Author Topic: Opinions on M.S. in Space Studies from UND Aerospace (ONLINE)  (Read 5504 times)

Offline Akclark

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Does anyone have any opinions on the M.S. in Space Studies from UND Aerospace, positive or negative?

Has anyone worked with any graduates? How do they seem as far a knowledge/trainability?

Thanks,
Aaron K. Clark

Offline JasonAW3

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Does anyone have any opinions on the M.S. in Space Studies from UND Aerospace, positive or negative?

Has anyone worked with any graduates? How do they seem as far a knowledge/trainability?

Thanks,
Aaron K. Clark

Found this website;

http://www.undsucks.com/und-aerospace.php

You might try a bit of Google-fu to do a bit more research.
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I think there may be a call for a dedicated forum section on this sort of space studies/education questions. We don't have a lot of threads, but it's an important area of relevance.

I'll have a think.

Offline Akclark

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Does anyone have any opinions on the M.S. in Space Studies from UND Aerospace, positive or negative?

Has anyone worked with any graduates? How do they seem as far a knowledge/trainability?

Thanks,
Aaron K. Clark

Found this website;

http://www.undsucks.com/und-aerospace.php

You might try a bit of Google-fu to do a bit more research.

I appreciate the feedback, but this is more for their aviation side of the house. I am looking at their Space Studies Program with a minor in Space Systems Engineering.

Offline Akclark

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I think there may be a call for a dedicated forum section on this sort of space studies/education questions. We don't have a lot of threads, but it's an important area of relevance.

I'll have a think.

That would be awesome. As a recent graduate I am excited to hear about educational opportunities that can eventually get me back into the space services field.

Offline Chilly

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Embry-Riddle offers a similar program but I couldn't get past the expense vs. expected payoff. Color me skeptical.

In the airline world I've encountered many eager young graduates of university "aviation studies" or "aeronautical science" programs. From what I've seen they aren't getting much value for their money and many even graduate without a license in any specific discipline (which shuts them out of the most critical jobs). Most of the jobs this leaves available to them don't require a specialized "aviation" degree (if any).

IMO they'd be better off just getting their A&P, Aircraft Dispatcher, or Commercial Multi-engine license and start building experience. I suspect the aerospace field is even more discriminating, with the minimum entry standard being an engineering or other technical degree. Maybe an A&P at a bare minimum (I'm thinking vehicle technicians, etc)?

Those who can't do, write.

Offline deltaV

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I'm not an aerospace person but I'm very skeptical of the value of a "space studies" degree. I would expect an "aerospace engineering" degree to be a lot more helpful.

What's your current educational background? What sorts of jobs are you hoping to get?

Offline ED2000

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I just graduated from this progam.  It is a nothing degree, and a huge mistake.  The UND space studies program is basically a tool to generate revenue from distance students in order to fund pet projects of a few professors and even fewer actual space studies campus students.  The place is so cold and isolated, nobody in their right mind would live there, I had to make several trips up there. The faculty is  trapped in group-think, and it is obvious none of them want to be there. the online students do the most work and put in the most effort, but are basically treated like a customer at a fast food drive-through restaurant.  The advisors and professors play favorites with the few (15-20) actual campus students, and have minimal contact with distance folks.  I got straight A's, spent a ton of money, two years of my life, and got zero  advice, employment recommendations or useful training. This program was a huge disappointment for me, and even professors that I admired and liked simply refused to even address any problems or concerns I had. Take my advice and DONT DO IT.  The diploma is a generic master of science, with no specific discipline. What is worse is that the student is never told this, I was told my diploma would have a specific discipline for my field of study,  but I was lied to.  It is absolutely worthless.
« Last Edit: 06/18/2016 08:31 PM by ED2000 »

Offline QuantumG

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Sounds like every aerospace engineering degree :)
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Offline spacetraveler

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Sounds like every aerospace engineering degree :)

No, that's actually a useful degree.

Offline NealioSpace

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Look into the University of Maryland, coupled with the Space Systems Lab (I worked there as an Undergrad).
http://www.ssl.umd.edu/html/people.html

Not bad to have a couple astronauts as Alumni of a lab you can work to get real experience in Spacecraft design.


And the Director of the SSL has an amazing set of Laws he has compiled! Dave is a great guy to work for!
http://spacecraft.ssl.umd.edu/akins_laws.html

Good luck!

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