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Robotic Spacecraft (Astronomy, Planetary, Earth, Solar/Heliophysics) => Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Mars 2020 Rover Section => Topic started by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 02:04 AM

Title: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 02:04 AM
LIVE UPDATE THREAD for MSL Curiosity's Post Landing (SOL 1+)events.

This is a LIVE UPDATE Thread, so please use the other threads for non updates. Non update posts will be deleted.

=--=

LEAD FEATURE ARTICLE:
Curiosity makes HISTORIC landing at Gale Crater on Mars - by Chris Gebhardt:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2012/08/msl-curiosity-historic-martian-landing-at-gale-crater/

=--=

Flow Article - by Chris Gebhardt:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2011/11/curiosityatlas-v-teams-set-weekend-launch-mars/

Launch Article - by William Graham:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2011/11/live-atlas-v-launch-nasas-msl-rover-mars/

Mars Rovers Feature Article - by Chris Gebhardt:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2012/01/opportunitys-eight-years-mars-story-science-endurance/

=--=

FORUM Resources:

MSL Dedicated Section:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=57.0

LIVE EDL EVENT THREAD:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29612.0

PARTY THREAD - All Posts Allowed:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29562.0

Pre-EDL UPDATE Thread:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=27414.0

MSL Q&A Thread:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=8183.0

=--=

L2 Section for MSL (Internal Slides, NASA people notes, HR Photos, Video):
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=tags&tags=MSL

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Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lars_J on 08/07/2012 07:34 AM
First color image from the MAHLI imager: (apparently with dust cover still attached)

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4282
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Mogster on 08/07/2012 09:58 AM
http://marsmobile.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=1

Raw stowed navcam images looking dusty. I'm starting to get concerned about the dust issue, the vehicle must be covered in it.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/07/2012 10:11 AM
Here are some processed images -looks lovely.

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/targetFamily/Mars?subselect=Mission%3AMars+Science+Laboratory+%28MSL%29%3A
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/07/2012 10:53 AM
A ver quick&dirt, but fascinating, first 360° panorama from UMSF forum:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?act=attach&type=post&id=27292
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Skamp_X on 08/07/2012 02:33 PM
Sorry but couln't resist, added colour to match pictures from MER a bit,
http://s10.postimage.org/5mhzae5s9/test2_pic.jpg

And a big congrats to NASA/JPL , been looking forward to this for a long time.  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 08/07/2012 03:31 PM
No. That will take a few weeks.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/07/2012 03:36 PM
I think Mike Malin talked about one hi-res MARDI image queued up for downlink (the one shortly after heat shield sep) so it could come today, but perhaps too late for this conference.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Herb Schaltegger on 08/07/2012 03:52 PM
http://marsmobile.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=1

Raw stowed navcam images looking dusty. I'm starting to get concerned about the dust issue, the vehicle must be covered in it.

NASA has lots of experience with dust and Martian landers. It's not anything that hasn't been considered in the design process.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/07/2012 04:14 PM
NASA has lots of experience with dust and Martian landers. It's not anything that hasn't been considered in the design process.

As marsman2020 explained in depth in another thread, it was considered, but the real extent of the issue wasn't realized (it was underestimated) until Phoenix landed, well into MSL development.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Thunderbird5 on 08/07/2012 04:25 PM
Remember also that it uses an RTU for power rather than solar so is not susceptible to power loss from dust on the panels, unlike MER.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 08/07/2012 04:31 PM
Remember also that it uses an RTU for power rather than solar so is not susceptible to power loss from dust on the panels, unlike MER.

Uuuummm that RTU rely's heavily on it's radiator to work correctly. Dust is a very good insulator. I assume they took that into account.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 08/07/2012 04:31 PM
Remember also that it uses an RTU for power rather than solar so is not susceptible to power loss from dust on the panels, unlike MER.
Actually, getting dust on the RTG radiator does significantly lower its efficiency.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: lcs on 08/07/2012 04:46 PM
Remember also that it uses an RTU for power rather than solar so is not susceptible to power loss from dust on the panels, unlike MER.
Actually, getting dust on the RTG radiator does significantly lower its efficiency.

Also if there is substantial dust on the lander then eventually the wind eddies could blow it into undesirable places compared to what you would accumulate over several years with the MERs.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/07/2012 04:51 PM
Remember also that it uses an RTU for power rather than solar so is not susceptible to power loss from dust on the panels, unlike MER.
Actually, getting dust on the RTG radiator does significantly lower its efficiency.

That is why the RTG is mounted at an angle.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/07/2012 04:59 PM
Press conference starting shortly.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:06 PM
Rover is currently asleep.

HGA deploy was successful, but is not pointed properly at Earth yet. Will change the bias to get it pointing properly tomorrow.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:06 PM
Mask deploy tomorrow.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:11 PM
MAHLI Camera engineer getting emotional about his camera being used. Nice touch.

"I've waited so long for this".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mikes on 08/07/2012 05:12 PM
MAHLI

http://www.msss.com/all_projects/msl-mahli.php
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:13 PM
Hardware on the ground!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:16 PM
Heh, thanks Mikes - I knew that...... ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:16 PM
Last one is SkyCrane.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/07/2012 05:18 PM
Damn! Look at how dark the rover is. It must be absolutely covered in dust.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/07/2012 05:19 PM
Skycrane crashed 650m from Curiosity,
back shell is 615m away,
heatshield 1200m.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:19 PM
I like this guy, so proud of his hardware. Reminds me of the orbiter guys.

Geology questions at the moment.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:23 PM
Dust covers on MAHLI are transparent covers, but has dust on it. Will be opened and closed when required (as they can be).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jeff Lerner on 08/07/2012 05:28 PM
I guess any Ballast impacts would be too small to see in those pictures ??
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: marsman2020 on 08/07/2012 05:29 PM
I don't know if I would read a lot into the stowed NavCam images.  Not being on the current team, I won't speculate as to what's going on - I don't have any more information then anyone else here in that respect.

NASA has lots of experience with dust and Martian landers. It's not anything that hasn't been considered in the design process.

As marsman2020 explained in depth in another thread, it was considered, but the real extent of the issue wasn't realized (it was underestimated) until Phoenix landed, well into MSL development.

The rover was always intended to operate in a potentially dusty environment - look at the MER rovers, they are caked. 

I guess I should elaborate just a little more - prefaced that I was "only" the person building the covers, not the one making the decision to have them.

There was one picture from Phoenix that showed a pebble on top of one of the landing leg pads, and a coating of sticky looking dust on the legs themselves.  There was also better knowledge of the flow field and resulting ground pressure from the descent stage engines at that point.  The new concern was mostly with the hardware that could be directly hit by reflected flow from the engines - and the HazCams are in the worst spot of anything, right at the belly.  An assessment was made of all the hardware on the vehicle, and as far as I am aware everything else was determined to be tolerant to the environments likely to be created during touchdown, even with the new concerns - already being designed to operate in a dusty environment.  Because of their position, the HazCams were not. So covers it was.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/07/2012 05:31 PM
I guess any Ballast impacts would be too small to see in those pictures ??
They're probably too far away to be in the picture, it was stated that they are too far away to drive to.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:31 PM
"This is the start of our mission" - for the ground team. Control Rooms are less crowed as it's late at night when they are mainly working on the rover.

North wall of Gale in that color image.

Mast cam first image will be of a calibration target and some circles (Tiers) at lower levels.

MSL sends status to a shift that starts at 11pm at night.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/07/2012 05:34 PM
The rover was always intended to operate in a potentially dusty environment - look at the MER rovers, they are caked. 

I understand that, I was talking only about the dust hazard during landing. Looking at the new MAHLI and navcam images as well as the darkness of the rover in HiRISE images, it looks like it got absolutely caked in seconds.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:38 PM
MAHLI guy getting emotional again :) Knows two of his cameras are working.

Will be adjusting the data rate for ODY and MRO - the latter will be upped to 2mb per second.

Hard to tell how much dust they have on the camera covers. Designed to be tolerant to dust. Self inspect images will tell them a lot.

Hazcam might of spotted SkyCrane crashing?! "We can't rule it out".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 05:48 PM
Mast cam might be able to spot some of the hardware if the topography is right.

Mast cam images will be tomorrow. Probably not of any terrain.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Brian Copp on 08/07/2012 05:48 PM
One of the reporters mentioned something about a test that didn't go well? What's that all about?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/07/2012 05:52 PM
One of the reporters mentioned something about a test that didn't go well? What's that all about?
It was about the REMS, I believe it didn't act exactly the way that was expected the second time it was operated. Was mentioned by Mike shorty after the presser started, but I don't remember details.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/07/2012 06:03 PM
Are there prevailing wind directions that were accounted for in choosing where to crash the descent stage.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Herb Schaltegger on 08/07/2012 06:08 PM
Are there prevailing wind directions that were accounted for in choosing where to crash the descent stage.

This was discussed in the press conferences yesterday. The main direction the science team gave to the engineering team was "away from the science." Since they are going drive the rover generally south towards the center of the crater, the descent stage was directed basically northwards.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 08/07/2012 06:18 PM
Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity Rover Post-Landing News Briefing - Sol 2 Update
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7765
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: knotnic on 08/07/2012 08:06 PM
Damn! Look at how dark the rover is. It must be absolutely covered in dust.

The HiRise image was very oblique (41 deg angle I think) and pointed at the shadowed side of the rover.  So hopefully it's not as dark as it looks. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Oberon_Command on 08/07/2012 08:12 PM
It's a slight shame that Curiosity in its landing has rather littered up the Martian landscape in the area with various bits of hardware, especially the Sky Crane with its fuel.

That shame diminishes when you remember how large Mars is in comparison to the "litter" area.

Diminishes, yes. Extinguishes, no.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/07/2012 08:14 PM
This concern about Mars' environment warms my heart and almost makes me forget how people here on Earth litter without even giving it a second thought. But since this is Mars, we really *should* keep it clean!

Seriously, I don't understand where this is coming from. Things like "you're sending *plutonium* to Mars? What if the thing crashes!?!?!"
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/07/2012 08:16 PM
Name an early exploration landing that didn't litter.  That even includes new continents and lands on earth.

Anyways, all the MSL "litter" is minor compared to MSL itself, which will be eventually abandoned and it contains plutonium.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Pheogh on 08/07/2012 08:17 PM
Mast cam might be able to spot some of the hardware if the topography is right.

Mast cam images will be tomorrow. Probably not of any terrain.

Sure would have saved a whole lot of people headaches if some smart programmer had designed a live web based activity calendar for Curiosity. Surface ops must have a calendar of some kind they are working from...? Beuller?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/07/2012 08:42 PM
Lots of non updates on a live update thread. Thread trimmed. Use the other threads.

Updates go on Update threads. It's not rocket science ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: MahFL on 08/07/2012 11:15 PM
hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2012/details/cut/hardware-longview.tif

The tif is now available, it had to be re-uploaded.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: marsman2020 on 08/08/2012 12:28 AM
A bunch more image data from Sol 0 has been posted on the raw images website - http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=0 - including the full resolution versions of some of the "covers closed" HazCam images that we all saw as downsampled versions right when the rover landed. 

I now have a much better idea of how much dust was on my covers before they opened.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/08/2012 12:53 AM
A bunch more image data from Sol 0 has been posted on the raw images website - http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=0 - including the full resolution versions of some of the "covers closed" HazCam images that we all saw as downsampled versions right when the rover landed. 

I now have a much better idea of how much dust was on my covers before they opened.

So many (if not everyone) here are so happy you put those covers on!

Must give you that warm fuzzy feeling  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Rocket Science on 08/08/2012 01:02 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5YtXtp5WAc&feature=relmfu
Best laugh I had all day…  20:10

Q: What could be responsible for the walnut sized little pieces of rocks?

A: Squirrels… Funny Ken  ;D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 08/08/2012 01:22 AM
Incredibly cool that they were able to spot all the EDL hardware so quickly.

Pictures are up now.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/08/2012 01:42 AM
"away from the science."
Gale Crater was formed at least in part by wind. Hopefully aerosolized hydrazine was not transported to instruments.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 08/08/2012 01:49 AM
Did I miss it, or hasn't anyone posted that MRO also managed to capture the heat shield dropping away from MSL?

http://www.uahirise.org/images/2012/details/cut/msl_parachute_heatshield.jpg

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: FOXP2 on 08/08/2012 03:58 AM
"away from the science."
Gale Crater was formed at least in part by wind. Hopefully aerosolized hydrazine was not transported to instruments.

I'm confused, was the sky-crane, once it flies off, not designed to burn its tanks dry?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/08/2012 07:19 AM

No, the flyaway burn was fixed duration, not to depletion.

Could it have happened that the tank content exploded upon impact?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 07:34 AM
Could it have happened that the tank content exploded upon impact?

Over at UMSF (http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=7401&view=findpost&p=187555), at least one apparently secondary impact pointing back to the descent stage impact was identified in the HiRISE image. This suggests that at least some components of the descent stage didn't go peacefully. What's more, the distance the secondary piece travelled is more than the distance to the rover!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 07:37 AM
A bunch more image data from Sol 0 has been posted on the raw images website - http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=0 - including the full resolution versions of some of the "covers closed" HazCam images that we all saw as downsampled versions right when the rover landed. 

Also one MARDI full resolution frame was downlinked - http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000072E1_DXXX.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 07:48 AM
The mast is up, navcam image of the deck. The rover and the optics seem to be pretty clear of dust.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/08/2012 07:57 AM
The mast is up, navcam image of the deck. The rover and the optics seem to be pretty clear of dust.

Thanks for posting! Wow! Even the wheel seems to be totally clean.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/08/2012 08:11 AM
The mast is up, navcam image of the deck.

Was that pic relayed or did it come directly from the rover's high gain antenna?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 08:34 AM
No idea.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/08/2012 10:12 AM
Pictures are starting to flow.

Mountains

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00002/opgs/edr/ncam/NLA_397681339EDR_F0020000AUT_04096M_.JPG
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: MarsInMyLifetime on 08/08/2012 10:14 AM
Note the thruster impingement points. Very cool.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Silmfeanor on 08/08/2012 10:42 AM
 :o
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: douglas100 on 08/08/2012 10:45 AM
Love the 2 navcam pics, especially the way the rim mountains become hazy in the distance.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: saturnapollo on 08/08/2012 11:00 AM
Brilliant photos. Been waiting a long time to see Martian mountains.

Here's the two again, but brightened a bit.

Keith

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevinof on 08/08/2012 11:06 AM
Very little dust visible on Curiosity.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 11:08 AM
Very little dust visible on Curiosity.

Correction: very little coarse-grained stuff seen on Curiosity. It might still be covered with a thin film of fine, orangish dust, and to figure that out we'll have to wait for color images.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 08/08/2012 01:50 PM
Could it have happened that the tank content exploded upon impact?

Over at UMSF (http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=7401&view=findpost&p=187555), at least one apparently secondary impact pointing back to the descent stage impact was identified in the HiRISE image. This suggests that at least some components of the descent stage didn't go peacefully. What's more, the distance the secondary piece travelled is more than the distance to the rover!

The discussion has since evolved into it looks like the rear(?) hazcam caught the dust cloud the skycrane kicked up on impact.

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=7401&view=findpost&p=187592
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 02:03 PM
Yes, that was speculated almost immediately since two separate sets of rear hazcam images were received - one with covers on immediately after landing, showing *something* in both left and right images, and one with covers off showing nothing there later.

The question was raised during yesterday's presser and it wasn't ruled out, in fact it looks very plausible.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mduncan36 on 08/08/2012 02:43 PM
I know how cliched it is to say this but I can't get over the resemblance of these photos to some of my own taken in a dry area of Lake Meade outside Las Vegas. Surely MRO would have spotted a neon city on the other side of those hills, right? Thoughts like that really make you ponder what that site looked like in the ancient past and what might be there that we aren't seeing yet. Which is the alien landscape? Earth or Mars?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Archibald on 08/08/2012 02:54 PM
Brilliant photos. Been waiting a long time to see Martian mountains.

Here's the two again, but brightened a bit.

Keith



These martians mountains /
Are a home now for me /
But my home is the lowlands /
And always will be /
...
Brothers in Mars ?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 03:24 PM
The mast is up, navcam image of the deck. The rover and the optics seem to be pretty clear of dust.

That's wonderful. And a tip, that only just showed up on the @MarsCuriosity twitter feed, so that feed is a very slow one.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/08/2012 03:37 PM
Grab your 3D glasses for this view of Curiosity's landscape on Mars
Posted By Emily Lakdawalla

2012/08/08 09:58 CDT

Curiosity fired up her Navigational Cameras on Sol 2 and began to take a look around her. The first four full-resolution frames are enough for a small 3D panorama that shows a lovely landscape. I think we're going to like it here!

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/08080751-curiosity-first-navcam-pan-3d.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 04:09 PM
Epic 3D-ness, and not to detract from live updates (there's a presser in less than an hour), but I wonder if there's commonality with the 3D camera on MSL with the Shuttle OBSS camera suite? OR if they are processed into 3D on the ground?

Ref:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2011/05/endeavour-completes-historic-final-undocking-tps-clearance-overview/ (includes 3D image of a TPS damage area).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/08/2012 04:43 PM
Epic 3D-ness, and not to detract from live updates (there's a presser in less than an hour), but I wonder if there's commonality with the 3D camera on MSL with the Shuttle OBSS camera suite? OR if they are processed into 3D on the ground?


None, there are just multiple cameras and they can be combined on the ground. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 04:49 PM
And they are of MER heritage.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:02 PM
Lowering numbers of journalists at the pressers.

All antennas and links working perfectly.

100mb of data on the last MRO pass.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/08/2012 05:03 PM
Presser started with Jennifer Trosper, Justin Maki, John Grotzinger, Mike Malin, Don Hassler.

High gain session works, all links work perfectly now. Mastcam pointed away from the sun.

REMS issues understood and cleared.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:03 PM
REMS working. Mast deployed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:06 PM
Planning Sol 3 now.

Will do a mast cam 360 degree pano.

Four Sols (5-9) for the software transition. Will be sent up on the HGA.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/08/2012 05:07 PM
RTG genereating 115 Watts, more power than expected. Gale is a little warmer than prediction, no issues.

MSL rover Azimuth is updated by a degree, verified by mastcam.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jcm on 08/08/2012 05:07 PM

Used Mastcam image to update the HGA azimuth
Nice to see Trosper again, I remember she was impressive on MPF
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:10 PM
Current config.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:11 PM
Full res versions coming down in a day or two.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:12 PM
A couple of frames of the 360 degree pano.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:14 PM
Heh. Hat tip to conspiracy theorists! Saying people might think NASA is pulling a fast one and that they put a rover out in the mojave desert. :D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:16 PM
SkyCrane provided some free trenching with the thruster inpingments.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/08/2012 05:16 PM
Skycrane plume uncovered bedrock!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/08/2012 05:19 PM
Found some more vehicle pieces, 6 impact spots in a row! Balance masses anyone?  :D

12 km downrange from rover, 1km dispersal.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 05:19 PM
6 tungsten ballast impact point imaged!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:20 PM
Ballast masses spotted in Gale.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jcm on 08/08/2012 05:21 PM
Six entry balance mass devices spotted by MRO
(two Cruise Balance mass devices not seen yet I guess)
EMBD jettisoned relatively low about 20 km or so; CMBD jettisoned out in space so I'm really curious how they fared
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:21 PM
Cool animation of the aeroshell coming off.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jeff Lerner on 08/08/2012 05:22 PM
Full res versions coming down in a day or two.

Wow...is the contrast right on the picture of Curiosity ??....doesn't look white any more ....???
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:22 PM
Full res of the aeroshell
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:24 PM
Pebbles.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:25 PM
MSL location.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:28 PM
Radiation chat.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:29 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/08/2012 05:30 PM
First measurements yesterday by RAD. Mast was still down and partially obstructing field of view during first measurements.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jeff Lerner on 08/08/2012 05:30 PM
Radiation chat.

Chris, any characterization of what this level of radiation would mean for an astronaut on Mars ???...probablly too early to comment...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/08/2012 05:36 PM
Bedrock is pretty high up to be the floor of the crater. Guess is that it is a "rock" that formed some time after the crater. Do not know how hard the rock is, so rock in quotation marks.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Carreidas 160 on 08/08/2012 05:37 PM
Heh. Hat tip to conspiracy theorists! Saying people might think NASA is pulling a fast one and that they put a rover out in the mojave desert. :D

I was going to suggest the same :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:37 PM
The SkyCrane "crater".

This mission has seemingly moved on to the "it's a rock" phase.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:41 PM
Radiation chat.

Chris, any characterization of what this level of radiation would mean for an astronaut on Mars ???...probablly too early to comment...

Leo just asked that question!

Answer is it's complex and one of the more interesting questions. RAD will help design the shielding for HSF Mars missions.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:45 PM
More notes that this landscape looks a lot like Earth, "it feels comfortable"
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jcm on 08/08/2012 05:46 PM
Kelly Beatty fronting for me asking the entry timeline question :-) Thanks Kelly
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jeff Lerner on 08/08/2012 05:46 PM
Bedrock is pretty high up to be the floor of the crater. Guess is that it is a "rock" that formed some time after the crater. Do not know how hard the rock is, so rock in quotation marks.

One thing I've noticed from these early pictures is that the rover's wheels did not seem to sink into the surface at all...implies to me that the surface where MSL landed is quite hard....no dunes in sight a la MERs
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:47 PM
The ballast impacts are far away (and across a dune field they don't want to cross). So unlikely to check out those new holes.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Kaputnik on 08/08/2012 05:47 PM
Sounds like the ballast impacts will not be investigated- would have to traverse the dune field, and travel across areas where the stratigraphy is obscured.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/08/2012 05:52 PM
Touchdown time: 05:17:57 UTC
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jcm on 08/08/2012 05:53 PM
And the answer is 0517:57 UTC SCET, so the value we thought we heard on the SOL 0 thread (0514:39) was something else.
This is much more consistent with the expected timeline.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/08/2012 05:56 PM
So there will be that animation of landing in hi res in a day or so I believe!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Rocket Guy on 08/08/2012 05:57 PM
It wasn't heard wrong, that's what they said the other day (14:39). They have finally corrected it after being asked to, but not explained why they had it wrong.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/08/2012 06:03 PM
Radiation chat.

Chris, any characterization of what this level of radiation would mean for an astronaut on Mars ???...probablly too early to comment...

Leo just asked that question!

Answer is it's complex and one of the more interesting questions. RAD will help design the shielding for HSF Mars missions.
Looking at the graph though average radiation looks about half that of cruise- which is at least what one would expect from having a planet blocking half of the sky. Those peaks show that shielding of some kind is likely still required.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jeff Lerner on 08/08/2012 06:09 PM
Radiation chat.

Chris, any characterization of what this level of radiation would mean for an astronaut on Mars ???...probablly too early to comment...

Leo just asked that question!

Answer is it's complex and one of the more interesting questions. RAD will help design the shielding for HSF Mars missions.
Looking at the graph though average radiation looks about half that of cruise- which is at least what one would expect from having a planet blocking half of the sky. Those peaks show that shielding of some kind is likely still required.




So can we now cross off "unreasonable" radation levels on Mars for humans off the Mars Risk list ???...I believe that was one of the major unknowns......
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jcm on 08/08/2012 06:11 PM
It wasn't heard wrong, that's what they said the other day (14:39). They have finally corrected it after being asked to, but not explained why they had it wrong.

I'd have to listen to it again.
They said something was 1014:39 but maybe it wasn't rover touchdown
or maybe it wasn't PDT but some uncorrected telemetry counter value?

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 08/08/2012 06:12 PM
So can we now cross off "unreasonable" radation levels on Mars for humans off the Mars Risk list ???...I believe that was one of the major unknowns......

I'd be cautious crossing anything off the list if all we have is less than a week's worth of uncalibrated data.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/08/2012 06:12 PM
Great view of the heatshield falling away, another full res frame that was downloaded from MARDI:
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Blackstar on 08/08/2012 06:13 PM
So can we now cross off "unreasonable" radation levels on Mars for humans off the Mars Risk list ???...I believe that was one of the major unknowns......

I'd be cautious crossing anything off the list if all we have is less than a week's worth of uncalibrated data.

Yes. Wait for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jnc on 08/08/2012 06:13 PM
The SkyCrane "crater".

Just to make sure I understand, this is one of the exhaust-dug holes near the rover, not the impact crater, right?

Noel
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 08/08/2012 06:14 PM
Yes.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Rocket Guy on 08/08/2012 06:14 PM
It wasn't heard wrong, that's what they said the other day (14:39). They have finally corrected it after being asked to, but not explained why they had it wrong.

I'd have to listen to it again.
They said something was 1014:39 but maybe it wasn't rover touchdown
or maybe it wasn't PDT but some uncorrected telemetry counter value?



They stated touchdown Mars time was 10:14:39, leading to lots of chatter about whether it was three minutes early, there was bad info, and other news sites reporting "10:39" as well. I believe the reporter asked today because they still hadn't clarified.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Pheogh on 08/08/2012 06:20 PM
I would love to know how the telemetry reconstruction is going and especially to actually see a sim of it. Anyone have any news about this?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm Hartnett on 08/08/2012 06:29 PM
http://www.db-prods.net/blog/2012/08/08/premiere-carte-postale-en-provenance-de-gale-sol-2/

A wallpaper/postcard from one of the good folks at unmannedspaceflight.com

Edit: click on the photo
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ArbitraryConstant on 08/08/2012 07:19 PM
Anyone have any news about this?
The one thing I caught from mission control during EDL was that when the heat shield popped, the radar velocity correction was 0.7 meters per second. I assume guidance until then was purely inertial.

Not my field, but that seems insanely good to me. They can probably work backwards from the initial radar fix and get very good position numbers all the way back to whenever they last got a fix from Earth.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: asdyt on 08/08/2012 07:45 PM
http://www.db-prods.net/blog/2012/08/08/premiere-carte-postale-en-provenance-de-gale-sol-2/

A wallpaper/postcard from one of the good folks at unmannedspaceflight.com
Here's a colourised version. It's just like being there.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 08/08/2012 07:50 PM
Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity Rover Post-Landing News Briefing - Sol 3 Update
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7770
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: go4mars on 08/08/2012 08:00 PM
Looks like a deflation lag to me (where it landed). 
Also, I'm not a rocketry expert, but am surprised that the plumes had such a focussed effect on the ground so far below through near-vacuum.  I figured the plumes would be more dispersed than that at that distance...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/08/2012 08:21 PM
Great view of the heatshield falling away, another full res frame that was downloaded from MARDI:

Super fantastic!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jcm on 08/08/2012 08:36 PM
It wasn't heard wrong, that's what they said the other day (14:39). They have finally corrected it after being asked to, but not explained why they had it wrong.

I'd have to listen to it again.
They said something was 1014:39 but maybe it wasn't rover touchdown
or maybe it wasn't PDT but some uncorrected telemetry counter value?



They stated touchdown Mars time was 10:14:39, leading to lots of chatter about whether it was three minutes early, there was bad info, and other news sites reporting "10:39" as well. I believe the reporter asked today because they still hadn't clarified.

Yes, the reporter asked today because I emailed him just before the press conference :-)  - we go back a ways
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/08/2012 08:49 PM
So can we now cross off "unreasonable" radation levels on Mars for humans off the Mars Risk list ???...I believe that was one of the major unknowns......

The first graph isn't RAD data. It's sunspot counts for the last decade. The second graph (link (http://"http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4338") is an uncalibrated plot and has no units. It doesn't tell us much so far.

