM

Offline dglow

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Likely an update on Dragon and commercial crew. Maybe lunar flyby. Mars might be off-topic, but no reason for that to stop him.   ::)
« Last Edit: 03/29/2017 02:41 AM by dglow »

Online Chris Bergin

I assume this is still on for Wednesday....

https://www.issconference.org/agenda/


Offline vaporcobra

I assume this is still on for Wednesday....

https://www.issconference.org/agenda/

I am coincidentally going to be in attendance, will ask the organizers tomorrow morning if they are aware if Musk is still scheduled to give a talk.

Offline vaporcobra

I assume this is still on for Wednesday....

https://www.issconference.org/agenda/

I am coincidentally going to be in attendance, will ask the organizers tomorrow morning if they are aware if Musk is still scheduled to give a talk.

Brief update: person in charge of registering attendees and someone hosting a discussion both implied that Musk's talk was still on for tomorrow.

Offline vaporcobra

ITS could become off topic, but I get why it was mentioned, per if there's no Red Dragon.

You know, SpaceX and a fair few SpaceXers follow me on Twitter. The thought is....let's shake the tree on social media. The MOST that will happen is it MIGHT get back to Elon to say something on the matter (big ask, but he's about to make a keynote and he's not one to stick to a written script).

FWIW, I'll be physically attending for Teslarati's coverage of the keynote. Not sure if it will happen, but if there is a Q&A after his talk, I'd be happy to try and ask a question, and I'd be happy to have NSF crowdsource that question.

Offline jpo234

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FWIW, I'll be physically attending for Teslarati's coverage of the keynote. Not sure if it will happen, but if there is a Q&A after his talk, I'd be happy to try and ask a question, and I'd be happy to have NSF crowdsource that question.

That's an interesting challenge. It should be a question with a good chance that Elon gives a meaningful answer and yet it should reveal something we don't know or strongly suspect yet.

Directly asking whether Red Dragon is buried will only get a reference to the coming Mars update, IMHO.

I would ask something about the progress on Raptor.

Online Chris Bergin

NASA TV have started webcasting the event:
https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

So that's hopeful for tomorrow. Numerous people will live stream it otherwise, per Twitter responses.

Offline Lar

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Time is short but it might even be good to have a backup question or two in case the first one gets answered before your turn (as Helodriver did)

Something about raptor is definitely useful, if you could tie it into the AF contract and whether CommsX will use a methalox S2 on the existing F9/FH might be good?

Asking him if he thinks the more affordable first version of ITS hinted at will be launching from Florida (39A or 40) might be really useful.

Also asking whether there will be more D1 pressure vessels built now that they're being rebuilt, or if that line is switched to D2 might be good

Anything is good though, just don't be the "pooping in space" guy :)

And thanks! You rock.

(none of those are directly Red Dragon related though, so maybe something about ISRU plans for Red Dragon might elicit something?)
« Last Edit: 07/18/2017 10:41 PM by Lar »
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline Callezetter

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Preview of the agenda for tomorrow

Offline vaporcobra

Time is short but it might even be good to have a backup question or two in case the first one gets answered before your turn (as Helodriver did)

Something about raptor is definitely useful, if you could tie it into the AF contract and whether CommsX will use a methalox S2 on the existing F9/FH might be good?

Asking him if he thinks the more affordable first version of ITS hinted at will be launching from Florida (39A or 40) might be really useful.

Also asking whether there will be more D1 pressure vessels built now that they're being rebuilt, or if that line is switched to D2 might be good

Anything is good though, just don't be the "pooping in space" guy :)

And thanks! You rock.

(none of those are directly Red Dragon related though, so maybe something about ISRU plans for Red Dragon might elicit something?)

Thanks for moving the thread to the proper place.

Great ideas, Lar and jpo. I fully agree that specifically asking for details about ITS/BFS/Red Dragon would likely result in references to the 2017 IAC and waiting until then, so I'll try to avoid that.

Something about Raptor would be timely, as I could segue into the question by mentioning Shotwell's "dozens of tests" comment on The Space Show.

Questions about D1 vs. D2 manufacturing/progress could also be good, but the venue and conference subject would lend itself to a significant CCtCap/CRS update. Maybe not, though, so I'll keep that one in mind based on what Musk ends up talking about. I'd also love to ask about plans for propulsive landing of Dragon, the rumored demise of which has caused a good deal of drama...

There is also, of course, a question as to why 029 landing footage/photos never transpired.

I think I'll order them likewise:

1. Raptor progress?
2. Plans to still develop propulsive Dragon recovery?
3. B1029 landing/roomba footage?


P.S. Never thought I'd be so excited about lettuce seeds ;D
« Last Edit: 07/19/2017 02:11 AM by vaporcobra »

Online Robotbeat

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Ask two questions:
1) When will Raptor first leave the ground?
And
2) When will Raptor first reach orbit?
And, if you have time for a third, ask:
3) When will Raptor first reach Mars? Then: with people?

We kinda already know Dragon won't be propulsively landing. Reddit told us that already.
« Last Edit: 07/19/2017 04:28 AM by Lar »
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline vaporcobra

It's a deal. Those sound like solid questions to me. I'll probably modify with "When does SpaceX want Raptor to first..."
« Last Edit: 07/19/2017 04:00 AM by vaporcobra »

Offline Lar

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We kinda already know Dragon won't be propulsively landing. Reddit told us that already.

I'd like to  know WHY though.. not the same priority as some of the other questions (your other ones are better) but in case they all get answered by the time Vaporcobra gets a turn?

Vaporcobra are you going to plant those?

« Last Edit: 07/19/2017 04:30 AM by Lar »
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline yokem55

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Asking about raptor might get a better response if asking specifically if the 1MN version has a production future or if it's only a test bed for developing a full size raptor. 

Online Robotbeat

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We kinda already know Dragon won't be propulsively landing. Reddit told us that already.

I'd like to  know WHY though.. not the same priority as some of the other questions (your other ones are better) but in case they all get answered by the time Vaporcobra gets a turn?

Vaporcobra are you going to plant those?
The reason why is because they want to accelerate ITS (way better than Red Dragon) and especially because it was getting in the way of putting crew on Dragon. This way they can just use all the guidance mechanics they've been using for cargo Dragon.

Let's say Red Dragon and propulsive landing would cost SpaceX a total of $200 million. Wouldn't they rather just finish a subscale ITS with that money?
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline DJPledger

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Another question: Has Raptor's thrust changed since the IAC2016 announcement and if so what is the new thrust rating of it?

Online MikeAtkinson

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F9 block 5 can send a greater payload to ISS, Dragon seems to already be volume limited so that greater payload cannot be utilised, are there any plans to change Dragon configuration to increase usable payload to ISS?


Online Robotbeat

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Another question: Has Raptor's thrust changed since the IAC2016 announcement and if so what is the new thrust rating of it?
Yes and no. They're apparently still using the same subscale Raptor they showed at the IAC, but the specs of that were never released.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

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