Author Topic: LIVE: Soyuz-2-1A/Fregat-M – Kanopus-V-IK and others – July 14, 2017 (06:36 UTC)  (Read 31161 times)

Offline Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 467
  • Germany (near Heidelberg)
  • Liked: 66
  • Likes Given: 104
Some of the cubesats.
pic 17 shows "Mayak"
« Last Edit: 07/14/2017 01:20 PM by Alter Sachse »

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
While we're waiting for Dove satellites to get released, Roscosmos showed us a nice photo of the rocket on the pad. The photo has been taken by Resurs-P Number 1 satellite.

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
The 48 Dove satellites should begin separation right now. Awaiting for confirmation :)

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
The Dove release sequence should have ended. Now we just wait for news, hopefully good :)

Online Artyom.

"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
Huge congrats!  That's a great leap for Soyuz and the smallsat market!

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
Roscosmos now officially confirmed mission success:

https://www.roscosmos.ru/23768/

Online Olaf

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 981
  • Germany
  • Liked: 140
  • Likes Given: 169

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12969
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 2832
  • Likes Given: 430
Congratulations to Roscosmos for the successful launch!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Oystein

  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • Launches: STS-125,127,129-133,135
    • My launch pictures
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
First signal acquired from the NorSat-2 also.
Checkout: https://www.romsenter.no/content/view/full/10119

Spacecraft retirement homes I've visited:
[x] Space shuttle Enterprise @ Dulles
[x] Space shuttle Enterprise @ Intrepid
[x] Space shuttle Discovery @ Dulles
[x] Space shuttle Atlantis @ KSC
[x] Space shuttle Endeavour @ LA
[x] All Apollo capsules
[x] All Gemini capsules
[ ] All Mercury capsules

Offline pargoo

  • Lifelong space fan
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 635
  • Australia
    • Buran - wait, the Russians had a Space Shuttle?
  • Liked: 46
  • Likes Given: 0
A couple of nice launch shots. Fingers crossed we get truly hi-res images later.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
The small satellites 'TechnoSat' and 'Flying Laptop' are successfully launched into space
 
14 July 2017


On 14 July 2017At 08:36 CEST, the two research satellites 'Flying Laptop' and 'TechnoSat' were successfully launched to space on board a Russian Soyuz rocket from Baikonur Cosmodrome. The development, construction and launch of TechnoSat and the launch of Flying Laptop were financed by the Space Administration at the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fόr Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) with funds from the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. As well as testing new technologies under space conditions, the small satellites are also educational training missions – doctoral students developed, constructed and qualified the satellites for their flight to space and undergraduate students supported this process with their dissertations. "For us, practical training for young engineers is an important aspect of these small satellite missions. Another is the chance to test technologies. Many manufacturers, including small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), would like to test their aerospace technology and components for future satellites directly in orbit under space conditions. But up to now, such missions have been very costly. Small satellites could turn things around in this respect," stresses Christian Nitzschke, programme manager at the Department of Technology for Aerospace Systems and Robotics in the DLR Space Administration, who is responsible for the missions.

The ‘TechnoSat’ nanosatellite will test seven experiments

"Before new technical components are used in future space missions, they must be tested in orbit. Thanks to their limited size and weight and the use of advanced components from the areas of information and communications technology and the automotive industry, nanosatellites can make space missions more efficient," explains project manager Merlin Barschke from the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin). Seven experimental payloads are installed on the octagonal TechnoSat nanosatellite (which weighs in at approximately 20 kilograms), whose function and performance will be tested in orbit.

Orienting the satellites and determining their position

Also on board is an innovative concept developed by TU Berlin for orienting satellites – the Fluid-Dynamic Actuator. Instead of an electric motor, an electromagnetic pump is used, which channels a liquid metal through a circular canal, allowing the satellite to be quickly and precisely oriented. Conventional, electric motor-driven reaction wheels developed by TU Berlin are also being tested in parallel. In addition, the STELLA star tracker developed by the University of Wόrzburg must also demonstrate its functional capability by determining the position of the satellite based on the position of the brightest stars.

The team will also test the HISPICO S-Band Transmitter, a joint project of TU Berlin and IQ wireless GmbH. It is designed to transmit higher data volumes from orbit to the ground station than current radio connections allow. For this purpose, the TechnoSat camera will take photographs, which will be sent via the S-Band Transmitter to Earth and will also be used for public relations work. The laser retroreflectors, developed jointly by the TU Berlin, the Helmholtz Centre in Potsdam and the Austrian Academy of Sciences, will measure the satellite orbit with precision. To do this, a laser beam will be directed from the ground station to the satellite, and the time that elapses until the beam is reflected back to Earth will be measured. This experiment is intended to show that small, lower-cost, commercial reflectors can be used for this application. The SOLID (Solar panel based Impact Detector) in-situ sensor developed at the DLR Institute of Space Systems will also be tested in orbit. In future, SOLID will record the prevalence of space debris and micrometeorites in space and improve existing simulation models.

Flying Laptop – a small satellite as a training and test mission

"The 'Flying Laptop' project offers both undergraduate and doctoral students a fantastic opportunity to put learned theory into practice and gain project experience in a real space mission. So far, more than 150 student dissertations and over 20 doctoral papers have been written in connection with this project," reports Sabine Klinkner, project manager at the University of Stuttgart. The 110-kilogram ‘Flying Laptop’ small satellite was developed and constructed by post-graduate and undergraduate students at the university's Institute of Space Systems. The necessary infrastructure for the construction, qualification and operation of small satellites in general was also created as part of the development of the satellite. In addition to a large clean room for the integration of satellites, an optics laboratory and a thermal-vacuum chamber, the ground station with a control segment at the University of Stuttgart was also set up and a satellite simulation environment was developed.