But the radiation environment has already been predicted through some fairly thorough analysis. It was not a complete unknown. We know it's quite a bit worse than earth - about 1,000 times the cosmic ray exposure, and I think about 100-200 times the total surface background exposure from all sources. This is the average rate, and it can jump significantly due to solar activity, so even though astronauts are allowed to receive up to about 75 times the annual exposure rate they would on the ground, you actually need more shielding than just what it would take to get your from 100x to 75x exposure. Mission design is for peak exposure, not average exposure.

I don't have a complete picture of the past dose assessments, but they generally seem amount to that the amount of shielding necessary is for the most part reasonable, but there is a moderate chance that a major solar flare can push the amount of shielding required to impractical levels.

The RAD data will show how well those predictions stand up to measurements, and provide a more confident basis for understanding how much protection astronauts actually need and what their total mission dosage would be.

In other words, excess radiation exposure is still considered a real risk, and the RAD instrument will likely confirm that. Note that this is primarily in the form of increased lifetime cancer risk. It should quite reasonably be possible to keep the exposure rate below what would cause radiation sickness, which would be a definitely unacceptable case.

Changing topics, here's a very roughly merged self-portrait mosaic from the navcam thumbnails:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4346
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 08/08/2012 09:05 PM
Comparing Mars surface radiation levels and Earth surface radiation levels isn't terribly helpful, and makes the situation seem worse than it is. There are places on Earth where people live long, healthy lives that have natural radiation levels comparable to low altitude areas of Mars.

Compare the levels of ISS and Mars surface. They are about the same in many places, and in places that are easiest to get to EDL-wise, (i.e. lower altitude), the radiation levels are significantly lower than ISS levels.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 08/09/2012 12:02 AM
What I liked from today's presser at 25:20 was that it's basically set that the rover is safe to drive.  No obstacles nearby to worry about.

A drive to one of the thruster craters is probably first.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: marsman2020 on 08/09/2012 07:56 AM
A bunch more full resolution NavCam images from Sol 2 are now posted in the raw images section.

I couldn't help myself, I stitched a few of them together to make this.  I also spotted a few other bits of hardware that I worked on in addition to the dust covers.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/09/2012 07:58 AM
Great work, marsman! Looks like there is some grain on the deck
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/09/2012 08:03 AM
What was in these white "trays" that you can see just a little left of the center of the image?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/09/2012 08:34 AM
What was in these white "trays" that you can see just a little left of the center of the image?

I'd say that's where the cameras were tucked in while the mast was stowed.

Also: http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/08082211-curiosity-sol-2-navcam-full-frame-mardi.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/09/2012 11:27 AM
A bunch more full resolution NavCam images from Sol 2 are now posted in the raw images section.

I couldn't help myself, I stitched a few of them together to make this. 
very nice, thanks

Quote
I also spotted a few other bits of hardware that I worked on in addition to the dust covers.


Please, do tell!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/09/2012 03:25 PM
Heads up that I can't be around at the time of this next presser, so if everyone could chip in.... thanks!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 05:02 PM
Presser starting
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/09/2012 05:03 PM
Presser started with Mike Watkins, Mike Malin, Dawn Sumner, Andy Mishkin, Doug Ellison.

MSL behaves flawlessly, the team too.

New software load starting day after tomorrow. Prepping today.

Checked out a number of instruments(didn't get which ones), all was nominal.

Took first 360 degree panorama in color.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 05:07 PM
Dust on the deck
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/09/2012 05:13 PM
Sharpened HiRISE image with noise removed
http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2012/details/cut/MSL_EDL_sharp.tif
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 05:14 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/09/2012 05:14 PM
Main target (base of Mount Sharp) area is visible in navcam images. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 05:15 PM
Curiosity is here
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/09/2012 05:16 PM
1 cm across for largest particles, possibly 'lighter than expected'.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 05:18 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/09/2012 05:19 PM
Predicted touchdown was 0.6 seconds off from actual touchdown.  :o :o
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/09/2012 05:23 PM
Doug Ellison promoting http://eyes.nasa.gov/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/09/2012 05:28 PM
Curiosity Rover ‏@MarsCuriosity

Area 51? No, Quad 51 is where I landed on Mars. Here's a map of Gale crater. (PS - I come in peace) #MSL http://twitpic.com/ahdtkg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 05:28 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/09/2012 05:32 PM
Color panorama: low exposure, no saturation, raw color. Human eye can distinguish 1000 colors, 60 gray scale.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/09/2012 05:36 PM
Keith Cowling > Doug Ellison > Augmented Reality apps for iPhone on the way (?).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/09/2012 05:38 PM
All instruments are working to some degree, checked at least that "power is flowing".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/09/2012 05:43 PM
Adaptive data rates peak at 2mbps at lowest airmass.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/09/2012 05:47 PM
Fight software transition on sol 5, 6, 7, 8. Standing down on science during transition.

End of presser.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/09/2012 05:50 PM
Dawn Sumner team eager to use laser on material exposed from landing.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/09/2012 05:59 PM
Great work Gents, and Doug at the presser!! Awesome for him! :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dappa on 08/09/2012 06:05 PM
Curiosity Rover ‏@MarsCuriosity

Gale Crater Vista, in Glorious Color! Get a low-res preview of the 360-panorama to come [pic] http://1.usa.gov/MCkZ2x #MSL
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 06:09 PM
More images from the briefing
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 06:14 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/09/2012 06:17 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 08/09/2012 08:25 PM
Great images, you can really see where the Sky Crane has dug down into the bedrock with its rocket boosters in them.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/09/2012 08:54 PM
Predicted touchdown was 0.6 seconds off from actual touchdown.  :o :o

Phenomenal!

Great work on the presser guys.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jnc on 08/09/2012 08:55 PM
Phenominal!

I take it the mis-spelling there was deliberate? (Nice one, if so!)

Noel

PS: Argh! You changed it! So it was an accident after all? I thought it was a play on the 'everything nominal' NASA jargon. It was really cute/clever!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/09/2012 09:56 PM
Doug Ellison promoting http://eyes.nasa.gov/

That's awesome. If R2D2 has inappropriate dreams, that website is what they look like.

I'm serious, if anybody on NSF does not check this out, Optimus Prime will personally come to your house and revoke your nerd badge.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: BrightLight on 08/09/2012 10:35 PM
I wonder what the blue stuff is - maybe algae  ;D
did i write that - opps, follow the water...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: clongton on 08/10/2012 01:56 AM
Dust on the deck

I totally love the pictures and panoramas, but I'm really surprised that the designers didn't include *some* kind of directed blower to remove accumulating dust on occasion. It's not like we haven't had to deal with Martian dust before. Everybody knows it *can* be a problem. And Curiosity, being nuclear powered, is not lacking in electrical ability to power the device. The last lander had to depend on being hit by a Martian dust devil to clear the solar panels for crying out loud. After spending all that money and expending all that time, let's not leave our landers at the whim of Martian weather to remain operational. I really don't want to read on here in a year or 2 that a perfectly good rover has become useless because of accumulating dust.  Future lander developers, please take note.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/10/2012 02:06 AM
Dust on the deck

I totally love the pictures and panoramas, but I'm really surprised that the designers didn't include *some* kind of directed blower to remove accumulating dust on occasion. It's not like we haven't had to deal with Martian dust before. Everybody knows it *can* be a problem. And Curiosity, being nuclear powered, is not lacking in electrical ability to power the device. The last lander had to depend on being hit by a Martian dust devil to clear the solar panels for crying out loud. After spending all that money and expending all that time, let's not leave our landers at the whim of Martian weather to remain operational. I really don't want to read on here in a year or 2 that a perfectly good rover has become useless because of accumulating dust.  Future lander developers, please take note.

Because it is not problem

It is not an issue for MSL and not worth the weight.  MSL is designed for a 2 years mission.

It also was not an issue for MER, they were only designed for 90 day missions.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: thomson on 08/10/2012 02:11 AM
I've missed yesterday daily press conference. Are they archived somewhere? I tied to find them on mars.jpl.nasa.gov, but they are not there in multimedia nor news sections.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: rdale on 08/10/2012 02:19 AM
YouTube and John44. Links in each daily thread.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 02:27 AM
YouTube and John44. Links in each daily thread.

Here's John44's SOL4 conference link

http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7773:mars-science-laboratorycuriosity-rover-post-landing-news-briefing-sol-4-update&catid=1:latest
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/10/2012 09:09 AM
I'm getting concerned that there are no sol3 raw images on the jpl site. Is there a problem?

http://marsmobile.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/10/2012 09:30 AM
No, there isn't, they just haven't posted any sol 3 images there. It's been obvious from sol 1 or 2 that the MARDI and Mastcam images show up in the press conferences before they hit the raw page. The color panorama released yesterday in particular was downlinked sol 3 so there's no problem with the rover.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/10/2012 09:37 AM
Does it mean that the Curiosity team will follow a different policy than Spirit, Oppy and Phoenix about how they handle the data? It would be a great disappointment if this is the case.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/10/2012 10:25 AM
Curiosity Rover ‏@MarsCuriosity

Area 51? No, Quad 51 is where I landed on Mars. Here's a map of Gale crater. (PS - I come in peace) #MSL http://twitpic.com/ahdtkg
I want to go there:
(http://img808.imageshack.us/img808/1060/villaggiomarziano.jpg)

Where do I find the hires version?

Keith Cowling > Doug Ellison > Augmented Reality apps for iPhone on the way (?).
Here?
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mobile/info/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/10/2012 11:17 AM
Does it mean that the Curiosity team will follow a different policy than Spirit, Oppy and Phoenix about how they handle the data? It would be a great disappointment if this is the case.

Too early to tell. I'm still willing to chalk this up to the raw page not being their number one priority right now. Although to be frank, the raw page looks like something that was cobbled up at the last minute and yet they had months if not years to lay the groundwork for it.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/10/2012 11:19 AM
Oh yeah. I had some trouble with downloading raw photos initially.

I would personally be happy even with regularly given Engineering camera images only, but pancam frames would be nice.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/10/2012 11:20 AM
No, there isn't, they just haven't posted any sol 3 images there. It's been obvious from sol 1 or 2 that the MARDI and Mastcam images show up in the press conferences before they hit the raw page. The color panorama released yesterday in particular was downlinked sol 3 so there's no problem with the rover.
But they said during the sol3 press conference that the images are to be posted as soon as they get them (they said that in response to a question about finding something obviously biological such as stromatolites.)
If they are holding back for press conferences then that is disappointing as that is a lousy way to engage the public ( most of whom won't watch te press conferences). It is very different than pathfinder and mer. Also - what is the procedure for sol 58 etc when here won't be a daily press conference.

As this is an update thread I don't want to derail with endless opinion - but I do want to understand when we should expect image updates and where they will be posted. 
Also, does anyone know what te downlink times are for say the next week either direct from the rover or via relay satellite ?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/10/2012 11:31 AM
According to Emily's blog tomorrow they start uploading software for surface operations - a procedure that will take minimum 4 sols. No science data during this time.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/10/2012 11:43 AM
According to Emily's blog tomorrow they start uploading software for surface operations - a procedure that will take minimum 4 sols. No science data during this time.
Could you please provide a link to that blog?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/10/2012 11:45 AM
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/08091249-curiosity-sol-3-mastcam-pan.html

During tonight and tomorrow's communications passes, sol 4, they should get a few of the full-resolution frames down from Mars. But only 10 or 20 will make it down before they begin the big flight software upgrade on sol 5. That effort will take at least 4 sols, and no science data will be returned during that time. So it'll be some time -- at least a week, more like two -- before the whole thing is available in full resolution. Even then, it won't include the top of the mountain.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hyper_snyper on 08/10/2012 11:52 AM
According to Emily's blog tomorrow they start uploading software for surface operations - a procedure that will take minimum 4 sols. No science data during this time.
Could you please provide a link to that blog?

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Svetoslav on 08/10/2012 11:54 AM
Oh, and by the way...

The images are up :

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=3

:)

So good news everyone!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/10/2012 12:08 PM
Oh, and by the way...

The images are up :

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=3

:)

So good news everyone!

Nice. Hmm. Nothing new since press conference.
Thumbnails again....
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/10/2012 12:08 PM
Text from the "raw" page:

"Curiosity just sent back raw images for Sol 3! (A Sol is Martian Day.) The rover is now performing activities requested by the science team for Sol 4. Curiosity will send back images and other data based on these commands on Sol 4. Curiosity stores any data not transmitted onboard. The rover will send back this data on later Sols according to the mission team's priorities. That means these pages update whenever data comes back. Images are filed in the Sol the rover took the picture, not the Sol on which the rover sent the image back to Earth. Check back frequently for more discoveries from Mars! "
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/10/2012 12:29 PM
I've missed yesterday daily press conference. Are they archived somewhere?
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_tag&task=tag&tag=msl

Dust on the deck

I totally love the pictures and panoramas, but I'm really surprised that the designers didn't include *some* kind of directed blower to remove accumulating dust on occasion.
An obliquous rather than flat surface would do the same at no energy cost. :-) Why have rovers to be flat and horizontal?!?

Does it mean that the Curiosity team will follow a different policy than Spirit, Oppy and Phoenix about how they handle the data? It would be a great disappointment if this is the case.
They're adding full resolution of MARDI frames to SOL 0 page:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=0
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: corrodedNut on 08/10/2012 12:39 PM
They're adding full resolution of MARDI frames to SOL 0 page:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=0

And they've made a new decent video from them, "Curiosity Bids Goodbye to Heat Shield": http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/videos/index.cfm?v=65

Also, "Up, Down and All Around Curiosity":
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/videos/index.cfm?v=66

I find their Youtube page a bit more user-friendly than the JPL Video Archive

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ec1KNoDly14&list=UUZZl9m3dGpm2teFlrImny-Q&index=2&feature=plcp

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5aOQAWodxs&list=UUZZl9m3dGpm2teFlrImny-Q&index=1&feature=plcp

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Gary NASA on 08/10/2012 12:45 PM
According to Emily's blog tomorrow they start uploading software for surface operations - a procedure that will take minimum 4 sols. No science data during this time.

