Author Topic: JWST Overview  (Read 2433 times)

Offline rdale

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JWST Overview
« on: 07/24/2008 02:23 AM »
This presentation provides an overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project. The JWST is an infrared telescope designed to collect data in the cosmic dark zone. Specifically, the mission of the JWST is to study the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars and planetary systems. It is a deployable telescope with a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, adjustable primary mirror. outfitted with cryogenic temperature telescope and instruments for infrared performance. The JWST is several times more sensitive than previous telescope and other photographic and electronic detection methods. It hosts a near infrared camera, near infrared spectrometer, mid-infrared instrument and a fine guidance sensor. The JWST mission objection and architecture, integrated science payload, instrument overview, and operational orbit are described.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20080023776_2008022570.pdf

Offline rdale

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Frequently Asked Questions for Scientists and Engineers
« Reply #1 on: 01/28/2009 06:53 PM »
    JWST will be tested incrementally during its construction, starting with individual mirrors and instruments (including cameras and spectrometers) and building up to the full observatory. JWST's mirrors and the telescope structure are first each tested individually, including optical testing of the mirrors and alignment testing of the structure inside a cold thermal-vacuum chamber. The mirrors are then installed on the telescope structure in a clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In parallel to the telescope assembly and alignment, the instruments are being built and tested, again first individually, and then as part of an integrated instrument assembly. The integrated instrument assembly will be tested in a thermal-vacuum chamber at GSFC using an optical simulator of the telescope. This testing makes sure the instruments are properly aligned relative to each other and also provides an independent check of the individual tests. After both the telescope and the integrated instrument module are successfully assembled, the integrated instrument module will be installed onto the telescope, and the combined system will be sent to Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) where it will be optically tested in one of the JSC chambers. The process includes testing the 18 primary mirror segments acting as a single primary mirror, and testing the end-to-end system. The final system test will assure that the combined telescope and instruments are focused and aligned properly, and that the alignment, once in space, will be within the range of the actively controlled optics. In general, the individual optical tests of instruments and mirrors are the most accurate. The final system tests provide a cost-effective check that no major problem has occurred during assembly. In addition, independent optical checks of earlier tests will be made as the full system is assembled, providing confidence that there are no major problems.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20090003207_2008049655.pdf

Offline rdale

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James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) the First Light Machine
« Reply #2 on: 04/08/2010 03:05 PM »
Great look at progress and its purpose...

     Mission Objective: a) Study origin & evolution of galaxies, stars & planetary systems; b) Optimized for near infrared wavelength (0.6 - 28 microns); c) 5 year Mission Life (10 year Goal). Organization: a) Mission Lead: Goddard Space Flight Center; b) International collaboration with ESA & CSA; c) Prime Contractor: Northrop Grumman Space Technology Instruments: a) Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) - Univ. of Arizona; b) Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) - ESA; c) Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) - JPL/ESA; d) Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) - CSA. Operations: Space Telescope Science Institute.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20100011386_2010011552.pdf

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