Author Topic: Mars EDL technologies  (Read 104553 times)

Online Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 26353
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6275
  • Likes Given: 4593
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #280 on: 10/22/2014 03:07 AM »
That's it, simple and efficient.
Good approach, but I still think a reusable lander with ISRU is better, wouldn't have to be more massive.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Dalhousie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2044
  • Liked: 248
  • Likes Given: 294
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #281 on: 10/22/2014 07:54 AM »
That's it, simple and efficient.
Good approach, but I still think a reusable lander with ISRU is better, wouldn't have to be more massive.

Massing 49 tonnes at entry it is a bit larger than a original MD module, of which there were two, so 62% of the entry mass of a MD mission.

Two things to remember: 1)this is an opposition class mission, which almost never feature ISRU and 2), it is from 1968 when ISRU was not considered for an initial mission.  Given these limits, even  with the benefit of 46 years hindsight, it's hard to improve beyond a few tweaks.


Even with a conjunction mission if you don't want to do with ISRU you may end up with something like this to land the crew in and return them at the end.





"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Online Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 26353
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 6275
  • Likes Given: 4593
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #282 on: 10/22/2014 02:49 PM »
Yeah, it's a good approach. Red Dragon-based sample-return would look basically identical but at a smaller scale.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Dalhousie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2044
  • Liked: 248
  • Likes Given: 294
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #283 on: 10/22/2014 11:21 PM »
Yeah, it's a good approach. Red Dragon-based sample-return would look basically identical but at a smaller scale.

Exactly. 
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4256
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1262
  • Likes Given: 711
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #284 on: 01/22/2015 12:11 AM »
04 NASA Talk EDL cc

Published on Jan 21, 2015

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4256
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1262
  • Likes Given: 711
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #285 on: 05/08/2015 01:36 PM »
must be some old film??  :o

NASA Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD)

Published on May 8, 2015
NASA's Wallops Flight Facility
NASA's LDSD test is designed to investigate breakthrough technologies that will benefit landing future robotic and human Mars missions, as well as aid in safely returning large payloads to Earth. The LDSD test over the Pacific Ocean simulates the supersonic entry and descent speeds a spacecraft would be exposed to when flying through the Martian atmosphere.

« Last Edit: 05/08/2015 01:39 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline FishDaddyFlex

  • Member
  • Posts: 6
  • Ludington, MI
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #286 on: 04/08/2016 03:26 AM »
Does anyone know if there are still plans for the 2016 LDSD test?  I cant find anything on it since the last test.  As I understand it, the parachute would not be able to be used even if successful unless funding was provided for another successful test (NASA needs two successful tests to deem it flight ready technology).  Maybe they have decided the parachute is just not going to be a reliable option without some sort of vastly new concepts or technologies.  I figured they would still test for the purpose of SIAD though.


EDIT:  I received some good responses to the same question in the LDSD thread:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=37724.msg1512879#msg1512879
« Last Edit: 04/13/2016 01:38 AM by FishDaddyFlex »

Offline savuporo

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4863
  • Liked: 830
  • Likes Given: 294
Re: Mars EDL technologies
« Reply #287 on: 05/03/2016 12:50 AM »
Came across interesting dissertation for a control mechanism for large hypersonic deceleators.

https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/bitstream/handle/10919/50648/Atkins_BM_D_2014.pdf
http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/1.A32970

"Mars Precision Entry Guidance Using Internal Moving Mass Actuators"


The idea is not new:
http://proceedings.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/proceeding.aspx?articleid=1588605
Quote
We describe Sherpa a S trap-on H igh-altitude E ntry R econnaissance & P recision A eromaneuver system that utilizes a moving mass system within an entry capsule to land a spacecraft precisely onto the surface of Mars.
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Tags: