Author Topic: GSLV-Mk III - General Discussion  (Read 47343 times)

Offline abhishek

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #20 on: 02/19/2015 03:07 AM »
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The next flight of GSLV Mark III, currently scheduled for December 2016, is to go the full distance and put a four-tonne satellite into geostationary orbit. The first two stages of the vehicle are ready, but the upper stage has to wait for the cryogenic stage that is now being developed at the Liquid Propulsions Systems Centre near Thiruvananthapuram.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/46294413.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
10, 9, ignition sequence start 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0, all engines running Lift off, we have a lift off, lift off

Offline vyoma

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #21 on: 03/15/2015 03:07 AM »
http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/tamil_nadu/Hot-Test-of-Cryogenic-Engine-Successful-Says-ISRO/2015/03/15/article2714243.ece

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IPRC Director D. Karthikesan said as part of an important milestone in developing a heavy lift launch vehicle, GSLV MK-3, for the next generation, a major milestone was achieved when the cryogenic CE-20 engine was hot tested.

It was successfully tested for 20 seconds at ISRO Propulsion Complex(IPRC), Mahendragiri on Saturday.

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Various subsystems of CE-20, such as injector, thrust chamber, gas generator, LOX and LH2 turbo pumps were tested earlier at IPRC, Mahendragiri.

Offline jithinnam

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #22 on: 04/02/2015 01:41 AM »
LVM3-SC rocket powered by the SCE-200 Semi-Cryo Engine

The SCE-200 is a liquid-fuel rocket engine being developed by the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre, a subsidiary of ISRO. It is being developed to power the future heavy-lift Unified Launch Vehicle (ULV) and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) being planned by ISRO but before that it will be tested with GSLV Mk III by replacing L110(powered by old Vikas engine) stage to SC160.

Here is how this version of GSLV-3 would look like. All specifications are based on available valid data.

Offline chota

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #23 on: 04/28/2015 05:25 PM »
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The engine tested today will enable us to put satellites of up to 4 tons in geostationary orbit. A proud accomplishment.@narendramodi
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Congratulations to our space scientists for the successful testing of our indigenous cryogenic engine. @narendramodi

Online sanman

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #24 on: 04/29/2015 12:18 AM »
Link to article on 645-second test for CE-20:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Isros-desi-cryogenic-engine-test-successful/articleshow/47090046.cms

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In a silent operation at the Mahendragiri test facility, Isro successfully test-fired the indigenous cryogenic engine CE-20 for 645 seconds. This marks a milestone in the country's effort to develop a big cryogenic engine to fly the ambitious GSLV-Mark III by the end of 2016.
« Last Edit: 04/29/2015 12:20 AM by sanman »

Offline Ohsin

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #25 on: 05/02/2015 03:44 PM »
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A major milestone in the development of ISRO’s next generation launch vehicle, GSLV MkIII, was achieved on successful long duration hot test (635 seconds) of high thrust cryogenic engine (CE20) on 28-04-2015 at ISRO Propulsion Complex, Mahendragiri, Tamil Nadu. The CE20 cryogenic engine is being indigenously developed by ISRO to power the cryogenic stage of GSLV MkIII launch vehicle.
The completion of successful long duration hot test has once again proved ISRO’s capability in mastering the complex cryogenic technology. All subsystems of this engine such as Thrust Chamber, Injector, Gas Generator, LOX & LH2 Turbopumps, Control Components, Pyro systems etc., and the ground Test Facility systems performed very well and the parameters are well within the prediction.
A series of development tests on this engine are being carried out to validate the performance and to prove the design of the engine. Two cold start tests and four short duration hot tests were already carried out on this engine at IPRC, Mahendragiri.

http://isro.gov.in/successful-testing-of-high-thrust-cryogenic-engine

"Well, three cheers to Sharma, but our real baby is INSAT."

Offline antriksh

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Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Online sanman

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #27 on: 05/05/2015 04:39 PM »
I think this is the CE20 test itself:




Can't really see much in there - at 37secs into the video, the clock jumps to near the end of the test.

Offline Ohsin

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #28 on: 05/07/2015 08:49 AM »
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High Thrust Cryogenic Engine (CE20) Development

ISRO is developing a high thrust cryogenic engine to be used for the upper stage of its heavy lift launch vehicle GSLV Mk-III. This high thrust cryogenic engine produces a nominal thrust of 196.5 kN in vacuum with a specific impulse of 434 seconds. The engine works on “Gas Generator Cycle” which has flexibility for independent development of each sub-system before the integrated engine test, thus minimising uncertainty in the final developmental phase and reducing development time. This engine generates nearly 2 MW power as compared to 1 MW generated by the engine of Cryogenic Upper Stage (CUS) engine of GSLV. The high thrust cryogenic engine is one of the most powerful cryogenic engines of upper stages in the world.

ISRO has achieved a major milestone by successfully conducting the ground test of Indigenous High Thrust Cryogenic Engine at ISRO Propulsion Complex at Mahendragiri on April 28, 2015 at 1657 Hrs for a duration of 635 seconds.  All the propulsion parameters during the tests were found satisfactory and closely matched with predictions. This ground test was preceded in the last few weeks, by four short duration tests of 5.5, 7.5, 20 and 30 seconds.

The high thrust cryogenic engine is designed and realised by Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) at Valiamala with the support of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) at Thiruvananthapuram. The engine assembly, integration and testing is carried out by ISRO Propulsion Complex (IPRC) at Mahendragiri. Indian Industries have significantly contributed in the realization of the cryogenic engine.

While ground tests conducted so far validate this the design adequacy and performance of the integrated engine, further demonstration tests are planned at engine and stage level to characterise the different performance parameters under various operating conditions. After completion of the tests, the indigenous high thrust cryogenic engine and stage are planned to be flight tested in GSLV Mk- III-D1 mission.

http://www.isro.gov.in/launchers/high-thrust-cryogenic-engine-ce20-development
"Well, three cheers to Sharma, but our real baby is INSAT."

Offline antriksh

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #29 on: 05/08/2015 10:54 AM »
A Heavy lift Launch Vehicle

capable of placing up to 10 ton class of spacecrafts into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit is currently under study by a project team. This new generation launch vehicle will derive its propulsion modules from LVM3 as well as from new developments, which include :

1) semi cryogenic booster stage, SC200
2) larger solid strap on boosters as compared to S200 strap on motors used in LVM3 (S250) and
3) a larger cryogenic upper stage (C50).

The Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle will have an optimal and robust design incorporating the latest technologies.
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline johnxx9

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #30 on: 05/08/2015 04:30 PM »
A Heavy lift Launch Vehicle

capable of placing up to 10 ton class of spacecrafts into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit is currently under study by a project team. This new generation launch vehicle will derive its propulsion modules from LVM3 as well as from new developments, which include :

1) semi cryogenic booster stage, SC200
2) larger solid strap on boosters as compared to S200 strap on motors used in LVM3 (S250) and
3) a larger cryogenic upper stage (C50).

The Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle will have an optimal and robust design incorporating the latest technologies.

Awesome find!

But the question is anyways this core isn't the same as the ULV CLC (160 tonnes of prop), then ISRO should have attempted putting 2 SC200 engines on this core.

Still believe, using CLCs as boosters is the right way to go (similar to Angara) for ISRO heavy lift vehicle, as it'll have commonality with rest of ULV family hence reducing costs and complexity. 

Offline antriksh

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #31 on: 05/09/2015 06:25 AM »

Awesome find!

But the question is anyways this core isn't the same as the ULV CLC (160 tonnes of prop), then ISRO should have attempted putting 2 SC200 engines on this core.

Still believe, using CLCs as boosters is the right way to go (similar to Angara) for ISRO heavy lift vehicle, as it'll have commonality with rest of ULV family hence reducing costs and complexity.

IMHO, CLCs as boosters is always an option provided there is a requirement. For CLC diameter, my guess is it would be same as that of heat shield, 5m.
« Last Edit: 05/09/2015 06:35 AM by antriksh »
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline antriksh

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #32 on: 05/09/2015 06:26 AM »
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline baldusi

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #33 on: 05/09/2015 06:35 PM »
A Heavy lift Launch Vehicle

capable of placing up to 10 ton class of spacecrafts into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit is currently under study by a project team. This new generation launch vehicle will derive its propulsion modules from LVM3 as well as from new developments, which include :

1) semi cryogenic booster stage, SC200
2) larger solid strap on boosters as compared to S200 strap on motors used in LVM3 (S250) and
3) a larger cryogenic upper stage (C50).

The Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle will have an optimal and robust design incorporating the latest technologies.
Antisksh, where did you got that info? I don't see the programmatic requirement for such a beast in the future, and it sort of goes against the ULV concept, while ignoring any reusability chances. Is ISRO planning on doing 6+ tonne GTO birds? Or are they needing 20tonnes to LEO?

Online sanman

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #34 on: 05/09/2015 07:54 PM »
Sometimes I wish ISRO could somehow switch to a more iterative program, to keep incrementally advancing things with each successive launch, rather than flying the same thing for 20+ years like with PSLV. I think some ISRO people should at least look at how to design such a roadmap, even if only just as a thought exercise. The iterative way seems a lot faster and more efficient.
« Last Edit: 05/09/2015 07:58 PM by sanman »

Offline Ohsin

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #35 on: 05/09/2015 09:04 PM »
A Heavy lift Launch Vehicle

capable of placing up to 10 ton class of spacecrafts into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit is currently under study by a project team. This new generation launch vehicle will derive its propulsion modules from LVM3 as well as from new developments, which include :

1) semi cryogenic booster stage, SC200
2) larger solid strap on boosters as compared to S200 strap on motors used in LVM3 (S250) and
3) a larger cryogenic upper stage (C50).

The Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle will have an optimal and robust design incorporating the latest technologies.
Antisksh, where did you got that info? I don't see the programmatic requirement for such a beast in the future, and it sort of goes against the ULV concept, while ignoring any reusability chances. Is ISRO planning on doing 6+ tonne GTO birds? Or are they needing 20tonnes to LEO?

I think this might be the source.

http://isrohq.vssc.gov.in/VSSC_V4/index.php/technology/heavy-lift-launch-vehicles

Notice the image URL of render "HLV-S250-SC200-C50.JPG"

 ;)
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Offline Damon Hill

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #36 on: 05/09/2015 09:23 PM »
Changing the design with each launch is slow, risky, and extremely expensive.   A launch system progresses with need, and usually the need is for a reliable system, which the PSLV has been in contrast with the GSLV. 

If you were hoping for an extremely heavy launch system to somehow evolve, three such systems were historically built (Saturn V, N-1, and Energia), flown for a limited period, and abandoned.

The GSLV Mk III appears to be a basis for a launch system that meets need both present and for the next decade or so with some room for improvement and growth.  When the need exists for very heavy lift, a new launch system will have to be built.  The notion that 'build it and the payloads will appear', hasn't worked very well to date.

Maybe SpaceX will buck that trend by significantly lowering launch costs, but that isn't the whole story.

Online sanman

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #37 on: 05/09/2015 11:00 PM »
Well, then it makes me wonder what the purpose of this proposed HLV would be. Would something that could place 10 tons into LEO be meant for lofting space station modules? Otherwise, how many satellites are above 10 tons? I thought GSAT-10 was the heaviest to date, at 3.5 tons.

Maybe it's just another powerpoint rocket.

Online hop

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #38 on: 05/10/2015 12:33 AM »
Well, then it makes me wonder what the purpose of this proposed HLV would be. Would something that could place 10 tons into LEO be meant for lofting space station modules? Otherwise, how many satellites are above 10 tons?
Note according to the image posted, that's 10 tons to GTO, similar to Ariane 5. LEO payload would presumably be closer to 20 tons. It's not clear what need India would have for an LV in this class. It could be used for dual manifest GTO launches, but Arianespace at least seem to have concluded dual launch isn't a win. 20 tons to LEO would be about right for a space station modules, but it seems unlikely that ISRO will be building their own station any time soon.
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Maybe it's just another powerpoint rocket.
Very likely. Everyone who builds rockets dreams of BFRs, it's quite normal to do preliminary studies and pitch them to anyone who will listen.

Offline antriksh

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Re: LVM3 - General Discussion
« Reply #39 on: 05/10/2015 04:32 AM »

Antisksh, where did you got that info? I don't see the programmatic requirement for such a beast in the future, and it sort of goes against the ULV concept, while ignoring any reusability chances. Is ISRO planning on doing 6+ tonne GTO birds? Or are they needing 20tonnes to LEO?

HLV to me is a recent development (2014 onwards). the attached article in this post http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=36389.msg1371968#msg1371968 mentions that ISRO is conducting studies on HLV.

The source of HLV imgae is http://www.vssc.gov.in/VSSC_V4/index.php/technology/heavy-lift-launch-vehicles.

About 10 ton satellites, in the words of DR K Sivan :

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He said, the next focus after the Mars mission was towards exploration of the solar system and deep space astronomy. As new applications are  being developed, the size of satellites had to be increased and ISRO was planning to develop 10 tons satellites soon.

Source
« Last Edit: 05/10/2015 04:34 AM by antriksh »
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Tags: GSLV Mk3 LVM3