Author Topic: 3D Printer uses Space Related  (Read 178379 times)

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #700 on: 12/26/2016 09:41 AM »
Anti-Corrosion Intercept Technology Now Available in 3D Printable Form
https://3dprint.com/159174/intercept-technology-3d-printable/

"The new development means that complex parts and shapes can be 3D printed to protect onboard electronics, as well as other components that require strong corrosion and/or ESD (electrostatic discharge) protection. The non-volatile nature of the technology allows it to be used in high-end, clean applications; right now, spools are available for corrosion protection in a PLA base or corrosion plus permanent ESD protection in an ABS polymer base.


EMI’s claim to fame is Intercept Technology, licensed from original developer Alcatel Lucent Bell Labs. The technology was actually created originally to repair corrosion on the Statue of Liberty and then further modified to provide protection for packaged goods. A reactive polymer barrier neutralizes corrosive gases before they reach the material inside the packaging, allowing safe transport through any conditions by land, air or sea."


2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #701 on: 12/26/2016 09:57 AM »
Aurora Labs Ships First 3D Printer in the S-Titanium Line, is Top IPO on ASX
https://3dprint.com/159742/aurora-labs-ships-first-3d-printer/

One of the first companies to develop an affordable metal 3D printer was Aurora Labs, which launched a Kickstarter campaign two years ago for a metal 3D printer priced below $4,000 – an unheard-of cost. *Unfortunately, due to an intellectual property dispute with Kickstarter, the project ultimately fell through, but it had already raised more than three times its funding goal at the time of cancellation.

At that point, Aurora Labs moved on to the development of a large-scale metal printer that they claimed would be over 100 times faster than other machines on the market. The printer drew the interest of several large companies, as well as NASA, before its production was even completed, and now the Perth, Australia-based company has announced that they have shipped the first printer in their S-Titanium line, which includes the S-Titanium and S-Titanium Pro.


Each machine is also, essentially, three printers in one, capable of printing in three modes: selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), and directed energy deposition (DED). In DED mode, on-the-fly alloying and pseudo-alloying is an option thanks to three independently controllable powder hoppers."


*Full disclosure Ordered the $4000 Unit :) .  US National labs still doing the basic research at the time.
« Last Edit: 12/26/2016 09:59 AM by Prober »
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

Online AnalogMan

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #702 on: 12/29/2016 02:23 PM »
Presentation from earlier this year (June 20, 2016 - 26 slides)

NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing Initiative: Initial Results from International Space Station Technology Demonstration and Future Plans
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160007827.pdf

Mostly direct comparisons of ISS flight and ground produced 3D printed parts (structure, strength, density, etc.)

Offline Prober

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #703 on: 12/31/2016 01:33 PM »
$90/80€ (excluding VAT/taxes) add on for your $300 DIY printer

Swedish 3D Printer Distributor 3DVerkstan Launches New Olsson Ruby Nozzle Today
https://3dprint.com/160091/3dverkstan-launches-olsson-ruby/


Daniel Ljungstig, the CEO of 3DVerkstan, told 3DPrint.com, “Ruby has among others already been used in water jets, inkjets, and air nozzles because of their resistance to chemical substances, hardness, stability under high temperature and remarkable electrical and thermal properties. We are thrilled to introduce this gem into the 3D Printing world in a manner that will make the ultimate difference in high-quality printing of hard materials. The Olsson Ruby nozzle with its possibility of printing all kind of abrasive materials, will unlock new applications both in manufacturing as well as in advanced research.”


"One of the great features of the Olsson Ruby nozzle is that it works with a large range of materials, including PLA, ABS, nylon, and composites that have abrasive additives such as steel, carbon fiber, tungsten, and phosphorescent pigment. Also, thanks to the ruby mounted at the tip, the nozzle is highly wear resistant, and assures that even the toughest of materials are printable. In fact, the nozzle was originally designed to print with a composite of B4C, also known as Boron Carbide, which is the third hardest material in the world."
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

Offline bolun

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #704 on: 01/20/2017 03:52 PM »
How to build a 3D printed Astro Pi flight case (video)

This video explains how to build an Astro Pi flight case - from printing the 3D files and installing the Astro Pi hardware to  testing the buttons. The final result is a 3D printed flight case for the Astro Pi similar to the ones on the International Space Station. This video was designed for the 2016/2017 European Astro Pi Challenge.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Videos/2017/01/How_to_build_a_3D_printed_Astro_Pi_flight_case

Offline bolun

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #705 on: 05/03/2017 07:33 PM »
Printing bricks from moondust using the Sun's heat

3 May 2017

Bricks have been 3D printed out of simulated moondust using concentrated sunlight – proving in principle that future lunar colonists could one day use the same approach to build settlements on the Moon.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Printing_bricks_from_moondust_using_the_Sun_s_heat


Offline savuporo

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #706 on: 05/29/2017 05:50 PM »
Something new to me. Sounds like a ton of new applications enabled for both metal and carbon fiber


Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #707 on: 05/29/2017 07:30 PM »
Something new to me. Sounds like a ton of new applications enabled for both metal and carbon fiber


Made In Space ISS printer could be used to make metal parts, just need an oven to bake to part.


Offline savuporo

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #708 on: 05/29/2017 07:59 PM »
Made In Space ISS printer could be used to make metal parts, just need an oven to bake to part.

You mean in it's current configuration ? Right now they can only do polymers with the FDM head. AFAIK they have talked about metal casting with printed mold, but not additive manufacturing of metal itself.
The advantage of Markforgeds process is no mess with powder, as in DMLS, and sounds like they are getting much stronger parts out, too.
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline bolun

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #709 on: 06/03/2017 06:59 AM »
Printing bricks from moondust using the Sun's heat

3 May 2017

Bricks have been 3D printed out of simulated moondust using concentrated sunlight – proving in principle that future lunar colonists could one day use the same approach to build settlements on the Moon.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Printing_bricks_from_moondust_using_the_Sun_s_heat



3D Printed Building Blocks using Lunar Soil

https://gsp.esa.int/documents/10192/43064675/C22835ExS.pdf/ce5dca46-e4c9-4980-a9d3-918decd24bd0

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #710 on: 08/03/2017 09:38 PM »
This 30ft mini sub hull was printed in carbon fibre in sections over a few weeks.
This sub hull is about same size as new small LV boosters eg Electron, Vector, LauncherOne. Cost savings should be similar. With 3D printed engines as well that is bulk of LV 3D printed.

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/07/30-foot-long-proof-of-concept-3d-printed-submarine-hull-will-be-ten-times-cheaper.html/amp

Online john smith 19

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Re: 3D Printer uses Space Related
« Reply #711 on: 08/06/2017 12:45 PM »
I don't want to start a new thread but I'd like to mention a technique which seems complementary to 3D printing. Femtosecond laser processing.

Femtosecond lasers are pulse lasers that emit pulses of in the 1x10^-12 to 1x10^-15secs range at PRF's in the 200KHz-1MHz range with an intensity of 2x10^15 W cm^-2

The very short pulse length is below the time for electron/phonon interactions. That means there is substantial changes to the material but not due to heating, as the duty cycle per pulse is very low (1/1000 000 of an on/off cycle).

Originally this was used to write waveguides into transparent materials by creating a local change to the refractive index. However this also makes the exposed areas a lot easier to etch, with a differential etch rate of 300:1. The etched area can also be a volume, and it can be below the surface, creating 3D ducts which can be etched by 8M KOH, as well as the usual (and highly dangerous) HF. Materials tested include soda lime glass (window glass), Silica and Lithium Niobium Titante LiNbTiO4

It can also lower the pulse energy needed in the case of Aluminum by about a factor of 15

Immersing an object in water, and focusing the beam at a spot above the surface creates micro explosions of intense heat and shock waves that can eat through 3mm metal in precise patterns.
https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwjK14Ocz8LVAhXOZlAKHdg3DHoQFggrMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mdpi.com%2F2072-666X%2F6%2F12%2F1471%2Fpdf&usg=AFQjCNF5tqiZWu2avAd_Fvu-kPutocxzJw

This technology already exists as a COTS machine.
https://www.femtoprint.ch/

IOW it's broad spectrum, works with both conductors and non conductors, does not need a resist and can enable etching with relatively safe etches of transparent materials and machining of metals.
« Last Edit: 08/06/2017 12:45 PM by john smith 19 »
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