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SpaceX General Section / Re: Upcoming Talks - SpaceX Related
« Last post by vaporcobra on Today at 12:46 AM »
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Twitter Question: Should we expect you at IAC 2017 in Adelaide then?

Elon Musk reply: Yes, I postponed publishing in order to present the updated interplanetary rocket & spaceship design in Adelaide. Will be on the final day.

Might wanna add the article he retweeted for context
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SpaceX General Section / Re: Upcoming Talks - SpaceX Related
« Last post by gongora on Today at 12:43 AM »
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Twitter Question: Should we expect you at IAC 2017 in Adelaide then?

Elon Musk reply: Yes, I postponed publishing in order to present the updated interplanetary rocket & spaceship design in Adelaide. Will be on the final day.
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SpaceX General Section / Re: SpaceX for Moon Base
« Last post by Phil Stooke on Today at 12:39 AM »
"Isnt time lag actually the round trip time? Thats what is needed to actually see a response to a command. So time lag for Moon teleoperations is 2.6 seconds."

Yes... and 2.6 seconds didn't noticeably mess up Apollo communications.
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SpaceX General Section / Re: SpaceX for Moon Base
« Last post by Phil Stooke on Today at 12:37 AM »
A vertical cylinder works well too, always half illuminated whatever the solar azimuth is, and no need for motors etc.
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SpaceX General Section / Re: SpaceX for Moon Base
« Last post by CuddlyRocket on Today at 12:30 AM »
Besides water ice, the poles are the only places on the Moon where sunlight is available without interruption. Put up a tall mast and hang the arrays on it like sails, with a motor in the base to rotate the arrays continuously at 1rpM (1 revolution per Month, ha!). In 1/6 g and vacuum, the structure can be very lightweight. A really big array might be a circular arrangement of solar panels on the surface, with a 1rpM 45-degree mirror situated above.

It's probably cheaper, quicker and more reliable (no motors) to simply take up more solar cells. You can lie them on the ground and use local slopes to even things up through the lunar solar day.
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Skyrocket says
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The first Kestrel Eye satellite will be launched as a secondary payload on a Falcon-9 v1.2 launch to the ISS
Will it be released from the second stage after Dragon separates, or will it be carried in the trunk and if so, released before of after the CRS-12 stay at the ISS?
The first of those three options seems most probable, but that's just a guess.

I think it's going up as pressurized cargo and being launched through the Japanese airlock with the Kaber deployer.
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/2163.html
That's the answer.
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ISS crew assembly procedures have been prepared to guide the crew through proper and safe assembly of the NanoRacks-KE IIM. JEM airlock and MSS SPDM operations are governed by the standard operations in place for those resources. Following deployment by the NanoRacks Kaber deployer, the NanoRacks-KE IIM begins nominal mission operations limited by its orbital lifetime expected to be approximately six months.
Thanks
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Small spherical end-plate design with custom linear actuator coming along. I will be 3D printing the two main parts of the linear actuator. The rods are aluminum and the lead screw is stainless steel. There is ~1.1 cm of z axis translation.

As with the big end, I will print one quarter of the small end and cold cast 4 duplicates. As soon as the new uninterruptible power supply (UPS) charges, I will begin printing.
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John Timmer has an interesting article on Ars Technica.  Though the headline is about methane production, it appears to be easier to make carbon monoxide, which might be the way to go on, e.g., Mars.

Here's the link to the underlying paper in Nature.

Higher efficiency would be important.  There is less sunlight on Mars and we have to ship all the way from earth.  In the article it says:
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One thing that's clear is that this is an utterly abysmal way of using light energy, with a quantum yield of about 0.18 percent, meaning that only a tiny fraction of the photons supplied are used as energy to produce methane. By contrast, a lot of catalysts that split water using light produce hydrogen with a quantum efficiency over five percent.
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It's funny but when people ask whether habitable exoplanets have civilizations, it's a good question. But when a Congressman asks a question about civilization on Mars, it's a stupid question. Mars had oceans billion of years ago, so it's actually more likely to have a civilization than a "habitable" exoplanet. 

If a question like Rohrabacher's helps to debunk the beliefs of people that see stuff on Mars (because of some strange NASA images) that is a good thing.

Plus, Hillary Clinton made very bizarre comments about UFOs on Jimmy Kimmel. She seems to believe in them but nobody said anything about that.
Seeing UFOs is fine, seeing aliens is a whole n'other matter... ;) ;D
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Okay, DaveS seems to be online, but maybe not at home.

Then let's go on, friends,

of course this was reason enough to mend matters right away, which is gone, is gone!

Here one can see once again the old, but wrong rear wall (right) of the SRB shaft from the Paper kit, which is now to be exchanged by a piece from the area on its left, which is suitable very well.



Here, the two new rear wall panels are already cut out,



which were immediately tried on the "High seat", but please with greatest caution!



And that looks very well already,





and also gives a completely different picture, that I like much better.



How good that DaveS has still raised his hand, although late, but not too late.

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