We knew this days ago, if you had taken the time to read the 12 pages of this thread.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/10/2012 01:59 PM

An obliquous rather than flat surface would do the same at no energy cost. :-) Why have rovers to be flat and horizontal?!?


For packaging.  It is not an issue for the chassis, so no need for unconventional design  Also, the MMRTG is at an angle for that very purpose.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/10/2012 02:13 PM
Are we going there? IT's just between us and Mount Sharp!
(http://jumpjack.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/3d-psp_009149009294-anim.gif)

Details:
http://jumpjack.wordpress.com/2012/08/10/un-paio-di-posti-interessanti-da-andare-a-vedere-su-marte/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 08/10/2012 03:18 PM
Are we going there? IT's just between us and Mount Sharp!

<obvious>I dunno, the ground looks too shaky</obvious>
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 08/10/2012 03:37 PM
Thanks, Jumpjack!

I love those GIFs, they give a great perspective.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/10/2012 04:01 PM
Is there already a plenned course for Curiosity?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/10/2012 04:43 PM
More information about data handling in this article

""NASA wanted to ensure that this thrilling experience was shared with fans across the globe by providing up-to-the-minute details of the mission," according to a case study AWS released to illustrate the project's technical accomplishments. With hundreds of thousands of concurrent visitors anticipated during traffic peaks, the case study asserts that "availability, scalability, and performance of the [site] was of the utmost essence."

 It also says that prior to AWS implementation, NASA/JPL did not possess the requisite Web and live streaming infrastructure to push hundreds of gigabits of content per second to the legions of site users.

"The public gets access as soon as we have access," Khawaja Shams, manager of data services for tactical operations at JPL, said in an interview. "All the images that come from Mars are processed in the cloud environment before they're disseminated." Services from Amazon "allows us to leverage multiple machines to do actual processing."

http://www.informationweek.com/government/cloud-saas/nasa-mars-mission-fueled-by-amazon-web-s/240005286
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 04:52 PM
Next presser coming up in 10 mins.

Also, heads up to L2 members to download this 650mb video of the dual screen live GUI data and live control room video from another JPL room of the EDL! Epic.
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29674.0
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/10/2012 04:56 PM
Also, from Washington Post:

"While Curiosity continues to collect data on Mars, here on Earth the team that got her there continues to receive questions and accolades from the science community and general public. Members of the team will be joining us Friday for a Google Hangout at 2:30 p.m. ET; among them Tracy Neilson, head of the rover’s fault protection team; Steve Collins, a member of the attitude control systems team; Martin Greco, one of two leads on the entry, descent and landing activity team and mission controller Bobak Ferdowsi."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/innovations/post/nasa-curiosity-crew-members-are-hanging-out-with-us-today-230-pm-et/2012/08/10/c2faf4e2-e2f4-11e1-98e7-89d659f9c106_blog.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 04:57 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:00 PM
STarting
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:01 PM
EDL team and software team leading.

The cool Adam S!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:03 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:03 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:03 PM
Jody Davis - wow.

EDL team get a round of applause.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:05 PM
weather at landing: beat sand storms
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:08 PM
Entry parameters were almost spot on, including one parameter estimated over a million miles from Mars. Was a clear and cold day during landing.

There's recorded EDL data (100MB) on MSL to be sent back. Only have 1mb of data on EDL so far.

Got more coverage than expected from MRO. 1MB of data from MRO and ODY.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:08 PM
updated landing & descent times
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/10/2012 05:09 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:09 PM
landing zone history
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/10/2012 05:11 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:11 PM
discussing tungsten ballasts to adjust/trim trajectory
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:14 PM
Pulled a little over 11 Gs

3 bank reversals (last one right at the end of range control, so ended up 1 mile higher which caused the error seen at lading)  (~ 1 mile off previously noted)

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:14 PM
Notes about how previous missions added a lot of knowledge to MSL's EDL.

Slightly off the landing site was to do with the third bank reversal, where the vehicle climbed a bit. Could have also been related to tail winds.

Notes about the history of JSC's involvement with landings.

"I've been trying to find something interesting to talk about apart from the small miss distance, but I can't".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/10/2012 05:17 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:21 PM
Kevin Kipp

Talking about parachute, the vent to let air escape

No tearing visible

Perfectly functioning

Also reviewed against entry timeline
259 sec after entry (based on 241 to 263 sec predicted window)

Took 20 sec to deccelerate down to Mach 0.7

Parachute Separation happened 95 sec after heat shield separation (from a 60-150 sec range)

(this all based on limited data available that they inferred)

Talking about oscillations of the capsule below the parachute, and trying to limit it. "Risk Mode". Turned out to be benign from the thumbnail video replay previously seen of heat shield falling away.

Radar beams measuring the ground can be affected by the oscillations, which were minimized

1-2 deg/sec capsule rotation during descent under the capsule (figured up to 3 deg/sec)

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:22 PM
Parachute guy is happy with his parameters. Based on limited data.

Wrist mode (the wobble under parachute) can be seen in that video shown a few days ago. Shows wrist mode was small - 1 to 2 degrees of rotation.

Wanted to get the heatshield away as far as possible so as not to cause radar problems. Photos show that was all good.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:23 PM
From the image of the capsule descending,

the heat shield is actually 15m away and this was after 3 seconds
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/10/2012 05:23 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:24 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:25 PM
Possible image of descent stage impact

edit: ~600m away

~ 100 mph

taken from rear Hazcam
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:25 PM
Looks like they've photoed the SkyCrane impact!

Notes the two impact spots "We created those with our rocket engines!"

Thinks the debris on the rover is pretty cool too.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:27 PM
Image taken from direction shown

Taling about divot in the ground caused by the decsent stage

debris kicked up that landed on the top of the rover (pretty cool)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:29 PM
Google Mars of landing! I want to play with this!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/10/2012 05:30 PM
Google Mars banking reversals. They're getting good at these visualizations.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:30 PM
Jody Davis

Talking about how they used Google Mars
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:31 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:31 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:31 PM
(para): "Google even put an American flug at the landing spot for our rover"

edit to add image capture of American Flag
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:32 PM
landing location diagrams
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:33 PM
Only missed the landing target by 1.5 miles.

The estimation and actual landing sport are just 200m apart.

The ballast landed where they expected.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/10/2012 05:34 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:35 PM
What we are doing next:

To jetison flight software
(phone has processor that is 10x as faster and 16x as much storage. Have to build computers robust enough to survive).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:35 PM
Heh. Software talk. Ben's phone has a processor 10 times faster than MSL, but his phone is only monitoring his twitter feed! ;D

Software transition talk. The slides explain.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:36 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:36 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:37 PM
2 new apps coming in R10
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/10/2012 05:37 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:39 PM
R10 software will include ability to drive & do the science

(R9 was the entry software)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:40 PM
If all goes well on Sol 6 we will commit to R10
Then we will implement the backup computer, with Sol 7 will ccmmit to the backup computer
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:47 PM
Even after this first EDL ops, they know they can do better on future missions.

Ironically, Craig Covalt asks for a show of hands from team members on who is now looking for another job now.

A Canadian report thinks she's the only one asking questions today....and rocks excite her! :D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:47 PM
Q from CBC in Yellowknife!!

How did you decide to call the landing site "Yellowknife"?
Some of the oldest rocks found here, so perhaps that's why?

A (panel) : "We're just the delivery guys"

Naming convention from the science dep't. They found Joy Crips in the audience

Joy Crisp: It was a quadrangle
Q: Are all the other quadrangles named?
A: I believe so
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:49 PM
Jonathan Amos, BBC! Top man.

Asking about comms and debris field.

Another HiRise image of the landing site coming up, he's told.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:50 PM
BBC news reporter

Q: about descent stage impact site
A: Another imaging opportunity 6 days after landing (from above). Will be a Nadir image. Cleaner image, better resolution
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:52 PM
Q about computer used

Rad hardened processor
133 Mhz chip
Software optimized

R10 frees up some of our processor utilization (much like cleaning up you home computer to make it faster). Same speed processor, just makes it runs faster

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:54 PM
Talking about the skycrane technology and its use on future missions, cargo resupply drops.

"Absolutely. will review data..."
"We are already working on it"
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 05:55 PM
Apparently they had a bingo game relating to landing. Guy who won probably rigged it (they joke) ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:57 PM
Q: about picture of parachute. Was this thought of ahead of time?

A: yes. Pre-programmed. Goal was to see if anything went right, or went wrong. Confirmation of precision landing

~ 1 sec before MLE priming. 3000m descending ~80m/sec

On pre-landing day: had 50/50 chance of getting it
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robert Thompson on 08/10/2012 05:57 PM
Posted this earlier. They aren't using it, but it's better.
Sharpened HiRISE image with noise removed
http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2012/details/cut/MSL_EDL_sharp.tif
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 05:59 PM
Q: about landing error & winds, and being ~ 1.5 miles out of expected target

A: Bank reversal pretty late and didn't have time to correct it along the center line of the ellipse. Could have been a tail wind.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:00 PM
Q: about using longer or shorter tethers on the skycrane

A: use a longer tether. Heavily analyzed during development. Bridle short enough to be manageable & reduce decris kick-up, and make sure debris could be up there. Everything we have seen is as expected.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:01 PM
Talking about software

Software was uploaded during cruise (had the opportunity). Software will continue to be updated throughout surface activities.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:02 PM
Any Issues?

Landed with more fuel than anticipated

A few unxpected tones

working with 1MB of 60MB data, so working with what we have so far. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:04 PM
Q (from Irish reporter): Looking to the future. Over enginnered? Lighter and meaner next time around?

A: Minor things we would change. To save costs, stick with what works. Not over-designed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:06 PM
Q: Using what worked this time, could it be used on future air bad landings?

A: Could. Would need to use RCS jets during hypesonic flight. MER rovers didn't have that
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:06 PM
Q: on thermals during entry

A: No data on peak heating & thermocouple data
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/10/2012 06:10 PM
Heh! Someone asks about the interest and the photoshoped images - to which some of the team in the audience start patting one of the guys on the back, so you can tell there's been some internal shenanigans there! ;D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:10 PM
Q: on MSL coverage enduring even during the Olympics / social media

A: People are engaged, it's nice to see "They paid for it, they should be"
"I think it's great" "I hope the communications keep moving arong around"

Q: Do you feel like rock stars?
A: "I was recognized at the pizza parlour" HA!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:14 PM
final news conference for this week.

ended
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: starsilk on 08/10/2012 06:18 PM
Heh! Someone asks about the interest and the photoshoped images - to which some of the team in the audience start patting one of the guys on the back, so you can tell there's been some internal shenanigans there! ;D

I think that was 'mohawk guy'. pretty sure I spotted him sitting there when they panned the camera around at one point.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/10/2012 06:20 PM
Heh! Someone asks about the interest and the photoshoped images - to which some of the team in the audience start patting one of the guys on the back, so you can tell there's been some internal shenanigans there! ;D

I think that was 'mohawk guy'. pretty sure I spotted him sitting there when they panned the camera around at one point.

he was definitely there, I saw him too (was putting screen captures into paint at the time so I missed any back patting)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/10/2012 06:22 PM
He was sitting to the right of Rob Manning.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/10/2012 06:23 PM
When Ben the software man was talking, I thought I heard him refer to "the dust removal tool".... Did I hear correct? (we can listen again in recording) I would be interested to know any more about this, if anyone here has more information. Thanks.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Rocket Science on 08/10/2012 06:26 PM
The “Yellowknife” question was answered as to a tip of a hat to the geology tradition when searching for the oldest rocks on Earth begins with going outwards from Yellowknife and they wish to continue the tradition on Mars…
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Tcommon on 08/10/2012 06:56 PM
I think that was 'mohawk guy'. pretty sure I spotted him sitting there when they panned the camera around at one point.

The 'mohawk guy' has been all over the news -- now lets not forget the original Mohawk Man;

(http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4223/p131.jpg)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/10/2012 06:59 PM
When Ben the software man was talking, I thought I heard him refer to "the dust removal tool".... Did I hear correct? (we can listen again in recording) I would be interested to know any more about this, if anyone here has more information. Thanks.

It is brush on the arm for clearing a sample site
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/10/2012 07:32 PM
Thank you Jim
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/10/2012 07:45 PM
Thanks all for very detailed report of the conference!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 08/10/2012 07:53 PM
Thanks for all that info.

 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: marsman2020 on 08/10/2012 09:15 PM
When Ben the software man was talking, I thought I heard him refer to "the dust removal tool".... Did I hear correct? (we can listen again in recording) I would be interested to know any more about this, if anyone here has more information. Thanks.

It is brush on the arm for clearing a sample site

And the reason there is a brush there and not a Surface Removal Tool like the MER RAT on steroids is that Al Stern de-scoped the SRT to save less then .1% of MSLs overall budget (my WAG only, but we didn't save much).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: corrodedNut on 08/11/2012 12:23 AM
Just a heads up, tonight at 9:00pm ET and then again at 12:00am ET (check your local listings) NatGeo channel is airing: "Mega Mars Rover". If you haven't seen it, its a nice one hour documentary with some interesting background on Curiosity's development.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jcopella on 08/11/2012 12:57 PM
Just a heads up, tonight at 9:00pm ET and then again at 12:00am ET (check your local listings) NatGeo channel is airing: "Mega Mars Rover". If you haven't seen it, its a nice one hour documentary with some interesting background on Curiosity's development.

Thanks for the heads-up -- it was a great show.

I have two criticisms:

1. It should've been longer.
2. It was followed immediately by "Chasing UFOs" :(
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jamie Young on 08/11/2012 05:25 PM

Also, heads up to L2 members to download this 650mb video of the dual screen live GUI data and live control room video from another JPL room of the EDL! Epic.
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29674.0

Thanks! That is awesome!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/11/2012 09:44 PM

A part hi res panorama is available here

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16051
Pretty!


The raw images are still not showing up on the jpl site so we are definitely not seeing them posted on the raw images ite as soon as they arrive.
http://marsmobile.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=3

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/11/2012 11:39 PM
The raw images are now up and they are MUCH sharper than that panorama!

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000010000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000069000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000125000E1_DXXX.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: tigerade on 08/11/2012 11:54 PM
The raw images are now up and they are MUCH sharper than that panorama!

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000010000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000069000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000125000E1_DXXX.jpg

Beautiful.  It's hard to believe I'm looking at another world.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/12/2012 12:06 AM
I'm loving these MSSS-provided cameras, color images right out of the box!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/12/2012 12:21 AM
The raw images are now up and they are MUCH sharper than that panorama!

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000010000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000069000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000125000E1_DXXX.jpg

Beautiful.  It's hard to believe I'm looking at another world.

Mars always reminds me of Jordan. But those crater walls tell a different story.
It is a beautiful world.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 08/12/2012 01:29 AM
The raw images are now up and they are MUCH sharper than that panorama!

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000010000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000069000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000125000E1_DXXX.jpg

pic #1 is like half of my army pictures....

There's always a desert mountain range in the background (the back of the range), there's always some features in the foothills (that's where you're going) and there's ALWAYS an old, rusty, disused half-opened 50 gallon metal drum somewhere in the FoV. Always.

What I'd love to know is what's printed upside down on the back of the drum.  $20 says "cooking oil".

:)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: IRobot on 08/12/2012 01:45 AM
 :o Those pictures are absolutely amazing!!! I bet you can even do basic geology science with that detail!!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 08/12/2012 04:13 AM
Mountains
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000016000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000015000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000014000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000013000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000012000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000011000E1_DXXX.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/12/2012 04:21 AM
Mountains
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000016000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000015000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000014000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000013000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000012000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000011000E1_DXXX.jpg

That last picture seems to have a switchback road leading up the mountains on the right. Are we sure this isn't Earth? :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 08/12/2012 04:47 AM
The nearly obscured far rim

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000034000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000035000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000036000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000037000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000038000E1_DXXX.jpg
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000039000E1_DXXX.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: cleonard on 08/12/2012 05:48 AM
This appears to be a high res mosaic of the above images.  Looks nice.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/images/pia16051_figure_1_raw_smaller-full.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ArbitraryConstant on 08/12/2012 07:59 AM
It's amazing how a little erosion and atmospheric haze makes it look so much more like home than the moon.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/12/2012 09:43 AM
There is an arrowish shaped pebble to the bottom left of this image that looks as though it has been dislodged from a spot below. I wonder if that is due to the rockets or whether the rover bounced a little or just my misinterpretation?

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000125000E1_DXXX.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: saturnapollo on 08/12/2012 01:16 PM
Superb images!

Thanks for posting these as I can't find them on the JPL Curiousity site, which is the root directory.

How are you finding these? If you go to the root directory it just takes you to the JPL Curiousity site and the photos aren't under Raw or Images in the Multimedia menu.

Keith

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/12/2012 01:21 PM
They're here: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/

The hi-res Mastcams are under sol 3, although the page still seems to be behaving funky. For example, the images in the first couple of rows show only the thumbnails as available, even though the full frames are there as well (and in fact were linked there originally, but disappeared since). Whereas the thumbnail filenames end with I1_DXXX.jpg, the full resolution ones end with E1_DXXX.jpg

Here's an animated gif of 4 frames showing the shadows move over the course of 8 minutes.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: saturnapollo on 08/12/2012 01:24 PM
Many thanks for that. I hadn't scrolled down beyond the thumbnails, thinking these would be the latest to be added to the selection!

Silly me!

Keith
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: douglas100 on 08/12/2012 01:39 PM
It's amazing how a little erosion and atmospheric haze makes it look so much more like home than the moon.

Absolutely. And it's amazing how little atmosphere you need to get that haze.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/12/2012 01:57 PM
This appears to be a high res mosaic of the above images.  Looks nice.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/images/pia16051_figure_1_raw_smaller-full.jpg

Indeed. This 50mb jpg panoram looks much much sharper than the first 9mb pia16051 jpg, just like original 'subframes'.

By the way, if you look up to horizon from left pair of exposed bedrock you will notice some kind of layered ground, what is that? Also, very interesting area inside the dunes, looks like exposed layer of rock, i wonder, if they are planning to visit it.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/12/2012 02:04 PM
Actually, it's still not as sharp as the original frames, but it *is* much sharper than the 9 MB version.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fr4nK on 08/12/2012 03:00 PM
What could be dark region from that picture? almost looks like a river!
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0003ML0000023000E1_DXXX&s=3 (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0003ML0000023000E1_DXXX&s=3)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/12/2012 03:03 PM
Dune field.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: clongton on 08/12/2012 03:40 PM
Dust on the deck

I totally love the pictures and panoramas, but I'm really surprised that the designers didn't include *some* kind of directed blower to remove accumulating dust on occasion. It's not like we haven't had to deal with Martian dust before. Everybody knows it *can* be a problem. And Curiosity, being nuclear powered, is not lacking in electrical ability to power the device. The last lander had to depend on being hit by a Martian dust devil to clear the solar panels for crying out loud. After spending all that money and expending all that time, let's not leave our landers at the whim of Martian weather to remain operational. I really don't want to read on here in a year or 2 that a perfectly good rover has become useless because of accumulating dust.  Future lander developers, please take note.

Because it is not problem

It is not an issue for MSL and not worth the weight.  MSL is designed for a 2 years mission.

It also was not an issue for MER, they were only designed for 90 day missions.


Jim, regardless of the mission it was "designed" for we all know that barring some physical accident that the rover itself can function MUCH, MUCH longer than that - many years longer. Saying that it's not a problem because the mission is only 2 years is not helpful.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: clongton on 08/12/2012 03:47 PM
Oh, and by the way...

The images are up :

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=3

:)

So good news everyone!

They're great. Too bad you can't slide-show view them. Have to return to the thumbnails every time to get the next one.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/12/2012 04:01 PM
Jim, regardless of the mission it was "designed" for we all know that barring some physical accident that the rover itself can function MUCH, MUCH longer than that - many years longer. Saying that it's not a problem because the mission is only 2 years is not helpful.

By all means we do not know that. MERs were tested for 90 days and beyond that it was anybody's guess how long they would last. The fact they did last much longer than guaranteed is still no proof that MSL can last that much longer. Don't fall into the trap of extrapolating MER experience to MSL, it's different hardware.

It doesn't make sense to include hardware and abilities like dust wipers that only become useful at the point when all your other components are past their guaranteed design life. Use that mass to put more science on the vehicle instead. Fact is, dust is nowhere near an issue for MSL as it is for MER and Gale crater is described as a pretty windy place, anyway.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: clongton on 08/12/2012 04:08 PM
Jim, regardless of the mission it was "designed" for we all know that barring some physical accident that the rover itself can function MUCH, MUCH longer than that - many years longer. Saying that it's not a problem because the mission is only 2 years is not helpful.

By all means we do not know that. MERs were tested for 90 days and beyond that it was anybody's guess how long they would last. The fact they did last much longer than guaranteed is still no proof that MSL can last that much longer. Don't fall into the trap of extrapolating MER experience to MSL, it's different hardware.

Common expression. How about "based on past experience with American rovers, in all likelihood"?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/12/2012 04:12 PM

1.  Jim, regardless of the mission it was "designed" for we all know that barring some physical accident that the rover itself can function MUCH, MUCH longer than that - many years longer.

2.  Saying that it's not a problem because the mission is only 2 years is not helpful.

1.  That doesn't matter. The system is designed around the 90 day requirement for MER and hence, dust accumulation is not a consideration for that duration and so, blowers weren't added and the mass was used for something else more beneficial.    If it becomes a problem after that, who cares?  You take what bonus time there is and work around the issues that the rovers weren't designed for.

2.  First of all, dust on top of the MSL rover chassis is not a problem, regardless of the lifetime.  Where dust accumulation would be an issue, MMTG fins, a solution was designed in, the MMRTG is mounted at an angle.  And yes, you only design to the mission duration requirement and not for extended mission, regardless if you know it can last longer.  That is one way to control costs.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/12/2012 04:17 PM
Common expression. How about "based on past experience with American rovers, in all likelihood"?

That is hardly a big enough statistical sample to draw confident claims from. Of course it's everyone's expectation that MSL will live more than 1 Mars year, but engineering should IMHO be done by setting requirements, not expectations. Otherwise what's stopping you from escalating costs for example when you realize one component could significantly outlive another and you wish to "improve" that other component as well?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: lcs on 08/12/2012 04:29 PM
There is an arrowish shaped pebble to the bottom left of this image that looks as though it has been dislodged from a spot below. I wonder if that is due to the rockets or whether the rover bounced a little or just my misinterpretation?

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00003/mcam/0003ML0000125000E1_DXXX.jpg

What I take away from this image is the wheel.  I recall the pre-launch photos show the wheel is black.  Aside from the granules on top of the rover, this is the first indication I've seen of a much finer dust coating. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: clongton on 08/12/2012 04:37 PM
Common expression. How about "based on past experience with American rovers, in all likelihood"?

That is hardly a big enough statistical sample to draw confident claims from. Of course it's everyone's expectation that MSL will live more than 1 Mars year, but engineering should IMHO be done by setting requirements, not expectations. Otherwise what's stopping you from escalating costs for example when you realize one component could significantly outlive another and you wish to "improve" that other component as well?

Ok, I cede the point. But I would think that given the cost of designing a rover and actually sending to the Martian surface, that we would want to maximize the capability and longevity as much as we can for the express purpose of extending the DRM as much as possible, within financial constraints. After all we don't do this every other week. Let's get the most bang for the buck we possibly can. That means seriously planning, within funding constraints, for a potential long-term extended mission. To plan only for the DRM when we are reasonably confident that an extended mission is likely possible is short sighted imo. Don't get me wrong I am not criticizing this rover or its design team. To the contrary I continue to be proud and amazed by it and them. But I am hoping future design teams will think longer term than the DRM. For example, did this team plan for an extended mission? If so, what are the defining parameters? If not, why not? That's not a criticism - just a question.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/12/2012 04:42 PM
Maybe we need a thread to discuss the MSL rover itself, to keep the updates thread cleaner

Great discussion points though, we need to keep them
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 08/12/2012 07:48 PM
I'm having trouble telling the true color of the sky. When I look at the far rim images I posted on my phone, the sky and rim are a butterscotch. But on my laptop, it's a bluish white, not yellow at all.

What do your screens show?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/12/2012 07:53 PM
But I am hoping future design teams will think longer term than the DRM. For example, did this team plan for an extended mission? If so, what are the defining parameters? If not, why not? That's not a criticism - just a question.

They can't.  They don't have the budget or the authority to do it.
It is not a reference mission.  The Design mission is a hard constraint.  That sets all resource planning and utilization.

Extended missions are not really planned until the basic mission is complete.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JebbPA on 08/12/2012 08:17 PM
I have been following this forum since Sol 1, what a great forum!

I just wanted to share my humble approach on a more earth-like panorama.

“Curiosity is the very basis of education and if you tell me that curiosity killed the cat, I say only the cat died nobly.”
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: saturnapollo on 08/12/2012 08:22 PM
Quote
I'm having trouble telling the true color of the sky. When I look at the far rim images I posted on my phone, the sky and rim are a butterscotch. But on my laptop, it's a bluish white, not yellow at all.

What do your screens show?


I see them as butterscotch on my monitor but these are unprocessed colours

See here for explanation:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4421

But even the colour corrected one doesn't look blue on my monitor just less butterscotch and a bit more neutral.

I must admit I do like the unprocessed colours better - looks more like Mars should :)!

Keirg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 08/12/2012 10:21 PM
But I would think that given the cost of designing a rover and actually sending to the Martian surface, that we would want to maximize the capability and longevity as much as we can for the express purpose of extending the DRM as much as possible, within financial constraints.
They had to cut significant capabilities from the primary mission because of "financial constraints" (AKA being more than a billion over budget). They were also so far behind schedule they missed their launch window. It should be obvious that "nice to have" stuff that only applied to an extended mission would be totally out of the question.

That said, without any extra cost/effort, odds for a significant extended mission appear good. There are no consumables which give a hard cutoff at 1 Mars year. The actuators are designed as much as possible to guarantee the nominal mission, so they aren't likely to drop dead at +1 day. Same goes for dust accumulation, if they can survive a full mission in the worst case, the typical case should be a lot longer. From the press briefings, I got the impression an extra Mars year should be well within reach, and substantially longer isn't out of the question.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 08/12/2012 11:02 PM
Extended missions are not really planned until the basic mission is complete.

I think budget and resource allocation stops extended missions being taken for granted.

JPL can't be asking to run this mission in 5 years because operating this rover isn't free.

It has to be reviewed at each step a mission extension is called for. What power levels are still available?, what instruments should be used? (or are still operational), what science objectives should change?. Then if the returns are there decisions to continue the mission can be made.

So any word about when the rover might be driving?

I don't even know what Sol we're on now. Seems like she's just been sitting there forever.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/13/2012 12:03 AM

I don't even know what Sol we're on now. Seems like she's just been sitting there forever.

6 sols: 23 hours: 00 minutes: 18 seconds

as of right now
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Blackstar on 08/13/2012 12:05 AM
Extended missions are not really planned until the basic mission is complete.

That's not quite correct. The people involved start thinking about extended missions when the basic mission's end is in sight. After all, they cannot simply shut down the spacecraft and wait for their extension proposal to be approved. I forget when MSL's primary mission is supposed to end, but I can guarantee you that NASA will set a deadline for extension proposals perhaps three-six months before that date.

JCM might be a good person to chime in on this, since he has direct experience with extended missions for astronomy.

However, I'd add several points to this discussion:

1-For a long time planetary missions did not really need to worry too much about extended missions, because there was always an assumption that you operate the spacecraft until it dies. It was primarily astronomy missions that had to take continued operating costs into account. Astronomy has undergone things called "senior reviews" whereby the science return for active missions is considered and they make a decision which spacecraft to continue operating and which ones to shut off. (WISE is one example where NASA chose to shut it down even though it was still working. I think Spitzer is in the same situation.)

Planetary generally did not need to do this, because more often than not they had hard or semi-hard lifetimes, such as Phoenix (death by cold) or Deep Impact (fuel running out). However, this is changing because there are so many active planetary missions, and many of them are lasting long beyond their primary lifetimes. So you can expect to see more scrutiny of mission extensions. Senior reviews for planetary missions are increasingly likely. A good example is what to do with Opportunity. Is it worthwhile to keep it operating now that Curiosity is active?

2-Mars surface missions are in some ways different than other missions because, as a senior non-Mars scientist once explained to me, "it's so damned hard getting down to the surface that as long as the spacecraft is operating, you keep it running."

It could be a decade or more before we get another spacecraft to the surface of Mars, and so you can expect NASA to try and keep MSL running for as long as possible.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/13/2012 12:06 AM
Sorry this is a little late...but I feel it needs to be posted  :)

The Maple Leaf Returns to Mars

Canadian science instrument part of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission
Longueuil, Quebec, August 6, 2012 — NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) touched down on the Red Planet today at 1:32 a.m. EDT, marking the second time a Canadian science instrument lands on Mars. The mission's rover, dubbed Curiosity, carries an instrument roughly the size and shape of a Rubik's cube provided by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). Known as the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), the device will probe the chemistry of rocks and soils on Mars to help determine if the planet ever was, or could still be today, an environment able to support microbial life.

"In 2008, Canadians celebrated as NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander mission marked the first time we, as a country, landed Canadian technology on the surface of another planet," said Steve MacLean, President of the CSA. "Mars Science Lab is another first for Canada: the first time wereach out and "touch" Mars, since APXS will investigate the planet's surface."
The Canadian two-in-one instrument is the second of Webb's four instruments to be delivered. It consists of the Webb's Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), which will direct the telescope precisely, and the Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (or NIRISS) science instrument. Both were designed, built and tested by COM DEV International in Ottawa and Cambridge, Ontario, with technical contributions from the Université de Montréal and the National Research Council of Canada, and under the leadership of the FGS science team. The CSA's contribution guarantees Canadian astronomers a share of observing time once the telescope launches.

The size of a small car, Curiosity is a mobile science lab equipped with the largest, most advanced suite of science instruments ever to land on Mars. Curiosity will analyze samples on site to determine whether Mars was ever a habitable planet, characterize the climate and geology of Mars, and pave the way for human exploration. APXS is one of 10 science instruments on Curiosity. It will determine the chemical composition of Martian rocks and soil samples to establish their geological history, identify possible alterations by water and perform sample triage for the on-board laboratory instruments. It will be used regularly throughout the mission, which is planned to last one full Martian year (687 Earth days).

An improved version of the instruments on Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity, this latest version of APXS was developed specifically for MSL under the scientific leadership of Dr. Ralf Gellert of the University of Guelph, Principal Investigator for APXS. Dr. Gellert also heads the APXS science team, which is composed of members from the University of Guelph, the University of New Brunswick, NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab (a division of Caltech), the University of California, San Diego, Cornell University, the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Australian National University. With funding from the CSA, scientists from Brock University, the University of Western Ontario and the CSA are also participating in the mission as NASA-selected Participating Scientists.

The CSA is investing $17.8 million in the design, construction, primary operations and scientific support of APXS. The CSA managed the development and construction of the instrument with MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (MDA) as the prime contractor for APXS. The University of Guelph provided the scientific direction for the design and engineering support during the development, calibrated the APXS instrument and will lead the science operations for the instrument. Components of APXS were tested in Brampton, Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa, Toronto and Guelph.

http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/media/news_releases/2012/0806.asp
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Blackstar on 08/13/2012 12:08 AM
They had to cut significant capabilities from the primary mission because of "financial constraints" (AKA being more than a billion over budget).

There was another aspect to this. I forget the exact details, but when they went over budget, NASA cut back on the lifetime testing. I believe that originally they planned to test the rover to enable it to achieve something like three times its planned lifetime. When the budget went high, they cut the testing to assure confidence that it could only achieve its primary mission.

This produced some savings, without risking the primary mission.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/13/2012 07:39 AM
Is there a specific date where it is planned for the rover to start driving?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: clongton on 08/13/2012 10:04 AM
2-Mars surface missions are in some ways different than other missions because, as a senior non-Mars scientist once explained to me, "it's so damned hard getting down to the surface that as long as the spacecraft is operating, you keep it running."

It could be a decade or more before we get another spacecraft to the surface of Mars, and so you can expect NASA to try and keep MSL running for as long as possible.

That was exactly my point for bringing up extended missions. I understand about the funding constraints, I really do, but Blackstar's statement is why I believe that lander and rover designers need to think beyond the DRM for their spacecraft and very deliberately do whatever they can when designing for the DRM to be able to make their spacecraft last as long as humanly possible. From what I know about Curiosity's design, it would not surprise me to see her continue to function well 5 or 6 years from now. She is well designed and built. Given that, I wanted to know what thought the scientists had given to extended missions because I believe she will last long enough to execute at least 1 if not 2.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/13/2012 11:11 AM
That was exactly my point for bringing up extended missions. I understand about the funding constraints, I really do, but Blackstar's statement is why I believe that lander and rover designers need to think beyond the DRM for their spacecraft and very deliberately do whatever they can when designing for the DRM to be able to make their spacecraft last as long as humanly possible.

No, you don't.  The funding constraints and thinking beyond the design requirements are mutually exclusive and actually the opposite happens.  Most of the time when they find excessive margin, it is redesigned to save money.


P.S.  there are no DRM for one of a kind spacecraft
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Nathan on 08/13/2012 12:59 PM
Is there any update on how the software upgrade is progressing?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 01:10 PM
Oh here we go! Some pimping for MSL in the mainstream media hopefully!!

Congratulations to @MarsCuriosity team from President Obama at 11am ET today. Watch live on NASA TV: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 01:35 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY: M12-149

PRESIDENT OBAMA TO CALL NASA CURIOSITY MARS ROVER TEAM TODAY



WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama will congratulate members of
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover team at the agency's Jet Propulsion
Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., at 11 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. PDT)
this morning.

Audio of the call and video of the JPL team's portion of the call will
be carried live on NASA Television and the agency's website.

President Obama's call comes a week after Curiosity landed on the Red
Planet. Curiosity carries the most advanced science payload ever used
on Mars' surface. During the next 2 years, it will use its 10
instruments to investigate whether conditions have been favorable for
microbial life and for preserving clues in the rocks about possible
past life.

Curiosity was designed, developed and assembled at JPL, which also is
where the rover's mission control is located.

For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming
video, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

For more information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/mars

and

http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/msl

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 02:56 PM
Someone needs to turn off the open mic! Whoops!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 03:00 PM
Nervous room! :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 03:08 PM
El Presidente. "We're all very excited. We were wondering if you have found Martians.

"Captured the imagination of 10s of millions of people. How you got on Mars was incredibly impressive. The 500,000 lines of code working. It's really mind boggling the way you got that landing sequence to work."

Awww, Adam looked overjoyed when he had his name read out! :)

"Your hard work is now paying dividends. Curiosity will lay the foundations for more ambitious mission with humans."

Mohawk guy reference! President is considering one himself.

"Does sound like NASA has come a long way from the white shirts. NASA is cooler nowadays."

STEM references. Inspiring kids - want to be a part of a Mars mission, maybe the first Mars astronaut.

More names getting mentioned. And thanks the international partners for contributing to the instrumentation.

"You've made is all proud and are an example of American ingenuity".

Notes he will protect the investment.

Wants to know when they do contact Martians. Even if they are just microbes :D

"You've already inspired us but I can't wait for the photos to come back. Congratulations and keep up the great work."

That was good!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ChrisC on 08/13/2012 03:11 PM
Thanks for the coverage, Chris B.!  I just barely missed it aaaaaargh ....

Will look forward to the replays/online availability shortly.

Is there any update on how the software upgrade is progressing?

Nope, not a peep.  I've been checking Ben Cichy's Twitter feed (https://twitter.com/bencichy) and he's saying nothing.  He did answer a softball question a couple hours ago there so it's not like he's buried in a crisis or anything, so I'm not really worried.  But I expect we'll hear something this afternoon as they come off their work shift.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Rocket Science on 08/13/2012 03:12 PM
That was a “well-earned” pat on the back.  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/13/2012 03:13 PM
Thanks for the coverage, Chris B.!  I just barely missed it aaaaaargh ....

Will look forward to the replays/online availability shortly.


Ditto & same here.

A good plug for NASA is always welcomed (as is continued funding) :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 03:14 PM
Thanks for the coverage, Chris B.!  I just barely missed it aaaaaargh ....

Will look forward to the replays/online availability shortly.


Thanks and yep - John44 will have it, and NASA TV's bound to put it on youtube soon.

Was nice and casual, but got the main points in. No crazy promises and no silly "2035s" dates, but a big reference to human missions. Gave the media a headline with the Martians (tempted to use that myself).

Perfect really! :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 04:27 PM
Video is up.

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=150373681

Presser in 30 mins if they are still doing the 10am local presser.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 08/13/2012 04:35 PM
Video is up.

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=150373681

Presser in 30 mins if they are still doing the 10am local presser.
At the Friday (8/10) briefing it was stated that there was no set date for the next briefing. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: apace on 08/13/2012 04:36 PM
Is there some transcript of this phone call? The phone line quality was not the best for non-native speakers like me ;-)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 04:59 PM
Video is up.

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=150373681

Presser in 30 mins if they are still doing the 10am local presser.
At the Friday (8/10) briefing it was stated that there was no set date for the next briefing. 

Ah, I missed that. And yes, no presser today.

Well I think I'll write up where we are and use the President's quotes later.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/13/2012 05:19 PM
What is the schedule for next conferences?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/13/2012 05:21 PM
What is the schedule for next conferences?

We don't know yet.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ChrisC on 08/13/2012 05:21 PM
What is the schedule for next conferences?

Nothing posted yet.  I think they are waiting until they are through the software overhaul (today/tomorrow-ish) before announcing a forward plan.  When it's made public (or even leaked) you'll hear it here :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Sparky on 08/13/2012 07:18 PM
Are we going there? IT's just between us and Mount Sharp!
(http://jumpjack.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/3d-psp_009149009294-anim.gif)

Details:
http://jumpjack.wordpress.com/2012/08/10/un-paio-di-posti-interessanti-da-andare-a-vedere-su-marte/
I have a potentially silly question regarding this gif: Is the light coming from top or the bottom of the image? I am having trouble telling if I am looking at a ridge surrounded by crater like-depressions, or a valley flanked by raised mounds to either side. I've managed to trick my eyes into seeing both versions recently.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jnc on 08/13/2012 08:10 PM
Is the light coming from top or the bottom of the image? I am having trouble telling if I am looking at a ridge surrounded by crater like-depressions, or a valley flanked by raised mounds to either side.

Well, I'm pretty sure the terrain at the top of the image is higher than that at the bottom (given that the bottom seems to be a classic braided alluvial plain, almost certainly created by runoff). And the large channel in the middle of that braided runoff would seem to source from the 'ridge or valley' thing, which would make it a valley.

Noel

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lars_J on 08/13/2012 08:46 PM
Is the light coming from top or the bottom of the image? I am having trouble telling if I am looking at a ridge surrounded by crater like-depressions, or a valley flanked by raised mounds to either side.

Well, I'm pretty sure the terrain at the top of the image is higher than that at the bottom (given that the bottom seems to be a classic braided alluvial plain, almost certainly created by runoff). And the large channel in the middle of that braided runoff would seem to source from the 'ridge or valley' thing, which would make it a valley.

Noel

No, the top of the image is the 'flat' type of terrain in the crater floor, then comes the darkest area which appears to be the lowest point in the crater. Then - moving down - the elevation increases until the base of 'mount sharp' starts at the bottom third of the images.

I could be wrong, but that's how I read the image based on other wider shots of the crater.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 08/13/2012 08:54 PM
You're correct. The bottom of the image is the mountain we came for.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jnc on 08/13/2012 09:03 PM
No, the top of the image is the 'flat' type of terrain in the crater floor, then comes the darkest area which appears to be the lowest point in the crater. Then - moving down - the elevation increases until the base of 'mount sharp' starts at the bottom third of the images.

Hmm. Could be. Odd that the braided alluvial formation has produced that deep channel leading to the cut, but on the high side of the cut, though. Well, I suppose it's possible. Look like maybe water came around both sides of the large rock at the lower right, and joined into that channel?

I think we both agree that the 'ridge or valley' feature is a valley, though, right (to answer the OP's question)? Seems to have remarkably steep (i.e. near vertical) sides, at least from what I see in the photo.

Noel

PS: I'm speaking of the narrow feature that runs from top to bottom through the ridge which runs sideways across the image, in the middle of the image. I assume that's what the OP was asking about, although now that I think about it, they could have been asking about the ridge which runs from side to side (asking if that was a ridge, or valley).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lars_J on 08/13/2012 09:14 PM
'mount sharp' starts at the bottom third of the images.
No, the top of the image is the 'flat' type of terrain in the crater floor, then comes the darkest area which appears to be the lowest point in the crater. Then - moving down - the elevation increases until the base of

Hmm. Could be. Odd that the braided alluvial formation has produced that deep channel leading to the cut, but on the high side of the cut, though. Well, I suppose it's possible. Look like maybe water came around both sides of the large rock at the lower right, and joined into that channel?

I think we both agree that the 'ridge or valley' feature is a valley, though, right (to answer the OP's question)? Seems to have remarkably steep (i.e. near vertical) sides, at least from what I see in the photo.

Keep in mind that the animated GIF is exaggerating the vertical differences.

Anyway, to prove that the bottom 3rd is indeed the base of Mount Sharp, here is a wider image: (the center part of this image covers the same area as the animated GIF)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: clongton on 08/13/2012 10:17 PM
That was exactly my point for bringing up extended missions. I understand about the funding constraints, I really do, but Blackstar's statement is why I believe that lander and rover designers need to think beyond the DRM for their spacecraft and very deliberately do whatever they can when designing for the DRM to be able to make their spacecraft last as long as humanly possible.

No, you don't.  The funding constraints and thinking beyond the design requirements are mutually exclusive and actually the opposite happens.  Most of the time when they find excessive margin, it is redesigned to save money.


P.S.  there are no DRM for one of a kind spacecraft

Yes I do. I guess you missed my post above where I ceded the point. As for your comment on DRM's you know perfectly well what I meant.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/13/2012 11:45 PM
NASA Hosts Teleconference About Curiosity Rover Progess

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT) on Tuesday, Aug.14, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its target area on Mars at 10:31 p.m. PDT, Aug. 5 (1:31 a.m. EDT, Aug. 6). Mission controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., spent last week beginning initial checks of Curiosity's 10 instruments and updating software for its two-year mission to investigate whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life.

Audio of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio .
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: cleonard on 08/14/2012 12:11 AM
NASA Hosts Teleconference About Curiosity Rover Progess

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT) on Tuesday, Aug.14, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its target area on Mars at 10:31 p.m. PDT, Aug. 5 (1:31 a.m. EDT, Aug. 6). Mission controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., spent last week beginning initial checks of Curiosity's 10 instruments and updating software for its two-year mission to investigate whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life.

Audio of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio .


Good to know that there will be more of these new conferences.  I understand that they might not be every day like last week, but I hope that we get them at least once a week for a few months.

Edit: 
This seems like it's not going to be on NASA TV.  It should be in my opinion.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/14/2012 12:43 AM
NASA Hosts Teleconference About Curiosity Rover Progess

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT) on Tuesday, Aug.14, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its target area on Mars at 10:31 p.m. PDT, Aug. 5 (1:31 a.m. EDT, Aug. 6). Mission controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., spent last week beginning initial checks of Curiosity's 10 instruments and updating software for its two-year mission to investigate whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life.

Audio of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio .


Good to know that there will be more of these new conferences.  I understand that they might not be every day like last week, but I hope that we get them at least once a week for a few months.

Edit: 
This seems like it's not going to be on NASA TV.  It should be in my opinion.

I would agree too, but they obviously have no new images as they are working on driving software.

I can wait  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/14/2012 04:18 AM
If someone wants to, we could use a dedicated image update thread? The highlights so far, then posts as they issue new ones. Avoids them getting lost in the live thread (where they can also be posted still).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/14/2012 04:18 AM
OK, so I played with this a bit. Gone with the fun headline, covered some status up to this point, focused on President Obama's call and then finished with the challenge of a human missions to Mars.

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2012/08/curiosity-martian-contact-call-president/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ChrisC on 08/14/2012 05:22 AM
NASA Hosts Teleconference About Curiosity Rover Progess
...
Audio of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio .

I want to warn you all about something here.  These teleconferences are common in unmanned spaceflight but less so in manned.  I follow UMSF closely so I've listened to a lot of these -- or at least attempted to.

NASA will NOT offer this audio up in an archive after the fact.  I've bugged them about this before, and they've explained that if they offer it up, then they also have to create a transcript and other formats in order to meet federal accessibility rules for government agency output.  And that strains the budget for what they think is a low demand item.

However there is nothing stopping someone else here from recording it and offering it up :)  Just in case, though, I'll be listening live ...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: racshot65 on 08/14/2012 10:36 AM
Quote
Wheel wiggle planned for sol 13 to check out the steer actuators. First drive planned for sol 15.

https://twitter.com/Matt_Heverly/status/235201959357976576 (https://twitter.com/Matt_Heverly/status/235201959357976576)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/14/2012 12:43 PM
It appears that the right rear wheel is already straight? I thought they are all still in it's "flight" position... ???


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/14/2012 12:44 PM
However there is nothing stopping someone else here from recording it and offering it up :)  Just in case, though, I'll be listening live ...

I will give it a try :) mp3 32kbit/s avg. stereo @ 22050Hz, one hour should be less than 20 000 KB attachment limit. If there are no warnings from admins I will attach it.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 08/14/2012 05:00 PM
Telecon about to start at:

http://www.nasa.gov/news/media/newsaudio/index.html

and visuals are up at:

 http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 08/14/2012 05:08 PM
The cutover to software release 10 went without any problems.

Now they will do more testing on the instruments - APXS and DAN.

Also they will do an electrical checkout of Chemin.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 08/14/2012 05:17 PM
Now discussing both new MRO images and MSL images.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 08/14/2012 05:25 PM
Now describing the MSL Avionics in moderate detail. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 08/14/2012 05:30 PM
MSL will complete the MASTCAM mosaic including Mt. Sharp in the next few days.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: MP99 on 08/14/2012 06:09 PM
However there is nothing stopping someone else here from recording it and offering it up :)  Just in case, though, I'll be listening live ...

I will give it a try :) mp3 32kbit/s avg. stereo @ 22050Hz, one hour should be less than 20 000 KB attachment limit. If there are no warnings from admins I will attach it.

Quote
Allowed file types: doc, docx, gif, ppt, srt, pptx, jpg, mpg, pdf, ods, odt, odp, ogg, kml, png, txt, zip, mp3, jpeg, wma, wmv, asf, mov, mp4, avi, xls, rm, rm3, flv, mpeg, xlsx
Maximum attachment size allowed: 20000 KB, per post: 150

MP3s allowed. Up to 150 files of 20MB each...

cheers, Martin
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ScientificMethod on 08/14/2012 06:16 PM
Did anyone catch the 800 phone number for the audio replay? I got 800 839 xxxx and missed the rest...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ehb on 08/14/2012 06:38 PM
Did anyone catch the 800 phone number for the audio replay? I got 800 839 xxxx and missed the rest...
800-839-3416
1 week archive.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jabe on 08/14/2012 06:39 PM
try here for replay
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/24703937
jb
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/14/2012 06:44 PM
Here's my full record of the news conference:

"MSL Media Teleconference - 08.14.12

NASA is hosting a media teleconference at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT) on Tuesday, Aug. 14, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater."

Slides: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/

Enjoy
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/14/2012 08:06 PM
Well done Fixer! :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/14/2012 09:38 PM
It would be nice to see the results of landing ellipse mapping by scientists that was initiated by Grotzinger just before landing (of 151 squares I think).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: savuporo on 08/14/2012 10:45 PM
Has it been mentioned if the full MEDLI dataset is downlinked yet ? Saw a post few days ago about team having 10% of it in hand.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/14/2012 11:21 PM
I really enjoyed the enthusiasm (and humor) of Ken, the MALHI camera guy at the presser last week. (he gave the "squirrels" answer when asked about the "walnut sized" rocks). Today I learned he attended Earlham College, as I did also.

Here is the college article about him, if you are interested:

  https://www.earlham.edu/news/articles/earlhams-martian-connection
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ChrisC on 08/15/2012 03:14 AM
Here's my full record of the news conference

try here for replay: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/24703937

Thanks Fixer and jabe!  Nice to see that JPL stepped up to address this problem.  Perhaps they operate under different constraints than NASA itself.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Apollo-phill on 08/15/2012 12:06 PM
I'd forgotten - until reminded by a USA friend - that my name (along with 1,246,445 other worldwide names) is etched  onto a microchip on board MSL Curiosity now parked inside Gale crater.

I submitted my name to NASA on 25 March 2009 and was accepted.

Here is my Certificate (in B&W - original in colour)


Phill Parker
UK
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ScientificMethod on 08/15/2012 04:31 PM
Looking for my daily Curiosity fix, either on NASA TV, on audio, or multimedia. Is there a conference call today at 10am PDT?

It would be good if the JPL media folks gave a clear indication if they want to transition the tempo to say weekly now, so we know when to check in.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: pippin on 08/15/2012 04:52 PM
Sorry if this is a duplicate, but did anybody post this?

http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2

If you've got an iPad, this is a must. Works on a computer as well but then the real fun gets a bit lost.

Get into an office chair for the best effect. This is how I want all space coverage :)

And no, I'm not going to spoil the fun effect :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/15/2012 04:53 PM
Looking for my daily Curiosity fix, either on NASA TV, on audio, or multimedia. Is there a conference call today at 10am PDT?

It would be good if the JPL media folks gave a clear indication if they want to transition the tempo to say weekly now, so we know when to check in.


Nothing posted except this (via Twitter):

MarsCuriosity Hey Redditors: Who's in for an #AMA with an #MSL engineer or 2...or 3...or more? Thur Aug 16 8am PT (1500 UT) @Reddit 16 hours ago
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/15/2012 04:54 PM
Sorry if this is a duplicate, but did anybody post this?

http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2

If you've got an iPad, this is a must. Works on a computer as well but then the real fun gets a bit lost.

And no, I'm not going to spoil the fun effect :)


!!!!!!!!!!!

(yes, must see)

thanks!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: aero on 08/15/2012 05:06 PM
Very nice!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ceepdublu on 08/15/2012 06:37 PM
Not sure if anyone else has caught this yet, but the Multimedia page (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/) is following a format similar to MER now, instead of the previous gallery-style format.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: WulfTheSaxon on 08/15/2012 11:12 PM
Oh, and by the way...

The images are up :

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=3

:)

So good news everyone!

They're great. Too bad you can't slide-show view them. Have to return to the thumbnails every time to get the next one.

Do what I do – middle-click all the links, then Ctrl+Tab through them.  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: neilh on 08/16/2012 07:42 AM
I haven't seen this mentioned here yet, but several Curiosity engineers and scientists are doing a reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) starting at 11am EDT Thursday:

http://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/y9n5v/curiosity_engineers_to_do_an_ama_on_thursday_816/
Quote
[–]CuriosityMarsRover 29 points 7 hours ago
We're looking forward to tomorrow's AMA and wanted to give you a heads up on who will participate. We're a group of engineers from landing night, plus team members (scientists and engineers) working on surface operations. We also wanted to point you to the mission press kit in case you want to read up. It's at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press_kits/MSLLanding.pdf .

Here's the list of participants so far: Bobak Ferdowsi aka “Mohawk Guy” - Flight Director
Steve Collins aka “Hippy NASA Guy” - Cruise Attitude Control/System engineer
Aaron Stehura - EDL Systems Engineer
Jonny Grinblat aka “Pre-celebration Guy” - Avionics System Engineer
Brian Schratz - EDL telecommunications lead
Keri Bean - Mastcam uplink lead/environmental science theme group lead
Rob Zimmerman - Power/Pyro Systems Engineer
Steve Sell - Deputy Operations Lead for EDL
Scott McCloskey -­ Turret Rover Planner
@MarsCuriosity Twitter Team
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/16/2012 10:56 AM
What is an AMA?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: racshot65 on 08/16/2012 01:08 PM
What is an AMA?


It stands for "Ask Me Anything"

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JebbPA on 08/16/2012 01:13 PM
Some Sol 10 images have recently been uploaded! does anyone know what these Chemcam images show? http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=10&camera=CHEMCAM_RMI
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/16/2012 02:13 PM
Parts of the MSL top deck?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jabe on 08/16/2012 02:21 PM
lens cover? :)
jb
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: neilh on 08/16/2012 03:32 PM
I haven't seen this mentioned here yet, but several Curiosity engineers and scientists are doing a reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) starting at 11am EDT Thursday:

http://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/y9n5v/curiosity_engineers_to_do_an_ama_on_thursday_816/
Quote
[–]CuriosityMarsRover 29 points 7 hours ago
We're looking forward to tomorrow's AMA and wanted to give you a heads up on who will participate. We're a group of engineers from landing night, plus team members (scientists and engineers) working on surface operations. We also wanted to point you to the mission press kit in case you want to read up. It's at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press_kits/MSLLanding.pdf .

Here's the list of participants so far: Bobak Ferdowsi aka “Mohawk Guy” - Flight Director
Steve Collins aka “Hippy NASA Guy” - Cruise Attitude Control/System engineer
Aaron Stehura - EDL Systems Engineer
Jonny Grinblat aka “Pre-celebration Guy” - Avionics System Engineer
Brian Schratz - EDL telecommunications lead
Keri Bean - Mastcam uplink lead/environmental science theme group lead
Rob Zimmerman - Power/Pyro Systems Engineer
Steve Sell - Deputy Operations Lead for EDL
Scott McCloskey -­ Turret Rover Planner
@MarsCuriosity Twitter Team

AMA started: http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/ybmmh/we_are_engineers_and_scientists_on_the_mars/

This one in particular is quite a good set of questions, and I'm particularly hopefulhttp://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/ybmmh/we_are_engineers_and_scientists_on_the_mars/c5u2pec the team answers the lens calibration question:
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ArbitraryConstant on 08/16/2012 04:08 PM
These are higher quality questions than at the pressers I've seen.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 08/16/2012 04:26 PM
I'd forgotten - until reminded by a USA friend - that my name (along with 1,246,445 other worldwide names) is etched  onto a microchip on board MSL Curiosity now parked inside Gale crater.

I dunno.  You know the way aliens are.  As soon as "Melvin" finds that chip, I betcha you all are going to get a visit from a little green man about landing stuff in his back yard.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/16/2012 05:08 PM
Does that Reddit AMA thing mean that engineers are answering questions NOW live online somehow? I've seen nothing from them in the links given here. [confused]
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: neilh on 08/16/2012 05:14 PM
Does that Reddit AMA thing mean that engineers are answering questions NOW live online somehow? I've seen nothing from them in the links given here. [confused]

they're answering questions right now at the link I posted a few above. Their reddit responses are highlighted and under the name "CuriosityMarsRover." They posted a pic to Twitter confirming it was them.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/16/2012 05:49 PM
Thank you neilh!
News to me was that they on average will transfer about 31 Mbytes per Sol.
And I didn't know they coded in C for simplicity!
410 scientists and engineers work in shift on the project since 1-10 years. Now I understand why it costs billions...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Andrew Faulring on 08/16/2012 06:20 PM
The raw images website now has 127 full frame images from MARDI.

