Author Topic: LIVE: Chandrayaan-1 launch - First Indian mission to the Moon - October 22, 08  (Read 95893 times)

Offline s^3

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LIVE EVENT PAGES FOR LAUNCH AND MISSION.
« Last Edit: 10/22/2008 12:50 AM by Chris Bergin »

Offline s^3

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #1 on: 12/01/2007 04:11 AM »
The details of Indian and Foreign payloads on Chandrayan -1 are as follows:

A) The Indian payloads  :


Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC)
To map topography in both near and far side of the Moon and prepare a 3-dimensional atlas with high spatial and altitude resolution. The TMC will image in the panchromatic spectral region of 0.5 to 0.85 µm with a spatial/ ground resolution of 5m, 10 bit quantization and swath coverage of 20 Km.


Hyper Spectral Imager (HySI)
To obtain spectroscopic data for mineralogical mapping of the lunar surface in 32 contiguous bands in the Very Near Infra Red (VNIR) spectral range of 0.4-0.95µm region with a spectral resolution of better than 15nm and spatial resolution of 80m with swath coverage of 20Km. The data from this instrument will help in improving the available information on mineral composition of the lunar surface.

Lunar Laser Ranging Instrument (LLRI)
For determination of accurate altitude of the spacecraft above the lunar surface, determine the global topographical field of the Moon obtain an improved model for the lunar gravity field and supplement the data from terrain mapping camera and hyper-spectral imager payloads. A coherent pulse of light at 1064 nm wavelength and pulse width of 10 ns is transmitted and its echo is received back from the lunar surface.

High Energy X-ray Spectrometer (HEX)
The High-Energy X-ray spectrometer covers the hard X-ray region from about 30 keV to about 250 keV. This is the first experiment to carry out spectral studies of planetary surface at hard X-ray energies using good energy resolution detectors. The geometric detector area of 144 cm2 is realized by cascading nine Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) arrays, each 4 cm x 4 cm (5mm thick), composed of 256 (16x16) pixels (size: 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm).

Moon Impact Probe(MIP)
The impact probe weighing 29 kg will be released at a predetermined time after the orbiter reaches the final 100km orbit to impact at a pre-selected location. The dimension of the impact probe is 375 mm x 375 mm x 470 mm

There are three major payloads in the Moon Impact Probe

Radar Altimeter - for measurement of altitude of the Probe above the lunar surface. The operating frequency band is 4.3 GHz ± 100 MHz

Video Imaging System - for acquiring images of the surface of moon from the descending probe using analog CCD camera along with a video decoder

Mass Spectrometer - A state-of-the-art Quadrupole mass spectrometer with a mass resolution of 0.5 amu and sensitive to partial pressure of the order of 10-15 torr for measuring the constituents of tenuous lunar atmosphere during descent.

B) Payloads from other organizations :
Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS)
Realized through ESA with collaboration between Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK and ISRO Satellite Centre, ISRO.
Part of this payload is redesigned by ISRO to suit Chandrayaan-1 scientific objectives. The primary goal of the C1XS instrument is to carry out high quality X-ray spectroscopic mapping of the Moon, in order to constrain key questions on the origin and evolution of the Moon. C1XS would use X-ray fluorescence technique (1.0-10 keV) for measuring elemental abundance of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ti distributed over the surface of the Moon.

Near-IR Spectrometer (SIR-2)
SIR-2 is developed by the Max-Plank-Institute for Solar System Science, through the Max-Plank Society, Germany and ESA.
It collects the Sun’s light reflected by the Moon with the help of a main and secondary mirror which hits a grating. The intensity of light dispersed by the grating is measured at the differentwavelengths. The wavelength range covered by the spectrometer is 0.93-2.4 µm with spectral resolution 6nm. Used to study detail the lunar surface in various geological/mineralogical and topographical units, vertical distribution of crustal material, crater formation on the Moon, Survey mineral lunar resources etc.

Sub Kev Atom reflecting Analyser (SARA)
SARA is realized through ESA, in collaboration with Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Sweden and Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO. SARA consists of three units viz. SARA neutral atom sensor CENA (Chandrayan-1 Energetic Neutrals Analyzer), SARA solar wind monitor SWIM (Solar WInd Monitor), and SARA DPU (Digital Processing Unit).
It will image the Moon surface using low energy neutral atoms as diagnostics in the energy range 10eV-2keV. The SARA instrument is designed to detect with sufficient angular and mass resolution the atomic particles which leave the surface mostly as neutral atoms leading to studies in space weathering of Moon’s surface.

Radiation Dose Monitor Experiment ( RADOM )
RADOM Payload is from Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It is a miniature spectrometer-dosimeter containing one semiconductor detector of 0.3mm thickness, one charge-sensitive preamplifier and two micro controllers. It will qualitatively and quantitatively characterize, in terms of particle flux, dose rate and deposited energy spectrum, the radiation environment in near moon space.

Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar (MiniSAR)
MiniSAR payload is from Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and Naval Air Warfare Centre, USA through NASA. The mini-SAR system will transmit Right Circular Polarization (RCP) and receive both Left Circular Polarization (LCP) and RCP. It operates in two modes, as a scatterometer and as a radiometer.
In scatterometer mode, the system will measure the RCP and LCP response in the altimetry footprint along the nadir ground-track.
In radiometer mode, the system will measure the surface RF emissivity, allowing a determination of the near normal incidence Fresnel reflectivity.
The synthetic aperture radar system works at a frequency 2.38 GHz with a resolution of 75m per pixel and weighs 6.5kg.

MOON MINERALOGY MAPPER (M3)
Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) payload is from Brown University and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA through NASA. The M3 scientific instrument is a high throughput push broom imaging spectrometer operating in 0.7 to 3.0 µ m range. It measures solar reflected energy using a two-dimensional HgCdTe detector array. The primary Science goal of M3 is to characterize and map lunar surface mineralogy in the context of lunar geologic evolution. This will improve the understanding of the early evolution of a differentiated planetary body and also provide a high-resolution assessment of lunar resources.


Offline s^3

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #2 on: 12/10/2007 04:58 AM »
A new Deep Space Networking ( DSN ) antenna with a 32M dia main reflector and 3.2M subreflector has been installed and is under commissioning at Byalalu near Bangalore. This will be used for Chandrayaan-1. It has a capability to transmit/receive both S and X band signals from probes sent to other planets etc. It uses beam waveguide technology for transporting the signals between feed and fixed receiver on ground avoiding thereby rotory joints.

 link :       http://www.ecil.co.in/32mtrsantenna.pdf


=============
S^3

Offline eeergo

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #3 on: 01/01/2008 07:42 PM »
I think this hasn't appeared anywhere before, and frankly I'm quite surprised that a roving vehicule hasn't made any headlines until four months before launch!

http://www.hinduonnet.com/fline/stories/20080118509510900.htm

If it works, it'll be a great extra :)
-DaviD-

Online hop

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #4 on: 01/01/2008 10:46 PM »
Quote
eeergo - 1/1/2008  12:42 PM

I think this hasn't appeared anywhere before, and frankly I'm quite surprised that a roving vehicule hasn't made any headlines until four months before launch!
According to the article, the rover is on Chandrayaan-2, which is slated for 2011 or 2012.

Offline eeergo

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #5 on: 01/01/2008 10:53 PM »
You're completely right, I wasn't aware of the existence of a second probe, and I somehow skipped the '-2' part. Something else to look forward to, albeit a little farther ahead...
-DaviD-

Offline ckiki lwai

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RE: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #6 on: 01/11/2008 07:28 PM »
An article from ESA about the mission:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM6563MDAF_index_0.html

Quote from the article:
"Chandrayaan will produce maps with a resolution of between 5 and 10 m across the whole surface of the Moon. “We aim to have this in two years,” says Koschny."

That's nice:
Diameter Apollo lunar descent stage: 4.2m!
Could this be large enough for Chandrayan to spot?
If so, I'm curious how the conspiracy theorists will explain India's involvement in the complot! :bleh:
Don't ever become a pessimist... a pessimist is correct oftener than an optimist, but an optimist has more fun, and neither can stop the march of events. - Robert Heinlein

Offline s^3

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #7 on: 01/15/2008 05:28 AM »
We may not be able to conclude or even detect the presense of Apollo descent stage which is 4.2M in dia  with a 5 M resolution of TMC instrument.

We may see a couple of pixcels with a different radiometric properties than the surrounding area but the shape of the object can't be  determined.

Chinese probe which is launched recently may be able to do the job with 1M res.

=
S^3

Offline Satori

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #8 on: 02/13/2008 08:18 PM »
The launch of India's Moon mission is delayed to June or July due to technical problems.

Offline m.prasad

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #9 on: 05/28/2008 02:13 PM »
Hi folks,
Have one doubt on the instuments. Both the instruments HySI & M3 do the Moon minerology mapping. Similarly, for X rays mapping 2 instruments -  HEX, C1XS are being sent.

If both the instruments are doing same type of work, then itz duplication of the work. right? But actually it is not.

Then in what ways these instruments are different? I guess itz in the spectral\enrgy bands in which they operate.

Thanks
Prasad MVL

Offline anik

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #10 on: 05/30/2008 03:02 PM »
http://www.moondaily.com/reports/India_To_Launch_First_Lunar_By_Year_End_999.html

"The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) plans to launch its first unmanned moon mission, Chandrayan-I, between October and December, a top official said yesterday [May 27 - anik] in Kolkata"

Offline hesidu

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #11 on: 05/31/2008 01:52 AM »
Is that means the launch delayed again ?
Any explanation was given ?
« Last Edit: 05/31/2008 01:53 AM by hesidu »

Offline Satori

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #12 on: 06/15/2008 01:30 PM »
According to The Hindu the launch of Chandrayaan-1 could take place on September 19th.

Offline s^3

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #13 on: 07/13/2008 04:18 PM »
Latest authentic info from Kasturirangan on Chandrayan mission

http://www.cat.gov.in/happenings/fdaykkr.pdf

Offline Satori

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #14 on: 08/06/2008 11:32 PM »
The launch of Chandrayaan-1 can be delayed to October according to The Times of India.

Offline isro-watch

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #15 on: 08/10/2008 04:20 AM »
yes, the launch has been postponed...if it's delayed further a launch during november-december is very difficult as it is rainy season here at sriharikota.

1. Accoring to reports the first stage has been stacked on the launch pad. ISRO faced difficulty in putting this rocket on first launch pad as the nozzle of the engine was getting blocked. So, this means that SLP willl not be vacant for a GSLV-D3 launch this year.

2. The delay is being attributed to some problems with the second stage. As far as my knowledge goes this is probably the 4th flight facing problem with second stage. Earlier PSLV C9,C10, GSLV F04 faced similar problems...all due to some faulty gas chamber.(no sufficient evidence to prove that the same problem haunted the engine...clear reason yet unknown but the problem is of that 2nd stage)

3. If all goes well, we can expect a end-october launch.

hoping for the best....

Offline William Graham

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #16 on: 09/11/2008 04:24 PM »
Launch is NET 22 October, the window extends until 26 October, according to:

http://www.ptinews.com/pti%5Cptisite.nsf/0/27F32ADF6B7F47F7652574C1004D74D7?OpenDocument

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #17 on: 09/25/2008 12:12 PM »
Europe all set for lunar mission Chandrayaan-1

25 September 2008

Europe is participating in a big way in the Indian Space Agency's Chandrayaan-1 mission to the Moon, by contributing three instruments. All these instruments have now been delivered, tested and integrated with the spacecraft.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMM0RQ4KKF_index_0.html

Offline anik

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #18 on: 10/04/2008 06:11 AM »
Chandrayaan-I on way to integration with launch rocket PSLV-C11 news
03 October 2008

http://www.domain-b.com/aero/space/spacemissions/20081003_chandrayaan-I.html 

"Bangalore: India's lunar probe, Chandrayaan I, has begun its ground journey to Sriharikota Range (SHAR) to be integrated with its launch rocket, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-C11. At SHAR, the lunar orbiter will begin its 50-hour pre-launch countdown on the night of 19 October. Chandrayaan is expected to complete its journey to SHAR in a day or two"

Offline orvillewright

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Re: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #19 on: 10/06/2008 08:29 PM »
I'm confused.  Is PSLV-C11 going to stack on the North pad, or roll out to the South pad from the VAB?

Offline anik

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Offline anik

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Quote from http://www.isro.org/

"Chandrayaan-1 Live Webcast 22nd Oct 2008 0550 - 0650 Hrs (IST) [00:20 - 01:20 UTC - anik]"

Offline Jirka Dlouhy

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« Last Edit: 10/19/2008 01:04 PM by Jirka Dlouhy »

Offline faustod

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Some photos from Shriharikota

Very nice pictures!
« Last Edit: 10/20/2008 04:52 PM by faustod »

Offline jcm

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A Glimpse of Chandrayaan-1: 
 India's First Mission to Moon

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/index.htm
 

This would be a lot nicer if the images were scanned properly
e.g.  http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/images/image57.jpg


-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org


Offline jacqmans

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RELEASE: 08-263

NASA RETURNS TO THE MOON WITH INSTRUMENTS ON INDIAN SPACECRAFT

WASHINGTON -- Two NASA instruments to map the lunar surface will
launch on India's maiden moon voyage. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper will
assess mineral resources, and the Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar,
or Mini-SAR, will map the polar regions and look for ice deposits.
The Indian Space Research Organization, or ISRO, is scheduled to
launch its robotic Chandrayaan-1 on Oct. 22 from Sriharikota, India.

Data from the two instruments will contribute to NASA's increased
understanding of the lunar environment as it implements the nation's
space exploration policy, which calls for robotic and human missions
to the moon.

"The opportunity to fly NASA instruments on Chandrayaan-1 undoubtedly
will lead to important scientific discoveries," NASA Administrator
Michael Griffin said. "This exciting collaboration represents an
important next step in what we hope to be a long and mutually
beneficial relationship with India in future civil space
exploration."

The Moon Mineralogy Mapper is a state-of-the-art imaging spectrometer
that will provide the first map of the entire lunar surface at high
spatial and spectral resolution, revealing the minerals that make up
the moon's surface. Scientists will use this information to answer
questions about the moon's origin and geological development, as well
as the evolution of terrestrial planets in the early solar system.
The map also may be used by astronauts to locate resources, possibly
including water, that can support exploration of the moon and beyond.


The Mini-SAR is a small imaging radar that will map the permanently
shadowed lunar polar regions, including large areas never visible
from Earth. The Mini-SAR data will be used to determine the location
and distribution of water ice deposits on the moon. Data from the
instrument will help scientists learn about the history and nature of
objects hitting the moon, and the processes that throw material from
the outer solar system into the inner planets.

The spacecraft also will carry four instruments and a small lunar
impactor provided by ISRO, and four instruments from Europe. ISRO
will launch the vehicle into a lunar polar orbit for a two-year
mission.

In addition to the two science instruments, NASA will provide space
communications support to Chandrayaan-1. The primary location for the
NASA ground tracking station will be at the Johns Hopkins University
Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md.

For more information about Chandrayaan-1, visit:
http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan


For more information about the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, visit:
http://m3.jpl.nasa.gov   

For more information about the Mini-SAR, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Mini-RF/main/index.html

Offline faustod

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PSLV-C11 with Chandrayaan 1 sitting on the launch Pad.
« Last Edit: 10/21/2008 03:49 PM by faustod »

Offline Satori

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Very nice program explaining the Chandrayaan-1 mission...

Offline Satori

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Offline dwmzmm

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Some photos from Shriharikota

Very nice pictures!


I second that; looks like a nice scale model rocket project!
Dave, NAR # 21853 SR.

Offline Satori

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Chandrayaan-1 processing...

Offline Chris Bergin

They're making a big deal out of mining for He3. Thought that had been played down of late.

Offline Satori

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Live from the pad...

Online nacnud

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Re: He3 mining

Er it's always been played down once you get into it. I suppose there are just so few other things that could be construed to be valuable enough to mine on the moon.
« Last Edit: 10/21/2008 11:48 PM by nacnud »

Offline Satori

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Offline DaveS

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Just a note of interest: NASA TV will broadcast this launch live starting at 8:30 pm Eastern time.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline Satori

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Just a note of interest: NASA TV will broadcast this launch live starting at 8:30 pm Eastern time.

Thanks for that note because my connection is playing with me again!...

Offline Chris Bergin

Good news about the NASA TV webcast Dave. The previous option wasn't all that great.

The launch vehicle is a PSLV-XL, right?

Offline Satori

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The launch vehicle is a PSLV-XL, right?

Yes, PSLV-XL (C11).

Offline Chris Bergin

Thanks. Do we know of a good page with specific info on this vehicle.

Offline Satori

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Launch control center...

Offline Satori

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Thanks. Do we know of a good page with specific info on this vehicle.

Try here http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page10.htm


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Offline Satori

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Well, webcast director keeps given us images from the launch control center. In one of the monitors we can see that daylight has arrived to SHAR.

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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NASA TV now on:

"Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." - Robert Goddard

Offline Satori

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PSLV-XL (C11) on the pad!

Offline William Graham

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T-20 mins, on internal.

Offline William Graham

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Launch window is 00:52:11 - 01:07 GMT. Launch is targeted for the start of the window.


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The final destination... the Moon!

Offline Satori

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Extra large strap-ons...

Offline Satori

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Offline Satori

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Offline William Graham

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As interesting as the processing video is, they're getting awfully close to launch...

Offline Chris Bergin

As interesting as the processing video is, they're getting awfully close to launch...

Yeah!


Offline Satori

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Offline Ronsmytheiii

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"Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." - Robert Goddard

Offline William Graham

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L-60 seconds

Offline jaythehokie

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4-16-07: We will never forget...


Offline William Graham

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Offline William Graham

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Offline Chris Bergin

T+60 seconds nominal performance. Loving this commentary! ;)

Offline William Graham

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SRB sep, 1/2 staging confirmed.
« Last Edit: 10/22/2008 12:55 AM by GW_Simulations »

Offline Satori

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Offline William Graham

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Rocket has reached space.


Offline William Graham

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Fairing separation.

Offline William Graham

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Closed loop guidance initiated.

Offline William Graham

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2/3 sep, stage 3 ignition.


Offline Chris Bergin

Plus 6 mins. Everything nominal.

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Offline William Graham

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Stage 3/4 separation. Flight looks nominal so far.

Offline William Graham

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Stage 4 ignition.

Offline William Graham

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L+10 minutes.

Offline Satori

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Offline Satori

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I don't know if they have given the exact launch tme, did anyone managed to get it?

Offline Chris Bergin

Launch video:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=14704.0 - T-60 seconds to around T+7mins.

(Free video section - you just need to be logged into the forum).

Offline William Graham

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Stage 4 burnout.

Offline William Graham

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Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Will a TLI be performed, or am I thinking too much in the Apollo paradigm?
"Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace." - Robert Goddard

Offline Satori

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Chandrayaan-1 on its way to the Moon!!!

Offline Chris Bergin

Happy engineers. Congrats to India.

Offline Chris Bergin

Heh, someone pressed the wrong button and we got 10 seconds of MTV India ;)

Offline Chris Bergin

Well they've got a learning curve on webcasting launches, but the vehicle worked, so all's well.

End of webcast.

We'll keep this thread going for mission updates.

Offline dwmzmm

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Congratulations to India for a very successful launch!  Only wish the liftoff image
was more clear.  Looking forward to the results of the spacecraft's experiments.
Dave, NAR # 21853 SR.

Offline Peter NASA

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Launch video:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=14704.0 - T-60 seconds to around T+7mins.

(Free video section - you just need to be logged into the forum).

Thanks, I missed the launch.


Cobgratulations to India/ISRO.

Offline Nick L.

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Damn, missed it. Congrats to India for a successful launch!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline edkyle99

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Will a TLI be performed, or am I thinking too much in the Apollo paradigm?

PSLV-C11 put Chandrayaan 1 into a 256 x 22,866 km x 17.8 deg initial orbit, according to ISRO.  The spacecraft will use its own liquid apogee motor (LAM) to gradually raise its apogee during a series of perigee burns - first to 37,000 km, then to 73,000 km, and finally to 387,000 km.  Chandrayaan 1 will fly close to the Moon on about November 8, when the LAM will fire again to drop it into lunar orbit. 

BTW, the prelaunch video showed a brief clip of the interesting dual-engine PS4 (fourth) stage, which burned 2.5 tonnes of MMH/MON 3 for 516.6 seconds, accounting for almost half of the total PSLV ascent duration.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 10/24/2008 04:24 AM by edkyle99 »

Offline s^3

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Thanks Chris for the video.

Celestrak has not yet included state vectors.

Perhaps  ISRO has not yet released them.

BTW which are the other websites giving the state vectors in near real time?
« Last Edit: 10/22/2008 05:40 AM by s^3 »

Offline jacqmans

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Chandrayaan-1, India's first mission to the Moon, was successfully launched earlier this morning from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SHAR) in Sriharikota, India.
 
The PSLV-C11 rocket, an upgraded version of the Indian Space Research Organization's (ISRO's) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, lifted off at 02:52 Central European Summer Time (CEST) and, about 20 minutes later, injected the spacecraft into a highly elongated orbit around the Earth.

Read more at:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMCYMY5KMF_index_0.html

Offline jacqmans

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PSLV-C11 Successfully Launches Chandrayaan-1
October 22, 2008   
 
   
 In its fourteenth flight conducted from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR, Sriharikota this morning (October 22, 2008), the Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO’s) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, PSLV-C11, successfully launched the 1380 kg Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft into a transfer orbit with a perigee (nearest point to Earth) of 255 km and an apogee (farthest point to Earth) of 22,860 km, inclined at an angle of 17.9 deg to the equator.

After a 52 hour count down, PSLV-C11 lifted off from the Second Launch Pad at SDSC SHAR at 06:22 Hrs Indian Standard Time (IST) with the ignition of the core first stage. The important flight events included the separation of the first stage, ignition of the second stage, separation of the payload fairing at about 116 km altitude after the vehicle had cleared the dense atmosphere, second stage separation, third stage ignition, third stage separation, fourth stage ignition and fourth stage cut-off.

PSLV-C11 is the uprated version of ISRO’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle in its standard configuration. Weighing 320 tonnes at lift-off, the vehicle uses larger strap-on motors (PSOM-XL) to achieve higher payload capability. PSOM-XL uses 12 tonnes of solid propellants instead of 9 tonnes used in the earlier configuration of PSLV. PSLV is a four stage launch vehicle employing both solid and liquid propulsion stages. PSLV is the trusted workhorse launch Vehicle of ISRO. During 1993-2008 period, PSLV had fourteen launches of which thirteen (including today’s launch) are consecutively successful. PSLV has repeatedly proved its reliability and versatility by launching 30 spacecraft (14 Indian and 16 for international customers) into a variety of orbits so far.

Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Thiruvananthapuram, designed and developed PSLV. ISRO Inertial Systems Unit (IISU) at Thiruvananthapuram developed the inertial systems. The Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC), also at Thiruvananthapuram, developed the liquid propulsion stages for the second and fourth stages of PSLV as well as reaction control systems. SDSC SHAR processed the solid propellant motors and carried out launch operations. ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) provided telemetry, tracking and command support.

Chandrayaan-1 is India’s first spacecraft mission beyond Earth’s orbit. It aims to further expand our knowledge about Earth’s only natural satellite – the moon. With well-defined objectives, Chandrayaan-1 mission intends to put an unmanned spacecraft into an orbit around the moon and to perform remote sensing of our nearest celestial neighbour for about two years using eleven scientific instruments built in India and five other countries.

The primary objectives of Chandrayaan-1 are:

To place an unmanned spacecraft in an orbit around the moon
To conduct mineralogical and chemical mapping of the lunar surface
To upgrade the technological base in the country
Chandrayaan-1 aims to achieve these well-defined objectives through high-resolution remote sensing of moon in the visible, near infrared, microwave and X-ray regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. With this, preparation of a 3-dimensional atlas of the lunar surface and chemical and mineralogical mapping of entire lunar surface is envisaged.

PSLV placed the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft into a highly elliptical Transfer Orbit (TO) around the earth. Later, through a series of highly complex manoeuvres, the desired trajectories will be achieved. After circling the Earth in its Transfer Orbit, Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft will be taken into more elliptical ‘Extended Transfer Orbits’ by repeatedly firing its Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) in a pr-determined sequence. Subsequently, the LAM is again fired to make the spacecraft to travel to the vicinity of the moon.

When it reaches the vicinity of the Moon and passes at a few hundred kilometers from it, its LAM is fired again so that the spacecraft slows down sufficiently to enable the gravity of the moon to capture it into an elliptical orbit.

Following this, the height of the spacecraft’s orbit around the moon is reduced in steps. After a careful and detailed observation of the orbit perturbations there, the orbital height of Chandrayaan-1 will be finally lowered to its intended 100 km height from the lunar surface. Moon Impact Probe will be ejected from Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft at the earliest opportunity to hit the lunar surface in a chosen area.

Later, cameras and other scientific instruments are turned ON and thoroughly tested. This leads to the operational phase of the mission. This phase lasts for about two years during which Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft explores the lunar surface with its array of instruments that includes cameras, spectrometers and SAR.

The Payloads: There are 11 payloads (scientific instruments) through which Chandrayaan-1 intends to achieve its scientific objectives.

They include five instruments designed and developed in India, three instruments from European Space Agency (one of which is developed jointly with India and the other with Indian contribution), one from Bulgaria and two from the United States.

The Indian payloads of Chandrayaan-1 are:

Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC), a CCD camera that maps the topography of the moon, which helps in better understanding of the lunar evolution process.

Hyperspectral Imager (HySI), another CCD camera, is designed for mapping of the minerals on the lunar surface as well as for understanding the mineralogical composition of Moon’s interior.

Lunar Laser Ranging Instrument (LLRI) provides necessary data for accurately determining the height of lunar surface features.

High Energy X-ray Spectrometer (HEX) is designed to help explore the possibility of identifying Polar Regions covered by thick water-ice deposits as well as in identifying regions of high Uranium and Thorium concentrations.

Moon Impact Probe (MIP) demonstrates the technologies required for landing a probe at the desired location on the moon. It is also intended to qualify some of the technologies related to future soft landing missions.

The six international payloads of Chandrayaan-1 are:

Chandrayaan-1 Imaging X ray Spectrometer (C1XS), an ESA payload and jointly developed by Rutherford Appleton Laboratory of England and ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore, intends is to carry out high quality mapping of the moon using X-ray fluorescence technique for finding the presnce of Magnesium, Aluminium, Silicon, Iron and Titanium distributed over the surface of the Moon.

Smart Near Infrared Spectrometer (SIR-2), another ESA payload, developed by Max Plank Institute of Germany, aims to study the lunar surface to explore the mineral resources and the formation of its surface features.

Sub kiloelectronvolt Atom Reflecting Analyser (SAR), the third payload from ESA, is built by Swedish Institute of Space Physics and Space Physics Laboratory of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Tiruvananthapuram. The aim of this instrument is to study the surface composition of the moon and the magnetic anomalies associated with the surface of the moon.

Radiation Dose Monitor (RADOM), a payload developed by Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, aims to characterise the radiation environment in a region of space surrounding the moon.

Mini Synthetic Aperture Radar (MiniSAR) is one of the two scientific instruments from the USA and is from Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory and Naval Air Warfare Centre, USA through NASA. MiniSAR is mainly intended for detecting water ice in the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar poles up to a depth of a few meters.

Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) is an imaging spectrometer from Brown University and Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the US through NASA, is intended to assess and map lunar mineral resources at high spatial and spectral resolution.

The Spacecraft: Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft weighed about 1380 kg at the time of its launch and is a 1.5 m cuboid with a solar panel projecting from one of its sides. The spacecraft is powered by a single solar panel generating electrical power of 700 W. A Lithium ion battery supplies power when the solar panel is not illuminated by the sun. To make Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft to travel towards the Moon, its Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) is used. Liquid propellants needed for LAM as well as thrusters are stored onboard the spacecraft. Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s Dual Gimballed Antenna transmits the scientific data gathered by its eleven scientific instruments to Earth.

Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft was built at ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore with contributions from Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) and ISRO Inertial Systems Unit (IISU) at Tiruvananthapuram, Space Applications Centre (SAC) and Physical Research Laboratory (PRL), Ahmedabad and Laboratory for Electro-optic Systems (LEOS), Bangalore.

The Ground Segment: The Ground facilities of Chandrayaan-1 perform the important task of receiving the health information as well as the scientific data from the spacecraft. It also transmits the radio commands to be sent to the spacecraft during all the phases of its mission. Besides, it processes and stores the scientific data sent by Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft.

ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) had a lead role in establishing the Ground Segment of Chandrayaan-1 with contributions from ISAC and SAC. The Ground Segment of Chandrayaan-1 consists of:

Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN)
Spacecraft Control Centre (SCC)
Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC)
The Indian Deep Space Network receives the data sent by the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft. Besides, it sends commands to the spacecraft at a power level of upto 20 kilowatts. IDSN consists of two large parabolic antennas – one with 18 m diameter and the other 32 m diameter – at Byalalu, situated at a distance of about 35 km from Bangalore. Of these the 32 m antenna with its ‘seven mirror beam waveguide system’, was indigenously designed, developed, built, installed, tested and qualified. The 18 m antenna can support Chandrayaan-1 mission, but the 32m antenna can support spacecraft missions well beyond Moon.