Testing innovative technologies in space

The satellite platform itself forms the main component of the technology testing in space. It has a system for high-precision attitude control and three solar panels that generate approximately 270 watts. A series of innovative systems that will also be tested in orbit are also on board. These include an innovative unfolding mechanism for the solar panels, a new type of on-board computer system and the OSIRIS data transmission system, which will demonstrate high data transmission speeds via an infrared laser link. In cooperation with the company TESAT, a payload data communications system in the S-band frequency range has been developed. An innovative operating and security concept has also been developed in cooperation with Airbus Defence and Space in Friedrichshafen.

Furthermore, for the mission objective of Earth observation an innovative, multi-spectral  camera system will observe the Earth from different angles. With these images, the vegetation will be examined to, for example, study the dissemination of introduced plant species. In addition, with the aid of Automatic Identification System (AIS) receivers provided by the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen, it will also be possible to received signals from ships. The combination with the photographs taken by the satellite is new, as the real position of the ships can now be compared with the signals received. Furthermore, in cooperation with the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the star trackers built into the satellite will be used to look for so-called near-Earth objects (NEOs). Asteroids within Earth’s orbit that are barely visible from the ground will be detected.

To conclude the Flying Laptop mission, a de-orbit mechanism will ensure that the satellite burns up in the atmosphere within the 25-year time limit imposed by the United Nations to avoid the formation of additional space debris.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16670
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
HR from photo posted earlier

Offline Req

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 363
  • Liked: 291
  • Likes Given: 2572
I'm pretty sure I just saw Mayak fly over the Portland, Oregon metro area.  To my eye it wasn't quite as bright as Jupiter, but it was almost impossible to miss due to it's rapid movement(I wasn't even looking for it).  Anybody know if it was actually there, or did I see something else?

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
Here's information on Heavens above about Mayak's visible passes:

http://www.heavens-above.com/PassSummary.aspx?satid=42830&lat=55.7024&lng=37.6611&loc=Unspecified&alt=132&tz=RFTm3

I'd also suggest you to follow VKontakte's page - this social network is more popular than Facebook in Russia and that's why there are more commenters (Apparently the site is blocked here somewhay)

People on Astronomy.ru forum report different information about Mayak. Concerning yesterday's passes:

Alexander Repnoy reports he has seen KANOPUS-V-IK NORAD #42825 for about two minutes with a binocular. The satellite was hard to see. As for Mayak, he wasn't able to see anything.

The user 1212Lupus also reports he couldn't see Mayak. He reminds us that Mayak has no radio link with the Earth to inform us if the commands were executed successfully and the mirror has been deployed. If the mirror deploys, people would be able to see it and the orbit would change rapidly compared to the orbits of other satellites.
« Last Edit: 07/17/2017 03:41 PM by Svetoslav »

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
Two people on Astronomy.ru forum: Alexrama and Troublefinder tried to see Mayak with a naked eye during a planned pass over Moscow.

Nothing was seen.

Someone on VKontakte named Andrey Kirsenko said however he has noticed two bright flashes and he things it could have been Mayak.
« Last Edit: 07/17/2017 08:57 PM by Svetoslav »

Online Svetoslav

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 918
  • Bulgaria
  • Liked: 312
  • Likes Given: 42
Morning! It looks that last night Alexander Repnoy from the Russan Astronomy.ru forum has at long last seen Mayak. A very rough translation:

At 0057 Kiev time UT + 3 I first noticed KANOPUS-V-IK in theatrical binoculars in the Small Bear next to the North Star. At that moment his glitter was about 6-7m. As it went through the constellation of the Dragon, on the approach to Lira (Vega), its brightness began to increase steadily. Next to Lira at 0058 it gained brightness to about 3-4m, then the brightness began to decrease smoothly before entering the shadow of the Earth. There were no bright flashes. The height of its span in my area was 76 ° above the western horizon. After that, already at 0059 all the same in Small bear next to the Polar Star I saw Mayak (NORAD # 42830). Yes-yes, it was it, because the exact trajectory and time converged with the calculated ones. At that moment, its brightness was also at the level of 6-7m, that is, very weak. But when it went in Draco constellation, it quickly, but gradually gained brightness to about 3m, then quickly reduced the brightness to a minimum and I did not see it even with binoculars. But when it was in Draco's head I noticed its sharp glare with brightness of about 0-1m, white color and duration not more than one second. Subsequently I was not able to see it even in binoculars, in Lira near Vega. I did not see other objects from this series. Today, I'll sign up for Satobs org (seesat). I'll tell you so. The calculated brightness of the Mayak stated by Heavens-Above is not true, at least for now. There are also no bright flashes every second. Yes, it is quite possible that somewhere at some point on Earth it may be flashing up to -10m or even brighter than the Moon, but not with us. It's not even the brighness of Venus, so far is not impressive. Although it's still interesting to watch it! I will continue to look.

Another user, Mevo, also reports seeing Mayak next to Simferopol.
« Last Edit: 07/18/2017 06:40 AM by Svetoslav »

Offline eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4738
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Virginia
  • Liked: 426
  • Likes Given: 342
Wasn't Mayak expected to keep a 3-axis-oriented attitude for around 4 weeks before it was intentionally placed into a tumble? If so, this latter regime would provide frequent flash opportunities, but while it keeps a fixed orientation, large magnitude passes would be quite rare.
-DaviD-

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Online Ronsmytheiii

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22325
  • Liked: 603
  • Likes Given: 244
Video as seen from a Planet Dove Satellite!



"Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." - Robert Goddard

Tags: