Author Topic: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES  (Read 60945 times)

Online Chris Bergin

These wonderful engines are living on, and as such we should have an update thread as they head into test firings, etc.

Articles on this path:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/tag/ssme/ <---pretty much a few years of recent history on the path to testing on that one page.

E0525 is now installed on the A-1 Test Stand. So we're getting close.
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2014/07/rs-25-stennis-testing-sls-schedule/

====

L2 SSME is a really great section of content, from SSME bibles, to SSME FRR, MMT, PRCB, to their role with SLS, videos and all sort - really love that L2 subsection (and it's a big one!):
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=tags;tagid=1409

Offline Hog

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #1 on: 08/25/2014 02:19 PM »
Mighty RS25 #0525 takes her place on the A-1 test stand and prepares to flex her bells and "make it rain" once again at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. #0525 has been and will be the engine that does the grunt work on the stand, so that her "sisters in thrust" can fly with grace.

  Eventual 109% RPT testing will stress the test stands in the future.
"Modifications to the engines, like higher thrust levels, were needed on the proven workhorse to prepare them for the SLS. To accommodate a higher thrust level, the number of engines was increased from three, used during the shuttle era, to four. The power level also was increased for each engine.

Engines on the shuttle ran at 491,000 pounds vacuum thrust (104.5-percent of rated power level). After analyzing temperature and other factors on the engine, the power level was increased for SLS to 512,000 pounds vacuum thrust (109 percent of rated power level)."


Quote and photo credit:NASA
Paul

Offline newpylong

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Offline AnalogMan

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #3 on: 12/13/2014 01:31 AM »
New "Brain" for RS-25 Engine is No Technological Flashback to the '80s
Megan Davidson MSFC - December 10, 2014

Take a look at your current devices. Can you imagine swapping that smartphone for a gigantic cellphone from the 1980s? Surfing the Internet with dial-up speed? Working out to your favorite music with a cassette player?

Today's technology is better, faster and more innovative. People have to keep up with the rapidly changing times, and so does the "brain" for the RS-25 rocket engine.

The engine controller unit on the RS-25 -- formerly known as the space shuttle main engine -- helped propel all of the space shuttle missions to space. It allows communication between the vehicle and the engine, relaying commands to the engine and transmitting data back to the vehicle. The controller also provides closed-loop management of the engine by regulating the thrust and fuel mixture ratio while monitoring the engine's health and status.

Just like the ever-evolving computer, the engine controller unit needed a "refresh" to provide the capability necessary for four RS-25 engines to power the core stage of NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), to deep space missions. The core stage, towering more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, will store cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25 engines.

"You can't put yesterday's hardware on today's engine, especially since many parts of the shuttle-era engine controller unit aren't even made anymore," said Russ Abrams, avionics subsystem manager in the SLS Liquid Engines Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Marshall manages the SLS Program for the agency. "We need the most updated control systems for this engine to meet SLS specifications and take us to places we've never been before in space."

Controller development is based heavily on the recent development experience with the J-2X engine controller. An engineering model RS-25 controller is being tweaked and tested at Marshall. At one of the center's test facilities, engineers are simulating the RS-25 in flight, using real engine actuators, sensors, connectors and harnesses.

A second engineering model controller and RS-25 engine also recently were installed on the A-1 test stand at NASA's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Pending final preparation and activation work, the engine test series is anticipated to begin in 2015.

"NASA and its partners have been working very hard to evolve this crucial piece of hardware and software for the RS-25, and we look forward to seeing it tested on the A-1 stand very soon," said Johnny Heflin, deputy manager of the SLS Liquid Engines Office at Marshall. "This is an exciting time for everyone involved with this project."

The RS-25 and controller work are a collaborative effort between NASA and prime contractor Aerojet Rocketdyne of Sacramento, California.

The first flight test of the SLS will be configured for a 70-metric-ton (77-ton) lift capacity and carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit to test the performance of the integrated system. As the SLS evolves, it will be the most powerful rocket ever built and provide an unprecedented lift capability of 130 metric tons (143 tons) to enable missions even farther into our solar system.

http://www.nasa.gov/sls/brain-for-rs-25-engine.html

Photo Caption: The engine controller unit allows communication between the vehicle and the engine, relaying commands to the engine and transmitting data back to the vehicle. Engineering model controllers are being tested at the Marshall Center and Stennis Space Center. Image Credit: NASA/MSFC
« Last Edit: 12/13/2014 01:32 AM by AnalogMan »

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #4 on: 12/17/2014 10:26 PM »
Chill Test, Warm Success

NASA engineers at Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., took a major step Dec. 11 towards hotfire testing of RS-25 rocket engines that will help power the new Space Launch System (SLS) on mis­sions to deep-space destinations. A-1 Test Stand operators at Stennis completed a chill test of developmental engine No. 0525, clearing the way for hotfire testing to begin in 2015.

A chill test is a full-dress rehearsal for hotfire testing. During the test super-cold rocket propellants are flowed through stand and engine piping to ensure there are no problems with delivery. RS-25 engines are fueled by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, which flow at temperatures reaching less than -400 degrees Fahrenheit. During the chill test, engineers monitor such things as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates of the propellants. They also seek to verify the steps of the chill procedure and accurately gauge the amount of time needed to chill the pumps and engine for hotfire tests. Such data is studied to make any needed adjustments and to prepare the hotfire test sequence and requirements.  A similar test was conducted earlier in the year without an engine installed. Liquid nitrogen was flowed through newly installed piping as a preliminary test of its design.

Modification of the A-1 Test Stand for RS-25 testing has been under way for more than a year. Various stand components and configurations had to be changed to enable RS-25 testing. RS-25 engines are remaining space shuttle main engines, which have been modified for the SLS vehicle. A configuration of four RS-25 engines will power the SLS core stage. In addition to conducting development and acceptance testing of individual RS-25 engines on the A-1 stand, NASA engineers are making preparations to test the SLS core stage configuration with four RS-25 engines on the B-2 Test Stand at Stennis.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/chill-test-warm-success

Offline psloss

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #5 on: 12/20/2014 01:35 AM »
Aerojet Rocketdyne posted some b-roll of that today on YouTube:




Online robertross

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #7 on: 01/09/2015 03:06 PM »
Test Fire today!
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2015/01/stennis-rs-25-return-sls-engine-firing/

Nice article Chris.

And finally out in the open:
"Several additional engines have also been ordered from Aerojet Rocketdyne by NASA, known solely as the RS-25 (as opposed being called the RS-25E), which are cheaper, expendable versions of the engine. Further information on those engines will be revealed at the conclusion of the procurement process."
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #8 on: 01/09/2015 07:59 PM »
SLS Core Stage Engine: In It for the Long Haul
January 9, 2015

[...]

NASA plans to restart RS-25 production to provide engines for future flights by working with Aerojet Rocketdyne to further adapt and modify the engine design to be more affordable, while increasing the planned thrust to 521,700 pounds.

"We had identified significant cost and time saving ideas for the RS-25 before the shuttle program ended," Wofford said. "We see many opportunities for process and manufacturing savings with the change to an expendable engine and the maturation of technologies, such as 3D printing and structured light scanning."

Initial production will be for six new engines and more beyond that once NASA gains experience with the design and manufacturing changes. With that, the RS-25 is expected to be exploring space for many more decades and building on its space shuttle legacy.

http://www.nasa.gov/sls/core-stage-engine.html

Edit to add:

And just for the record the pre-solicitation notice for the purchase of six additional RS-25 engines can be found here (issued Sep 24, 2014):

https://www.fbo.gov/spg/NASA/GMSFC/POVA/NNM06AB13C/listing.html
« Last Edit: 01/09/2015 08:14 PM by AnalogMan »

Offline DDG40

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #9 on: 01/09/2015 10:51 PM »
Just started the test at 5:42 CST.  So good to hear that sound again. I am located 7 miles from the test stand.  shut down at 5:51 sounds like it went well.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #10 on: 01/09/2015 11:17 PM »
Thanks! Updated the article.


Offline catdlr

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #12 on: 01/10/2015 02:39 AM »
SLS RS-25 Testing Heats Up

Published on Jan 9, 2015

The RS-25 engine that will drive NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System, to deep space blazed through its first successful test Jan. 9 at the agency's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The RS-25 fired up for 500 seconds on the A-1 test stand, providing NASA engineers with critical data on the engine controller unit and inlet pressure conditions

Tony De La Rosa

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #13 on: 01/10/2015 10:06 AM »
From the link newpylong posted:

RS-25 Engine Testing Blazes Forward for NASA's Space Launch System
RELEASE 15-007 January 9, 2015

[...]

"We’ve made modifications to the RS-25 to meet SLS specifications and will analyze and test a variety of conditions during the hot fire series,” said Steve Wofford, manager of the SLS Liquid Engines Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where the SLS Program is managed. "The engines for SLS will encounter colder liquid oxygen temperatures than shuttle; greater inlet pressure due to the taller core stage liquid oxygen tank and higher vehicle acceleration; and more nozzle heating due to the four-engine configuration and their position in-plane with the SLS booster exhaust nozzles.”

The engine controller unit, the "brain" of the engine, allows communication between the vehicle and the engine, relaying commands to the engine and transmitting data back to the vehicle. The controller also provides closed-loop management of the engine by regulating the thrust and fuel mixture ratio while monitoring the engine's health and status. The new controller will use updated hardware and software configured to operate with the new SLS avionics architecture.

"This first hot-fire test of the RS-25 engine represents a significant effort on behalf of Stennis Space Center’s A-1 test team," said Ronald Rigney, RS-25 project manager at Stennis. "Our technicians and engineers have been working diligently to design, modify and activate an extremely complex and capable facility in support of RS-25 engine testing."

Testing will resume in April after upgrades are completed on the high pressure industrial water system, which provides cool water for the test facility during a hot fire test. Eight tests, totaling 3,500 seconds, are planned for the current development engine. Another development engine later will undergo 10 tests, totaling 4,500 seconds. The second test series includes the first test of new flight controllers, known as green running.

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2015/january/rs-25-engine-testing-blazes-forward-for-nasas-space-launch-system/index.html

[my underline]

Online Chris Bergin

Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #14 on: 05/28/2015 10:50 PM »
There's a hot fire of 0525 tonight local time.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #15 on: 05/29/2015 12:25 AM »
And complete.


Offline CameronD

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #16 on: 05/29/2015 12:36 AM »
Engine assembly in two minutes:


With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #17 on: 05/29/2015 01:50 AM »
Thrown together a quick article to mark the testing, the path, new engine we previously reported and some general "I do love this engine" history:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2015/05/stennis-rs-25-full-duration-test-2/

Oh and a couple of Okan renders from L2 SLS ;D

Online Chris Bergin

Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #18 on: 06/11/2015 07:24 PM »
Boom! Test 3 just occurred for E0525!

Offline PahTo

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Re: RS-25 testing at Stennis for SLS - UPDATES
« Reply #19 on: 06/11/2015 08:14 PM »

I hope the "Boom!" part is just a colloquial and not indicative of any event during said test...
;)

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