The Spacecraft Control Centre, located near the ISTRAC campus at Peenya, North of Bangalore, is the focal point of all the operational activities of Chandrayaan-1 during all the phases of the mission.

The Indian Space Science Data Centre forms the third element of Chandrayaan-1 ground segment. Also located at Byalalu, ISSDC receives data from IDSN as well as other external stations that support Chandrayaan-1, stores, processes, archives, retrieves and distributes scientific data sent by Chandrayaan-1 payloads to the user agencies.
 

Offline faustod

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Pic of the Chandrayaan-1 , PSLV-C11 launch.
« Last Edit: 10/22/2008 04:51 PM by faustod »

Offline Satori

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Other photos of the launch available in here.

Offline glanmor05

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That's certainly a cool looking LV.

(Total novice question), 4 stages, have there been many other (any) LV's with that many?
"Through struggles, to the stars."

Offline iamlucky13

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That's certainly a cool looking LV.

(Total novice question), 4 stages, have there been many other (any) LV's with that many?

Counting the strap-ons, you could even call it 4.5 stages. Then again, if you really want to push definitions, you could divide the entire Apollo system into 6 stages (S-IC, S-II, S-IVB, CSM, LEM descent, LEM ascent, plus another CSM firing), but that's an entire system, not just a launch vehicle. Chandrayaan itself would count as a fifth stage if we wanted to read it this way.

There's been a few. Several older, smaller rockets trying to push the performance for established lower stages like the Juno-1 that launched Explorer-1 for example. The Orbital Sciences Minotaur and Russian Proton-M are current examples.

Oooohh...almost forgot, the old Soviet N-1 would have been a five stage rocket. I don't think they ever successfully reached 1st stage separation in the few flights they attempted. Very complicated and rather fascinating rocket.
« Last Edit: 10/22/2008 07:47 PM by iamlucky13 »

Offline glanmor05

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Thanks for that.  I'm gonna do some reading on that lot now!!
"Through struggles, to the stars."

Offline edkyle99

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That's certainly a cool looking LV.

(Total novice question), 4 stages, have there been many other (any) LV's with that many?

Cool looking perhaps, and an impressive accomplishment for India, but PSLV is a fairly complex vehicle for the current era.  It consists of four core stages (two solid, two liquid) augmented by six strap-on solid boosters.  The two liquid stages use two different propellant combinations.  The strap-on solids don't all ignite together.  Four start on the pad.  Two start 25 seconds after liftoff. 

Contrast with Delta 2, which can do the same with one less core stage.  Or with Taurus II, which is expected to do the same with one less core stage and no strap-on boosters.  Or with Falcon 9, which is expected to be able to do more with only two stages.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline otisbow

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Did anybody make a dvd of NASA's launch coverage?

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Chandrayaan-1’s apogee has been raised to 37,900 km, while its perigee has been raised a little, to 305 km... : http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Oct23_2008.htm

Offline Chris Bergin

Thanks Stan. This is a good reminder that while we're more about launch coverage here (apart from Shuttle), I do encourage you all to continue to follow this spacecraft via this thread.

I'll move it back into its home section on the forum later to all that continuation.

Offline jabe

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one more orbit increase
from here
Quote
With this engine firing, Chandrayaan-1’s apogee has been further raised to 74,715 km, while its perigee has been raised to 336 km. In this orbit, Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft takes about twenty-five and a half hours to go round the Earth once
jb

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Offline Cbased

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Offtopic (but I found it very funny).

Rove (Australian TV) has just had a joke about this launch. Not exact words but he said something like this:
"India launched their first mission to the Moon. USA and Russia have done this a long time ago. Haven't they (indians) been told about it? Imagine they land on the Moon and see the Amazing Race host greeting them - India, you are the last team to arrive, you are eliminated from the Space Race" ;)))

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I wonder what he will say when the Australians finally get there (i.e. if they manage to).

My heartiest congratulations to ISRO and to the great team at ISRO. A remarkable achievement indeed.

Offtopic (but I found it very funny).

Rove (Australian TV) has just had a joke about this launch. Not exact words but he said something like this:
"India launched their first mission to the Moon. USA and Russia have done this a long time ago. Haven't they (indians) been told about it? Imagine they land on the Moon and see the Amazing Race host greeting them - India, you are the last team to arrive, you are eliminated from the Space Race" ;)))

Offline stanmarsh

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Chandrayaan orbit to be raised to 267,000 Km...
Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Chandrayaan_orbit_to_be_raised_ISRO/articleshow/3649512.cms

Excerpt:

CHENNAI: The earth orbit of India's first lunar spacecraft will be raised to 267,000 km Wednesday, an official here said.

"The Chandrayaan spacecraft, orbiting at a distance of around 165,000 km apogee (farthest point from earth) will be raised Wednesday to around 267,000 km. As of now, everything is normal and as per our expectations," Chandrayaan-1 project director M. Annadurai said.

The third orbit-raising was done Oct 26 and the spacecraft was raised up to 164,600 km, instead of 199,277 km apogee as originally announced by the Indian Space Research
Organisation (ISRO).

"The important date for us is Nov 3 when the final orbit manoeuvre will happen. Between Oct 22 and Nov 3 we have the leeway to carry out the orbit raising activity," he said.

On Nov 3, the ISRO will take the spacecraft to 384,000 km apogee. The subsequent firing of spacecraft motors will take it near the lunar orbit and it is expected to get into lunar orbit Nov 8.

During the lunar orbit, the spacecraft's motors will be fired five times - called lunar burn - to take it to 100 km of the moon's radius.

"We expect that to happen November 14 or November 15," Annadurai said.

According to him the spacecraft has sufficient fuel on board. "Going up, the spacecraft spends less fuel to travel the same distance," he added. On Oct 23, the spacecraft's motors were fired for 18 minutes to take it to 37,900 km apogee.

Subsequently, the spacecraft motors were fired for 16 minutes and 9.5 minutes Oct 25 and Oct 26 respectively to take it to 74,715 km and 164,600 km respectively. "On Wednesday we will fire the spacecraft motors for 190 seconds (3.17 minutes) to take it to 267,000 km. On Nov 3, the motor firing will be for around 150 seconds (2.5 minutes) to take the spacecraft to 384,000 km," Annadurai said.

Till date, the spacecraft has expended around 340 kg of fuel of the lift off capacity of 819 kg. The spacecraft's motor firing Wednesday and Nov 3 would consume around 40-50 kg of fuel.

"Another 100 kg fuel might be expended to put Chandrayaan into its intended orbit near the moon, leaving sufficient quantities of fuel for the spacecraft to orbit for two years," he added.

Offline stanmarsh

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chandrayaan-1 was scheduled to be pushed up to 348x199277 Kms. However as per the news article above, it was pushed only to 164600 Kms apogee. Can anyone hypothesize on the causes for this deviation ?

check this link for details on orbital maneuvers: http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan/htmls/mission_sequence.htm

Offline Stephan

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Best regards, Stephan

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can anybody tell me why this site is showing a dismal altitude for chandrayaan-1?

http://n2yo.com/?s=33405

rgds

Offline Stephan

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The word "live" is misleading, this site uses the TLE orbital elements (just like Heavens-Above or Calsky).
As long as the elements are not updated (by Space-Track most of the times), the trajectory shown will not be correct.
Best regards, Stephan

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Latest update from ISRO: The terrain mapping camera on chandrayaan was turned on the earth and tested ! Here is the link: http://isro.org/pressrelease/Oct31_2008.htm


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Offline stanmarsh

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ISRO reports the craft is in its lunar transfer orbit:

http://isro.org/pressrelease/Nov04_2008.htm

On Nov 8th the engines will be fired to insert the craft into Lunar orbit.

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TV reports says Chandrayaan has been successfully inserted into the lunar orbit. at at apogee of some 500km. initially it would be on an elliptical orbit. and then brought down to a near circular one around 100km from moon.
more confirmation needed, though!

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isro website as usual is lagging... no mention of the momentous event yet.

Offline jabe

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looks like a Success
Quote
Chandrayaan-1, India’s first unmanned spacecraft mission to moon, entered lunar orbit today (November 8, 2008).

Offline hornbill2007

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yes, its official now.
Quote
http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Nov08_2008.htm
Chandrayaan-1, India’s first unmanned spacecraft mission to moon, entered lunar orbit today (November 8, 2008). This is the first time that an Indian built spacecraft has broken away from the Earth’s gravitational field and reached the moon. This historic event occurred following the firing of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s liquid engine at 16:51 IST for a duration of 817 seconds. The highly complex ‘lunar orbit insertion manoeuvre’ was performed from Chandrayaan-1 Spacecraft Control Centre of ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network at Bangalore.


Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) at Byalalu supported the crucial task of transmitting commands and continuously monitoring this vital event with two dish antennas, one measuring 18 m and the other 32 m.

Chandrayaan-1’s liquid engine was fired when the spacecraft passed at a distance of about 500 km from the moon to reduce its velocity to enable lunar gravity to capture it into an orbit around the moon. The spacecraft is now orbiting the moon in an elliptical orbit that passes over the polar regions of the moon. The nearest point of this orbit (periselene) lies at a distance of about 504 km from the moon’s surface while the farthest point (aposelene) lies at about 7502 km. Chandrayaan-1 takes about 11 hours to go round the moon once in this orbit.

The performance of all the systems onboard Chandrayaan-1 is normal. In the coming days, the height of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s orbit around the moon will be carefully reduced in steps to achieve a final polar orbit of about 100 km height from the moon’s surface. Following this, the Moon Impact Probe (MIP) of the spacecraft will be released to hit the lunar surface. Later, the other scientific instruments will be turned ON sequentially leading to the normal phase of the mission.


It may be recalled that Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft was launched on October 22, 2008 by PSLV-C11 from India’s spaceport at Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR, Sriharikota. As intended, PSLV placed the spacecraft in a highly oval shaped orbit with a perigee (nearest point to Earth) of 255 km and an apogee (farthest point to Earth) of 22,860 km. In the past two weeks, the liquid engine of Chandrayaan-1 has been successfully fired five times at opportune moments to increase the apogee height, first to 37,900 km, then to 74,715 km, later to 164,600 km, after that to 267,000 km and finally to 380,000km, as planned. During this period, the Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC), one of the eleven payloads (scientific instruments) of the spacecraft, was successfully operated twice to take the pictures, first of the Earth, and then moon.

With today’s successful manoeuvre, India becomes the fifth country to send a spacecraft to Moon. The other countries, which have sent spacecraft to Moon, are the United States, former Soviet Union, Japan and China. Besides, the European Space Agency (ESA), a consortium of 17 countries, has also sent a spacecraft to moon.


Offline stanmarsh

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Thanks for the update hornbill2007. Looks like the most crucial part of the lunar mission is complete . Congrats to ISRO !

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Chandrayaan_enters_lunar_orbit/articleshow/3689519.cms

Offline glanmor05

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Where can I find details of the up-coming burns?
« Last Edit: 11/09/2008 10:39 AM by glanmor05 »
"Through struggles, to the stars."

Offline stanmarsh

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Here is a Q&A that a news channel had with ISRO chairman Mr. Nair:

http://ibnlive.in.com/news/chandrayaan-in-moon-orbit--how-it-works--pics/77731-11.html?fads=ads

G Madhavan Nair: Basically we have text book values about moon's shape, its speed, its position and its gravitational field and so on. But how far it is accurate we don't know. We were facing for the first time. So that's the reason, we took two orbits more. We went around almost the lunar height and came back and calibrated our system. We had a fairly good confidence. But still in a mission like this anything can go wrong. But we were careful and our team has precisely implemented the commanding operations and the tracking operations. The result is perfect.

Offline morgen

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Chandrayaan's first photo of Moon!

 Source

Offline stanmarsh

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First Lunar orbit reduction manoeuver was completed today (yesterday for IST folks). Periselene is now 200 kms.

Link: http://isro.org/pressrelease/Nov10_2008.htm

Finally they have a flash explaining the orbital manoeuvers, but it seems to be incorrect, as it shows the periselene constant, while a reducing aposelene. But as per ISRO press release, the aposelene is currently constant and periselene has been reduced to 200 kms.

Offline isro-watch

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Re: RE: Chandrayan - 1 .. Indian mission for Moon
« Reply #128 on: 11/11/2008 11:44 AM »
http://www.hindu.com/2008/11/11/stories/2008111158200100.htm

Chandrayaan placed in 255*187 km around moon

Offline morgen

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Isro has officially released the Moon's photo taken by Chadrayaan.

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Chandrayaan-1 gets further closer to moon
Bangalore (PTI): Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft on Tuesday moved closer to the Moon with ISRO scientists carrying out orbit reduction manoeuvre at 18:30 hours for a duration of 31 seconds.

"The current orbit of Chandrayaan-1 is 255.3 km (the farthest distance from the moon) X 101.3 km (nearest distance to the moon). The orbital period is 2.09 hours", ISRO spokesperson S Satish told PTI.

Further manoeuvres are planned in the coming days to bring the spacecraft to its final circular orbit of 100 kms above the moon's surface, Satish said.

Offline lcs

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Why would they release a picture with such poor resolution?  And why does it have such poor resolution?  I can get a better view with binoculars from earth.

Offline jabe

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Why would they release a picture with such poor resolution?  And why does it have such poor resolution?  I can get a better view with binoculars from earth.
I was thinking same thing
my guess..
Camera is "focused" to view moon at 100 km not 315000 km :)
Earth picture was much closer then the 315000 km so it was more "focused"..
But I could be wrong ;)
jb

Offline cd-slam

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Chandrayaan-1 gets further closer to moon
Bangalore (PTI): Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft on Tuesday moved closer to the Moon with ISRO scientists carrying out orbit reduction manoeuvre at 18:30 hours for a duration of 31 seconds.

"The current orbit of Chandrayaan-1 is 255.3 km (the farthest distance from the moon) X 101.3 km (nearest distance to the moon). The orbital period is 2.09 hours", ISRO spokesperson S Satish told PTI.

Further manoeuvres are planned in the coming days to bring the spacecraft to its final circular orbit of 100 kms above the moon's surface, Satish said.

Is there a scheduled time for the release and impact of the Moon Impact Probe? I couldn't find this on ISRO site but one media site showed November 15. Given the time difference, could be quite close to the shuttle launch. 

Online hop

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Why would they release a picture with such poor resolution?
Why not ? There is tremendous interest in the mission. Sure, it's not a great image, but it gives to public something. I'm personally glad to see a space agency willing to release stuff like this.
Quote
And why does it have such poor resolution?  I can get a better view with binoculars from earth.
Keep in mind that the TMC is not like your digital camera. It's a pushbroom imager (actually 3 of them) (see here for a description of this technique) that relies on spacecraft motion to build up an image. So not only is it operating 3000x further away than it's nominal science orbit, it is also working under rather different conditions.

These sort of instruments require a significant degree of calibration and checkout, and both the operations and data processing teams need to come up to speed.

BTW,  Martian chronicles has a nice two part description of the instruments.

Offline Shturmanskie

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Chandrayaan-1 now reported to be in final orbit:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Chandrayaan-I_reaches_its_final_resting_orbit/articleshow/3705426.cms

Not from the official source but coming from the largest newspaper in the country should be pretty reliable.

Offline jabe

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They mention the success here as well.
lets hope the instruments are still working well..the pictures should be stunning...

Offline s^3

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Possible timetag for the drop of MIP : ( about 1630GMT on 14/NOV )


Quote



Bangalore, November 13: The Indian flag is all set to mark its presence on the lunar surface for the first time on Friday as a moon probe with the tri-colour painted on it will detach from Chandrayaan-1 and descend onto the earth's natural satellite.


"The Moon Impact Probe is expected to be detached (from Chandrayaan-1) at around 10 pm on Friday," Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) spokesperson S Satish said.
...

"During its 20-minute descend to the moon's surface, MIP will take pictures and transmit these back to the ground," he said.

...

the primary objective of MIP is to demonstrate the technologies required for landing a probe at the desired location on the moon.

The probe will help qualify some of the technologies related to future soft landing missions. This apart, scientific exploration of the moon at close distance is also intended using MIP.


The 29-kg MIP consists of a C-band Radar Altimeter for continuous measurement of altitude of the probe, a video imaging system for acquiring images of the surface of moon from the descending probe and a mass spectrometer for measuring the constituents of extremely thin lunar atmosphere during its 20-minute descent to the lunar surface.

ISRO officials are confident that the MIP would withstand the impact once it hits the lunar surface. "Most probably it will not disintegrate," an ISRO official said

Also this:

Quote
at an altitude of 100 kilometres, ISRO will issue commands to re-orient and eject the MIP, which has an onboard motor that will fire for two seconds to slow the MIP's descent velocity to 75 metres per second. During its descent to the lunar surface, the MIP will activate its video-camera which will capture images of the lunar surface that will be instrumental in ISRO's decision to pick a suitable landing site for Chandrayaan-2's rover.

The MIP's altimeter will measure its altitude from the Moon's surface every second, while a third instrument, the mass spectrometer, will sense the moon's atmospheric constituents as it free falls to the lunar surface. All data would be transmitted to Chandrayaan-1 till the MIP crash-lands on the moon, which in turn would be beamed back to earth.
« Last Edit: 11/13/2008 10:22 AM by s^3 »

Offline stanmarsh

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I don't recall an Indian flag being a part of the Impact Probe Payload. Is there any confirmation of this ?

Here is the official information about MIP : http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan/htmls/mip.htm

Excerpt: Sounds pretty interesting ! I wonder if they will release images from the impact probe ...  that would be awesome !!

MIP System Configuration
The Moon Impact Probe (MIP) essentially consists of honeycomb structure, which houses all the subsystems and instruments. In addition to the instruments, the separation system, the de-boost spin and de-spin motors, it comprises of the avionics system and thermal control system. The avionics system supports the payloads and provides communication link between MIP and the main orbiter, from separation to impact and provides a database useful for future soft landing.
The mission envisages collecting all the instrument data during descent and transmits to main orbiter, which in turn will transmit them to the ground station during visible phases.

Offline cd-slam

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Possible timetag for the drop of MIP : ( about 1630GMT on 14/NOV )


Quote



Bangalore, November 13: The Indian flag is all set to mark its presence on the lunar surface for the first time on Friday as a moon probe with the tri-colour painted on it will detach from Chandrayaan-1 and descend onto the earth's natural satellite.


"The Moon Impact Probe is expected to be detached (from Chandrayaan-1) at around 10 pm on Friday," Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) spokesperson S Satish said.
...

"During its 20-minute descend to the moon's surface, MIP will take pictures and transmit these back to the ground," he said.

...

the primary objective of MIP is to demonstrate the technologies required for landing a probe at the desired location on the moon.

The probe will help qualify some of the technologies related to future soft landing missions. This apart, scientific exploration of the moon at close distance is also intended using MIP.


The 29-kg MIP consists of a C-band Radar Altimeter for continuous measurement of altitude of the probe, a video imaging system for acquiring images of the surface of moon from the descending probe and a mass spectrometer for measuring the constituents of extremely thin lunar atmosphere during its 20-minute descent to the lunar surface.

ISRO officials are confident that the MIP would withstand the impact once it hits the lunar surface. "Most probably it will not disintegrate," an ISRO official said

Also this:

Quote
at an altitude of 100 kilometres, ISRO will issue commands to re-orient and eject the MIP, which has an onboard motor that will fire for two seconds to slow the MIP's descent velocity to 75 metres per second. During its descent to the lunar surface, the MIP will activate its video-camera which will capture images of the lunar surface that will be instrumental in ISRO's decision to pick a suitable landing site for Chandrayaan-2's rover.

The MIP's altimeter will measure its altitude from the Moon's surface every second, while a third instrument, the mass spectrometer, will sense the moon's atmospheric constituents as it free falls to the lunar surface. All data would be transmitted to Chandrayaan-1 till the MIP crash-lands on the moon, which in turn would be beamed back to earth.
Thanks for all this info and fantastic achievement, will be just like the old Ranger photos. Just before Endeavour's launch, pity that it will be in the small hours of the morning my time.

And BTW there IS an Indian national flag painted on the Moon Impact Probe. It's a matter of great pride to the Indians, after all the Americans brought their flag as well.

Offline s^3

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Here is a possible updated schedule of MIP drop:

1. Launch from Mother craft : 14:33 to 14:34 GMT
2. It will fly over the Malapert crater for about nine seconds.
3. Landing of Probe on Moon : Around 1500Hrs GMT on the Rim of  Shackleton Crater ... velocity at the time of impact is abput 1.5Km/sec.

The Mothership( CY1 ) will collect the data from probe but it will not be visible to Earth because it will be behind the moon when it collects the data.

So the data will be downloaded when the Mothership re-emerges from near North Pole from behind the moon after half orbit period.

Bad news cd-slam  ..  it will be earlier still

Quote
pity that it will be in the small hours of the morning my time.


« Last Edit: 11/14/2008 07:31 AM by s^3 »

Offline isro-watch

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here is a pic of that MIP... it contains the flag...
and definitely it is a proud moment for all of us(Indians)...

HOPEFULLY THAT PAINTED FLAG WILL/ CAN SURVIVE A CRASH AT 1.5KM/SEC


I don't recall an Indian flag being a part of the Impact Probe Payload. Is there any confirmation of this ?

Here is the official information about MIP : http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan/htmls/mip.htm

Excerpt: Sounds pretty interesting ! I wonder if they will release images from the impact probe ...  that would be awesome !!

MIP System Configuration
The Moon Impact Probe (MIP) essentially consists of honeycomb structure, which houses all the subsystems and instruments. In addition to the instruments, the separation system, the de-boost spin and de-spin motors, it comprises of the avionics system and thermal control system. The avionics system supports the payloads and provides communication link between MIP and the main orbiter, from separation to impact and provides a database useful for future soft landing.
The mission envisages collecting all the instrument data during descent and transmits to main orbiter, which in turn will transmit them to the ground station during visible phases.
« Last Edit: 11/14/2008 09:41 AM by isro-watch »

Offline isro-watch

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I hope ISRO releases that video which the MIP takes on its way...

ISRO is yet to release a good resolution image taken by chandrayaan-1....I expect ISRO to copy the chinese and unveil them at a press conference in presence of the Indian Prime Minister...


Offline astropl

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Here is a possible updated schedule of MIP drop:

1. Launch from Mother craft : 14:33 to 14:34 GMT
2. It will fly over the Malapert crater for about nine seconds.
3. Landing of Probe on Moon : Around 1500Hrs GMT on the Rim of  Shackleton Crater ... velocity at the time of impact is abput 1.5Km/sec.

Updated (info from ESA team member in India):

Separation: 14:36:54 UT
Flight time: 1487.220 sec
Moon impact: 15:01:41 UT.
« Last Edit: 11/14/2008 12:30 PM by astropl »
Waldemar Zwierzchlejski (astropl)
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Offline jcm

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at an altitude of 100 kilometres, ISRO will issue commands to re-orient and eject the MIP, which has an onboard motor that will fire for two seconds to slow the MIP's descent velocity to 75 metres per second. 
This is a bizarrely odd statement. At ejection, the MIP's descent velocity is zero. Assuming the
motor fires along the velocity vector, the descent velocity is STILL zero after the burn - it then starts to increase as the probe falls toward the moon.


Do they really mean:

1) The motor slows the MIP's *orbital* velocity  *by* 75 m/s?
  This would change the orbit from 100 x 100 km to -200 x 100 km, causing an impact. I think this is most likely what they mean, and is roughly consistent with the quoted time between separation and impact - deorbit to impact would be 23 min.

2). The motor slows the MIP's orbital velocity *to* 75 m/s?
  This implies a huge delta-V of 1559 m/s and is unlikely; resulting orbit of -1735 x 100 km would result in impact in only a few minutes. Can't be that.

3) The descent velocity *at the moment of impact* is 75 m/s?
   This doesn't seem a plausible descent velocity, but maybe I'm doing my orbital calculation
incorrectly.

Does anyone have information about the deboost motor? (propellant mass, specific impulse,
thrust?)

 Jonathan
« Last Edit: 11/14/2008 01:40 PM by jcm »
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Offline jcm

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This is very helpful information. It would be great to get better orbit data for CY-1.
If your ESA contact can find out the lat and long of the spacecraft at a given time,
say the MIP separation time, and the orbit inclination of CY-1 (all I have is 'polar') that
would be fantastic.



Here is a possible updated schedule of MIP drop:

1. Launch from Mother craft : 14:33 to 14:34 GMT
2. It will fly over the Malapert crater for about nine seconds.
3. Landing of Probe on Moon : Around 1500Hrs GMT on the Rim of  Shackleton Crater ... velocity at the time of impact is abput 1.5Km/sec.

Updated (info from ESA team member in India):

Separation: 14:36:54 UT
Flight time: 1487.220 sec
Moon impact: 15:01:41 UT.

-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline astropl

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This is very helpful information. It would be great to get better orbit data for CY-1.
If your ESA contact can find out the lat and long of the spacecraft at a given time,
say the MIP separation time, and the orbit inclination of CY-1 (all I have is 'polar') that
would be fantastic.

I have, by now, only parameters of Moon Capture Burn and first orbit, Inclination is "very polar" :)

Burn Start:                    16:50:46
Burn End:                      17:04:24
Altitude at burn:            384 598,87km
Firing duration:              817,077sec
delV:                              -366,8m/s
LC:                                 504.8 x 7500.4 km
Inclination:                     90.00
Period of Face On Orbit: 10h 50min 24sec
Waldemar Zwierzchlejski (astropl)
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Offline jcm

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This is very helpful information. It would be great to get better orbit data for CY-1.
If your ESA contact can find out the lat and long of the spacecraft at a given time,
say the MIP separation time, and the orbit inclination of CY-1 (all I have is 'polar') that
would be fantastic.

I have, by now, only parameters of Moon Capture Burn and first orbit, Inclination is "very polar" :)

Burn Start:                    16:50:46
Burn End:                      17:04:24
Altitude at burn:            384 598,87km
Firing duration:              817,077sec
delV:                              -366,8m/s
LC:                                 504.8 x 7500.4 km
Inclination:                     90.00
Period of Face On Orbit: 10h 50min 24sec

That's a good start, thanks! Impressive if they really made it that polar!
Jonathan
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Offline astropl

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Impact confirmed!
Waldemar Zwierzchlejski (astropl)
http://lk.astronautilus.pl

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ISRO's press release confirming the MIP's (hard)landing.

Offline astrowiki

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And there are images.

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/moon_images.htm

Feel like some snapshots from a video.

Online hop

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And there are images.

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/moon_images.htm

Feel like some snapshots from a video.
My understanding is that the MIP camera was video. Assuming all went well, that should be a very nice show once they get the whole thing downlinked and processed :)

Offline morgen

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Good quality video of CY-1 launch. Better late than never!

http://www.youtube.com/v/WaMLYBoyQNk&hl=de&fs=1

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A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step - Lao-tzu.

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Feel like some snapshots from a video.
My understanding is that the MIP camera was video.

As per information from UMSF, it's not a video camera but a time-lapse one. Since the probe was spin-stabilized you wouldn't want to look at that video anyway.

morgen: Thanks for that video. Slightly erratic tracking, but pretty nice.
« Last Edit: 11/15/2008 08:35 PM by ugordan »

Offline astrowiki

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LASER Instrument on Chandrayaan-1 Successfully Turned ON

http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Nov16_2008.htm


Offline astrowiki

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And there is a video from TMC data:

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/videos/tmc.htm

(should open with IE)

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Ugordan, eventhough the video is not perfect, it's much better then the original one shown in TV. It was really a shame that they couldn't track the rocket for not more than a few seconds.

Offline s^3

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video of TMC. It is a QLD ( Quick Look Display ) as is acquired by the craft with only ( probably ) rotation correction because the image appears to be slightly trapezoidal. One can't have a constant scale factor throughout the image. It will be geometrically distorted and of course without any radiometric ( intensity/brightness ) corrections. You can't expect LAT/LONG details on such a image.

Offline astrowiki

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More info about the 2nd image:

"The caption on the ISRO website says that the crater in the lower left is Torricelli; thanks to Phil Stooke I know that it's actually a satellite crater of Torricelli called Torricelli C"

"The entire image is approximately 20 kilometers across. "

http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001743/



Offline morgen

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ISRO chairman Madhavan Nair says Chandrayaan-1's payloads are facing overheating problem.

Offline s^3

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The report says that it affected MIP. The MIP thing is already a history. It worked nicely and it acquired some 3000+ images. So 10 deg thing has not hampered the MIP.

The space qualified components should not get affected with just a 10 deg rise.. even the imaging array which IS sensitive to temp should work ok after cooling.. even at 10 deg higher temp it could give degraded S/N and not affect the resolution so at the most the dynamic range of brightness variation capture will be affected.

A serious problem does exist if the temperature rise is due to the operation of payload. however if the temp rise is due to solar heating in certain attidudes then the yaan can be cooled by reorientation and ISRO has ample experience of attending to such circumstances.

They should boldly tell what is the real problem.. and such things are excusable in the first attempt.

Offline jacqmans

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The Indian Space Research Organisation's lunar orbiter Chandrayaan-1 released a probe that impacted close to the lunar south pole on 14 November. Following this, the instruments on the spacecraft are being switched on to get the science observations started.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMMVL5DHNF_index_0.html

Offline morgen

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New images and RADOM data posted on ISRO's Chandrayaan site.

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Offline Shturmanskie

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A new Lunar Flyby video has been released on ISRO website -

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/videos/tmca.htm

Wonder if this was made before the so called "Heat" issues.

Offline jacqmans

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IMAGE ADVISORY: 2008-239                            Dec. 16, 2008

NASA Instrument Inaugurates 3-D Moon Imaging

PASADENA, Calif. – Different wavelengths of light provide new information about the Orientale Basin region of the moon in a new composite image taken by NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper, a guest instrument aboard the Indian Space Research Organization's Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft.

The Moon Mineralogy Mapper is the first instrument to provide highly uniform imaging of the lunar surface. Along with the length and width dimensions across a typical image, the instrument analyzes a third dimension – color.

This two-image figure, and other data from NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper Instrument can be found at: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11727.

The composite image consists of a subset of Moon Mineralogy Mapper data for the Orientale region. The image strip on the left is a color composite of data from 28 separate wavelengths of light reflected from the moon. The blue to red tones reveal changes in rock and mineral composition, and the green color is an indication of the abundance of iron-bearing minerals such as pyroxene. The image strip on the right is from a single wavelength of light that contains thermal emission, providing a new level of detail on the form and structure of the region's surface. 

The Moon Mineralogy Mapper provides scientists their first opportunity to examine lunar mineralogy at high spatial and spectral resolution. 

"The Moon Mineralogy Mapper provides us with compositional information across the moon that we have never had access to before," said Carle Pieters, the instrument's principal investigator, from Brown University in Providence, R.I. "Our ability to now identify and map the composition of the surface in geologic context provides a new level of detail needed to explore and understand Earth’s nearest neighbor."

The Orientale Basin is located on the moon's western limb. The data for this composite were captured by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper during the commissioning phase of Chandrayaan-1 as the spacecraft orbited the moon at an altitude of 100 kilometers (62 miles).

The Moon Mineralogy Mapper was selected as a Mission of Opportunity through the NASA Discovery Program. Carle Pieters of Brown University is the principal investigator and has oversight of the instrument as a whole as well as the Moon Mineralogy Mapper Science Team. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., designed and built the Moon Mineralogy Mapper and is home to its project manager, Mary White. JPL manages the project for NASA's Discovery Program in the Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft was constructed, launched, and is operated by the Indian Space Research Organization.

More information about Chandrayaan-1 is at : http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan . More information about NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper is at : http://m3.jpl.nasa.gov .


Offline Shturmanskie

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The heat problems on the craft are reported as fixed -

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7791816.stm

Offline morgen

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ISRO has released pics of the Coulomb C crater.

Offline stanmarsh

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Yes, Finally a semi-3d image..The DEM gradation is at 150 (meters ?) intervals. I expected a higher resolution as TMC is capable of 5 m resolution...Does anyone know why the resolution is this low ? Also check out the wiki page on Coulomb crater : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb_(crater)

Offline jacqmans

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RELEASE: 09-010

NASA RADAR PROVIDES FIRST LOOK INSIDE MOON'S SHADOWED CRATERS

WASHINGTON -- Using a NASA radar flying aboard India's Chandrayaan-1
spacecraft, scientists are getting their first look inside the moon's
coldest, darkest craters.

The Mini-SAR instrument, a lightweight, synthetic aperture radar, has
passed its initial in-flight tests and sent back its first data. The
images show the floors of permanently-shadowed polar craters on the
moon that aren't visible from Earth. Scientists are using the
instrument to map and search the insides of the craters for water
ice.

"The only way to explore such areas is to use an orbital imaging radar
such as Mini-SAR," said Benjamin Bussey, deputy principal
investigator for Mini-SAR, from the Johns Hopkins University Applied
Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. "This is an exciting first step for
the team which has worked diligently for more than three years to get
to this point."

The images, taken on Nov. 17, 2008, cover part of the Haworth crater
at the moon's south pole and the western rim of Seares crater, an
impact feature near the north pole. Bright areas in each image
represent either surface roughness or slopes pointing toward the
spacecraft. Further data collection by Mini-SAR and analysis will
help scientists to determine if buried ice deposits exist in the
permanently shadowed craters near the moon's poles.

These first images and other information about NASA's Mini-SAR, also
known as Mini-RF, can be found at:

http://www.nasa.gov/mini-rf

"During the next few months we expect to have a fully calibrated and
operational instrument collecting valuable science data at the moon,"
said Jason Crusan, program executive for the Mini-RF Program for
NASA's Space Operations Mission Directorate in Washington.

Mini-SAR is one of 11 instruments on the Indian Space Research
Organization's Chandrayaan-1 and one of two NASA-sponsored
contributions to its international payload. The other is the Moon
Mineralogy Mapper, a state-of-the-art imaging spectrometer that will
provide the first map of the entire lunar surface at high spatial and
spectral resolution. Data from the two NASA instruments will
contribute to the agency's increased understanding of the lunar
environment as it implements America's space exploration plan, which
calls for robotic and human missions to the moon.

Chandrayaan-1 launched from India's Satish Dhawan Space Center on Oct.
21 and began orbiting the moon Nov. 8. The Applied Physics Laboratory
performed the final integration and testing on Mini-SAR. It was
developed and built by the Naval Air Warfare Center and several other
commercial and government contributors. The Applied Physics
Laboratory's Satellite Communications Facility is Chandrayaan-1's
primary ground station in the Western Hemisphere.

For more information about the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, visit:

http://m3.jpl.nasa.gov


For more information about Chandrayaan-1, visit:

http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan

Offline jacqmans

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The Orbit of Chandrayaan-1 Raised
May 20, 2009   
 
http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/May20_2009.htm
   
 After the successful completion of all the major mission objectives, the orbit of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft, which was at a height of 100 km from the lunar surface since November 2008, has now been raised to 200 km. The orbit raising manoeuvres were carried out between 0900 and 1000 hrs IST on May 19, 2009. The spacecraft in this higher altitude will enable further studies on orbit perturbations, gravitational field variation of the Moon and also enable imaging lunar surface with a wider swath.

It may be recalled that Chandryaan-1 spacecraft launched from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota on October 22, 2008 by PSLV-C11, was inserted into lunar orbit on November 8, 2008. Over the last seven months, all the 11 payloads onboard Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft have been operationalised successfully and excellent quality data has been received. The scientific community from India and other participating international agencies are analysing the data and already several interesting results have been obtained.

Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft operations are being carried out from the Satellite Control Centre (SCC) of ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) at Bangalore and Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) at Byalalu near Bangalore. The science data from Chandrayaan-1 is being archived and disseminated from Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC), also located at Byalalu.
 

Offline Svetoslav

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Offline tappa

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Chandrayaan-1 develops critical malfunction

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/NEWS-India-Chandrayaan-1-develops-critical-malfunction/articleshow/4787712.cms

Quote
India's ambitious Chandrayaan-I Moon mission might come to a premature end as star sensors on board the spacecraft have failed.

"Star sensors are malfunctioning," S Satish, spokesperson of the Bangalore-headquartered Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said.

Star sensors played the crucial role of orientation towards the Moon.

ISRO said it has devised innovative technology and is using antenna pointing mechanism and gyroscopes to overcome the problem.

But the space agency is not confident on how long they can hold to this mode.

"We are not sure how long we will be able to sustain it. The life of Chandrayaan-I designed for two years may be reduced," Satish said.

He, however, maintained that the mission is not crippled adding, "it is continuing satisfactorily.".

Chandrayaan-I was launched from the spaceport of Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh on October 22 last year.

Offline jacqmans

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Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft completes 3000 orbits around the Moon
July 17, 2009   
 
http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Jul17_2009.htm
   
 Chandrayaan-1, India’s first mission to Moon, launched on October 22, 2008 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota, has completed eight months of successful operation and has made 3,000 revolutions around the Moon. Besides sending more than 70,000 images of the lunar surface which provide breathtaking views of lunar mountains and craters, especially craters in the permanently shadowed areas of the Moon’s polar region, Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft is also collecting valuable data pertaining to the chemical and mineral content of the Moon. Chandrayaan-1’s orbit was raised from 100 km to 200 km circular on May 19, 2009. The high orbital altitude of Chandrayaan-1 reduces the resolution of the imagery but provides a wider swath and the data is of good quality.

The onboard star sensor used for determining the orientation of the spacecraft started malfunctioning on April 26, 2009. To overcome this anomaly, ISRO devised an innovative technique of using redundant sensors – gyroscopes – along with antenna pointing information and images of specific location on the surface of the moon, for determining the orientation of the spacecraft. This method has been validated and based on this information, mission operations are being carried out satisfactorily. Other than the failure of the star sensor and one of the Bus Management Units, health of the spacecraft is normal.

Recent review by scientists has confirmed that all primary mission objectives of Chandrayaan-1 have been successfully realised during the eight months of its operation. The spacecraft continues to send high quality data as per planned sequence to its ground station at Byalalu near Bangalore. Detailed review of the scientific objectives and the performance results on the Chandrayaan-1 mission is scheduled within three months after which further operational procedures will be worked out.

It may be recalled that the primary mission of Chandrayaan-1 were:

To realise the complex spacecraft with 11 scientific instruments
To launch the spacecraft in near earth orbit and to carry out orbit raising manoeuvres of the spacecraft from 22,000 km to 3,84,000 km and place the spacecraft in a circular orbit around the moon
To place the Indian Tricolour on the moon
To carry out the imaging operation of the lunar surface and collect data on the mineral content of the lunar surface
To realise the deep space tracking network and implement the operational procedures for travel into deep space
With the successful realisation of these objectives, additional data that will be derived during the remaining part of Chandrayaan-1’s life will be complementary to already derived information.

The data collected from Chandrayaan-1 instruments have been disseminated to the Indian scientists and also the partners from Europe and USA. The scientific community is extremely happy with the already obtained data and the results of analysis could be expected in about 6 months to 1 year period.
 

Offline Svetoslav

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http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/scripts/pressreleasein.aspx?Aug29_2009

ISRO is no able to contact Chandrayaan-1, several other press sources indicate that the director of the mission has declared an end.

Offline robertross

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Too bad. Well, they accomplished quite a lot in this, their first mission to the moon, so my hat's off to them.
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline iamlucky13

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That seems like a really fast call to end the mission. I guess they're pretty confident this is the cause and there's no chance of recovery:

http://www.hindu.com/2009/08/31/stories/2009083157910100.htm

Offline robertross

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That seems like a really fast call to end the mission. I guess they're pretty confident this is the cause and there's no chance of recovery:

http://www.hindu.com/2009/08/31/stories/2009083157910100.htm

Well NASA probably has a great deal more resources to throw at a problem, and to maintain as a workforce on a project, than India does.

Bottom line is probably cost of having people stand (or sit) around doing nothing. It's unfortunate, but that's the nature of the game. Move on to the next big thing.
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline marsavian

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http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news/india/Chandrayaan-sends-images-of-Apollo-15-landing/articleshow/4964829.cms
http://www.hindu.com/seta/2009/09/03/stories/2009090350041300.htm

Scientist rubbishes Apollo 15 conspiracy theory

A Camera on board India’s maiden unmanned lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 has recorded images of the landing site of US spacecraft Apollo 15, a scientist said today, rubbishing conspiracy theories that the fourth US mission to land on the moon four decades back was a hoax.

The Terrain mapper camera (TMC) on board Chandrayaan-1, which had an abrupt end a few days back, has sent the prints of landing site of Apollo 15 and tracks of the lunar rovers used by astronauts to travel on lunar surface, a senior scientist associated with India’s lunar mission said during a presentation here.

“The images captured by hyper spectral camera fitted as a part of Chandrayaan-1 image payload has reconfirmed the veracity of Apollo 15 mission,” said Dr. Prakash Chauhan, who is a senior scientist with Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) Hyderabad-based space application centre.

Chauhan was presenting the findings of Chandrayaan-1 mission in his paper ‘Chandrayaan-1: TMC and HYSI data analysis for Apollo landing sites and ‘Mare Orientale’, which would be unveiled in public domain two months later, after further analysis.

The Chandrayaan-1 images have disproved the theory of conspiracy which had claimed that the Apollo 15 was a hoax, he said.

“Chandrayaan-1 has managed to identify the landing site used by the Apollo 15 shuttle on the basis of the disturbances on the moon’s surface,” Chauhan said.

« Last Edit: 09/03/2009 03:46 AM by marsavian »

Offline Blackstar

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http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news/india/Chandrayaan-I-was-killed-by-heat-stroke/articleshow/4979818.cms

"Chandrayaan-I was 'killed' by heat stroke
Andrew Pereira, TNN 7 September 2009, 01:12am IST
PANAJI: The reasons for early termination of the Chandrayaan-I mission are now tumbling out and they reveal that ISRO had kept the Moon orbiter's problems tightly under wraps.

Contrary to the space agency's explanation that Chandrayaan's orbit around the Moon had been raised from 100km to 200km in May this year for a better view of the Moon's surface, it is now known that this was because of a miscalculation of the Moon's temperature that had led to faulty thermal protection.

Admitting this, Dr T K Alex, director, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore, said, “We assumed that the temperature at 100km above the Moon's surface would be around 75 degrees Celsius. However, it was more than 75 degrees and problems started to surface. We had to raise the orbit to 200km.""


This isn't exactly a surprise to people involved in the program.  I've heard some griping that the Indians did not listen to some of their American counterparts who warned them about the thermal issue.  As a result, Chandrayaan-1 was not properly shielded.  Dunno if that is true.
« Last Edit: 09/07/2009 09:49 PM by Blackstar »

Offline seshagirib

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Too bad. Well, they accomplished quite a lot in this, their first mission to the moon, so my hat's off to them.

Some European scientists concur:
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news/india/Chandrayaan-1-a-fantastic-success-European-scientist/articleshow/5005806.cms

Offline jacqmans

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RELEASE: 10-055

NASA RADAR FINDS ICE DEPOSITS AT MOON'S NORTH POLE; ADDITIONAL EVIDENCE OF WATER ACTIVITY ON MOON

WASHINGTON -- Using data from a NASA radar that flew aboard India's
Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft, scientists have detected ice deposits near
the moon's north pole. NASA's Mini-SAR instrument, a lightweight,
synthetic aperture radar, found more than 40 small craters with water
ice. The craters range in size from 1 to 9 miles (2 to15 km) in
diameter. Although the total amount of ice depends on its thickness
in each crater, it's estimated there could be at least 1.3 million
pounds (600 million metric tons) of water ice.

"The emerging picture from the multiple measurements and resulting
data of the instruments on lunar missions indicates that water
creation, migration, deposition and retention are occurring on the
moon," said Paul Spudis, principal investigator of the Mini-SAR
experiment at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. "The new
discoveries show the moon is an even more interesting and attractive
scientific, exploration and operational destination than people had
previously thought."

During the past year, the Mini-SAR mapped the moon's
permanently-shadowed polar craters that aren't visible from Earth.
The radar uses the polarization properties of reflected radio waves
to characterize surface properties. Results from the mapping showed
deposits having radar characteristics similar to ice.

"After analyzing the data, our science team determined a strong
indication of water ice, a finding which will give future missions a
new target to further explore and exploit," said Jason Crusan,
program executive for the Mini-RF Program for NASA's Space Operations
Mission Directorate in Washington.

The Mini-SAR's findings are being published in the journal Geophysical
Research Letters. The results are consistent with recent findings of
other NASA instruments and add to the growing scientific
understanding of the multiple forms of water found on the moon. The
agency's Moon Mineralogy Mapper discovered water molecules in the
moon's polar regions, while water vapor was detected by NASA's Lunar
Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS.

Mini-SAR and Moon Mineralogy Mapper are two of 11 instruments on the
Indian Space Research Organization's Chandrayaan-1. The Applied
Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., performed the final integration
and testing on Mini-SAR. It was developed and built by the Naval Air
Warfare Center in China Lake, Calif., and several other commercial
and government contributors.

For more information about NASA's Mini-SAR, also known as Mini-RF,
visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/mini-rf


For more information about the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, visit:



http://m3.jpl.nasa.gov


For more information about LCROSS, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/lcross


For more information about Chandrayaan-1, visit:



http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan

Offline seshagirib

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Another Chandrayan discovery!

"Magnetic Refuge Found on Moon"

http://news.discovery.com/space/moon-magnetic-field.html

Offline Space Pete

Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline seshagirib

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http://www.siliconindia.com/shownews/ISRO_finds_cave_in_moon_can_be_used_as_base_station_for_astronauts-nid-79567.html

"
Cave in moon:Base station for astronauts?



New Delhi: Scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization have discovered a giant underground chamber on the moon, which they feel could be used as a base by astronauts on future manned missions to moon.

An analysis by an instrument on Chandrayaan-1 revealed a 1.7-km long and 120-metre wide cave near the moon's equator that is in the Oceanus Procellarum area of the moon that could be a suitable 'base station' for future human missions.
......
......
"

Offline pradeep

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Some of the Chandrayaan-I images have been posted online at http://www.issdc.gov.in. I guess they're waiting for the data policy to change in 2011 before releasing the image in full resolution, which is expected some time soon.

Pradeep

Offline Ohsin

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Hello old friend. Missed ya!  :-*

Quote
“We have been able to detect NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter [LRO] and the Indian Space Research Organization’s Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft in lunar orbit with ground-based radar,” said Marina Brozović, a radar scientist at JPL and principal investigator for the test project. “Finding LRO was relatively easy, as we were working with the mission’s navigators and had precise orbit data where it was located. Finding India’s Chandrayaan-1 required a bit more detective work because the last contact with the spacecraft was in August of 2009.”

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/new-nasa-radar-technique-finds-lost-lunar-spacecraft

Edit: May be I should've started a new thread
« Last Edit: 03/09/2017 06:28 PM by Ohsin »
"Well, three cheers to Sharma, but our real baby is INSAT."

Offline Star One

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Scientists spy new evidence of water in the Moon's interior

Quote
The research, which Milliken co-authored with Shuai Li, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii and a recent Brown Ph.D. graduate, is published in Nature Geoscience.

Detecting the water content of lunar volcanic deposits using orbital instruments is no easy task. Scientists use orbital spectrometers to measure the light that bounces off a planetary surface. By looking at which wavelengths of light are absorbed or reflected by the surface, scientists can get an idea of which minerals and other compounds are present.

The problem is that the lunar surface heats up over the course of a day, especially at the latitudes where these pyroclastic deposits are located. That means that in addition to the light reflected from the surface, the spectrometer also ends up measuring heat.

"That thermally emitted radiation happens at the same wavelengths that we need to use to look for water," Milliken said. "So in order to say with any confidence that water is present, we first need to account for and remove the thermally emitted component."

Quote
To do that, Li and Milliken used laboratory-based measurements of samples returned from the Apollo missions, combined with a detailed temperature profile of the areas of interest on the Moon's surface. Using the new thermal correction, the researchers looked at data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, an imaging spectrometer that flew aboard India's Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter.

The researchers found evidence of water in nearly all of the large pyroclastic deposits that had been previously mapped across the Moon's surface, including deposits near the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites where the water-bearing glass bead samples were collected.

https://m.phys.org/news/2017-07-scientists-spy-evidence-moon-interior.html

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