  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=0&camera=MARDI

Frame #358 taken at 2012-08-06 05:16:52 UTC appears to show the heat shield impact location, possibly including the debris plume.

  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000358E1_DXXX.jpg
  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0000MD9999000358E1_DXXX&s=0

Look for the dark spot centered about 50 pixels from the bottom of frame. Crop of full frame attached.

North is towards the upper right corner. Rotate the MARDI frame about 45 degrees counterclockwise to align with the MRO HiRISE images (see below).

I believe this is the heat shield because

(1) The location is consistent with the heat shield as imaged by MRO HiRISE:

  http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/PIA16001.html

(2) The frame was taken 65 seconds before touchdown. The HiRISE EDL image was taken around one minute before touchdown and shows the heat shield still in free flight close to the impact point.

  http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia15993.html

(3) The dark spot does not appear in MARDI frame #344 taken around 3.5 seconds earlier:

  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000344E1_DXXX.jpg
  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0000MD9999000344E1_DXXX&s=0

Note that the field of view rotated towards the top of the image between frames #344 and #358, so the impact location would be about a third the way up from the bottom of the earlier frame.

The next full frame that has been downloaded is #372. In this frame the impact location is not visible, since it is below the bottom of this frame.

  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000372E1_DXXX.jpg
  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0000MD9999000372E1_DXXX&s=0

(4) The descending heat shield is visible in earlier frames. The last frame in which the heat shield is clearly visible is #162:

  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000162E1_DXXX.jpg
  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0000MD9999000162E1_DXXX&s=0

Look above the sand dunes a few hundred pixels from the left edge of the frame about one third down from the top. The next three full frames (#200, #228, #241) show a white dot moving left to right over the dark sand dunes.

  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000200E1_DXXX.jpg
  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000228E1_DXXX.jpg
  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00000/mrdi/0000MD9999000241E1_DXXX.jpg

After that the heat shield is not visible probably because it was over the lighter colored areas.

The dark spot in frame #358 is much larger than the last image of the heat shield. Thus frame #358 is likely showing the impact location and possibly the debris plume of the heat shield.

We will have more confidence that this is the impact location after the remaining MARDI full frame images are downloaded. Would these be the first images of human-made hardware impacting Mars?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: savuporo on 08/16/2012 06:27 PM
The AMA is pretty interesting. As the thread is pretty big, if you want to see just the responses they keep posting, head over to http://www.reddit.com/user/CuriosityMarsRover and click on "context" for the answers you are interested in.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: neilh on 08/16/2012 08:12 PM
The raw images website now has 127 full frame images from MARDI.

  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=0&camera=MARDI

Someone on r/space made an unofficial HD youtube video from the images, pretty amazing:

http://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/ybe61/hires_animated_gif_from_mardi_of_heat_shield/c5u64od

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ju0Q6TWMYHw
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/16/2012 08:27 PM
Quote
Curiosity Update 1:30 p.m. EDT, Friday, Aug. 17

NASA will host a media teleconference at 1:30 p.m. EDT (10:30 a.m. PDT), Aug. 17, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

http://www.nasa.gov/news/media/newsaudio/index.html
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Duck on 08/17/2012 12:18 PM
Are those images the best we'll get of the landing sequence?  (Was there not a camera on the descent stage/skycrane that would have taken photos looking at the rover being lowered, from above?)

-Iain
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Kaputnik on 08/17/2012 01:01 PM
Are those images the best we'll get of the landing sequence?  (Was there not a camera on the descent stage/skycrane that would have taken photos looking at the rover being lowered, from above?)

-Iain

The main purpose of the MARDI footage is to help put the landing site into context when planning the initial science operations. The fact that you get a cool movie out of it is a byproduct :)
There was no science objective in taking footage from the descent stage; you could perhaps argue that it would be useful for engineering feedback but clearly that wasn't felt to be necessary. Anyway, it would have been a significant project in its own right as the descent stage as flown had no way of transmitting data back.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Duck on 08/17/2012 01:09 PM
Right; I always forget about the data transmission part.  Something taken for granted.  :)

That being said - as a mechanical designer - pictures and video feedback of machines in the field is crucial for future designs.  If I can't be on-site to troubleshoot a machine I've designed, I need to get the guys who are doing the install to send pics and video back to get the best result.  It is difficult to understand how something works, if you can't see or "feel" it!  I can't help but feel the team that worked on the mechanical elements of the whole skycrane maneouver would have loved to have had at least *something* to see the results of their labours.

-Iain
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: douglas100 on 08/17/2012 05:19 PM
If they thought a camera in the descent stage was worth it they would have installed one. I imagine the EDL guys got lots of data about how the skycrane maneuver went, up to the point when the connection to the rover was severed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/17/2012 06:08 PM
They lost contact!!!
Not with Curiosity, but with the telecon. I'm "off air" since about 15 minutes now. If someone recorded it, or knows where to find a recording, please post here! (Nice news about Glenelg!)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lars_J on 08/17/2012 06:20 PM
The telecon ran fine for me.

The images can be see here: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/17/2012 06:39 PM
In the second image at todays telecon,
When they reach the base of Mount Sharp, will they enter on the floor of that deep narrow valley leading SW, or will they climb up on one of the sides of it among those "four-story buildings" like hills? Isn't it that very valley which is expected to be layered like Grand Canyon and would be an excellent science target for geology?

3D effect image of it here (I found it somewhere else in this forum yesterday):
http://jumpjack.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/3d-psp_009149009294-anim.gif
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/17/2012 07:25 PM
Quote
NASA media teleconference at 10:30 a.m. PDT (1:30 p.m. EDT), Friday, Aug. 17, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

Participants:
John Grotzinger - Curiosity project scientist, California Institute of Technology
Roger Wiens - ChemCam principal investigator, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Slides: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
P.S. It seems they will drive to that interesting trisection point where high TI unit and other layers meet each other. 276K at landing point. Will test Chemcam, more high-res images to come in a days and weeks. Interesting telecon. Tell me if sound volume is too low.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 08/17/2012 09:21 PM
RELEASE: 12-287

NASA CURIOSITY TEAM PINPOINTS SITE FOR FIRST DRIVE, FIRST LASER USE ON TAP THIS WEEKEND

WASHINGTON -- The scientists and engineers of NASA's Curiosity rover
mission have selected the first destination for their one-ton,
six-wheeled mobile Mars laboratory. The target area, named Glenelg,
is a natural intersection of three kinds of terrain. The choice was
described by Curiosity Principal Investigator John Grotzinger of the
California Institute of Technology during a media teleconference on
Aug. 17.

"With such a great landing spot in Gale Crater, we literally had every
degree of the compass to choose from for our first drive," Grotzinger
said. "We had a bunch of strong contenders. It is the kind of dilemma
planetary scientists dream of, but you can only go one place for the
first drilling for a rock sample on Mars. That first drilling will be
a huge moment in the history of Mars exploration."

The trek to Glenelg will send the rover 1,300 feet (400 meters) east
southeast of its landing site. One of the three types of terrain
intersecting at Glenelg is layered bedrock, which is attractive as
the first drilling target.

"We're about ready to load our new destination into our GPS and head
out onto the open road," Grotzinger said. "Our challenge is there is
no GPS on Mars, so we have a roomful of rover-driver engineers
providing our turn-by-turn navigation for us."

Prior to the rover's trip to Glenelg, the team in charge of
Curiosity's Chemistry and Camera instrument, or ChemCam, is planning
to give their mast-mounted rock-zapping laser and telescope
combination a thorough checkout. On Saturday night, ChemCam is
expected to "zap" its first rock in the name of planetary science. It
will be the first time such a powerful laser has been used on the
surface of another world.

"Rock N165 looks like your typical Mars rock, about three inches wide.
It's about 10 feet away," said Roger Wiens, principal investigator of
the ChemCam instrument from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New
Mexico. "We are going to hit it with 14 millijoules of energy 30
times in 10 seconds. It is not only going to be an excellent test of
our system, it should be pretty cool too."

Mission engineers are devoting more time to planning the first roll of
Curiosity. In the coming days, the rover will exercise each of its
four steerable (front and back) wheels, turning each of them
side-to-side before ending up with each wheel pointing straight
ahead. On a later day, the rover will drive forward about one
rover-length (10 feet, or 3 meters), turn 90 degrees, and then kick
into reverse for about 7 feet (2 meters).

"There will be a lot of important firsts that will be taking place for
Curiosity over the next few weeks, but the first motion of its
wheels, the first time our roving laboratory on Mars does some actual
roving, that will be something special," said Michael Watkins,
mission manager for Curiosity from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in
Pasadena, Calif.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its
target area on Mars at 10:31:45 p.m. PDT on Aug. 5 (1:31:45 a.m. EDT
on Aug. 6), which included the 13.8 minutes needed for confirmation
of the touchdown to be radioed to Earth at the speed of light.

The audio and visuals of the teleconference will be archived and
available for viewing at:

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl

The mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate
in Washington. The rover was designed, developed and assembled at
JPL, a division of Caltech. ChemCam was provided by Los Alamos
National Laboratory. France provided ChemCam's laser and telescope.

For more information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JebbPA on 08/17/2012 09:36 PM
Some Sol 10 images have recently been uploaded! does anyone know what these Chemcam images show? http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=10&camera=CHEMCAM_RMI

For those who missed the telecon update, the early Chemcam images show this calibration target http://content.govdelivery.com/attachments/USLANL/2012/08/17/file_attachments/151341/ChemCamCalibrationPreLaunch.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/18/2012 01:50 AM
Heat Shield, Meet Mars

Published on Aug 17, 2012 by JPLnews
This sequence of images shows the heat shield from NASA's Mars Science Laboratory hitting the ground on Mars and raising a cloud of dust. The images were taken by the Mars Descent Imager on the mission's Curiosity rover while the rover was still suspended on a parachute, after the spacecraft had jettisoned the heat shield.

A dark spot, the shadow of the heat shield, enters the scene from lower left, moving toward the center. The bright heat shield itself is also apparent just before the shadow and hardware meet in the impact on the surface. The area of ground visible in the images is about six-tenths of a mile (1 kilometer) across. The frames shown here are cropped portions of full-frame images from the Mars Descent Imager.

The sequence includes 25 frames, repeated in five run-throughs for this presentation. The action is full speed in the first, fourth and fifth run-throughs. It is one-half and one-eighth speeds in the second and third run-throughs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVLPXfF3l_U
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/18/2012 01:43 PM
Quote
NASA media teleconference at 10:30 a.m. PDT (1:30 p.m. EDT), Friday, Aug. 17, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

Participants:
John Grotzinger - Curiosity project scientist, California Institute of Technology
Roger Wiens - ChemCam principal investigator, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Slides: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
P.S. It seems they will drive to that interesting trisection point where high TI unit and other layers meet each other. 276K at landing point. Will test Chemcam, more high-res images to come in a days and weeks. Interesting telecon. Tell me if sound volume is too low.

Thanks for the recording
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: notsorandom on 08/18/2012 04:39 PM
Heat Shield, Meet Mars

Published on Aug 17, 2012 by JPLnews
This sequence of images shows the heat shield from NASA's Mars Science Laboratory hitting the ground on Mars and raising a cloud of dust. The images were taken by the Mars Descent Imager on the mission's Curiosity rover while the rover was still suspended on a parachute, after the spacecraft had jettisoned the heat shield....
Wow now that is cool! Thanks for pointing that out.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/18/2012 08:59 PM
New grayscale images of the mountain! http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=12 including this one http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00012/opgs/edr/ncam/NLA_398561766EDR_F0030004NCAM00400M_.JPG
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: TheFallen on 08/18/2012 09:17 PM
I'd forgotten - until reminded by a USA friend - that my name (along with 1,246,445 other worldwide names) is etched  onto a microchip on board MSL Curiosity now parked inside Gale crater.

The microchips (there are two of them) are installed on the top deck of Curiosity... I'm sure they're visible in the images already downloaded and posted online, but I wonder when JPL will have the time to post an update specifically pointing out the location of the chips aboard the rover... (Pages were eventually posted on the Stardust, Kepler and Cassini mission sites with pics of the microchips and/or DVDs aboard them) :)

EDIT: I found the image below through Google. This pic is uploaded through the MSL mission site...but I can't find the specific page this photo is posted on. Hm.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/images/ChipCloseUptKSC.jpg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: TheFallen on 08/18/2012 11:58 PM
Persistence! I found the page...and the location of the chips on Curiosity ;D

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/participate/sendyournameTEMP4/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: js117 on 08/19/2012 12:31 AM
Will JPL ever drive MSL Curiosity to the landing site of the sky crane.
To far or of no interest.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/19/2012 12:43 AM
Will JPL ever drive MSL Curiosity to the landing site of the sky crane.
To far or of no interest.

Search the thread, been answered many times
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Duck on 08/19/2012 02:22 AM
Will JPL ever drive MSL Curiosity to the landing site of the sky crane.
To far or of no interest.

Hi Js, no - they don't plan on going over there... they've mentioned that they're worried the fuel etc. would contaminate the sensors on the rover.

I agree though, it sure would be awesome to see!  Maybe toward the end of the mission, after they're all finished with the other science experiments, they could head over there? :)

-Iain
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 08/19/2012 02:26 AM
Quote
after they're all finished with the other science experiments
You don't know how exploring other planets works, do you....
 :D


But no. Hydrazine from the Skycrane is like AIDS for MSL. It will be avoided. And there's no reason whatsoever to travel dozens of km off of Mt Sharp to see it, when there's no real science to be gathered there.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 08/19/2012 03:38 AM
If MSL notices a martian hazmat crew cleaning it up, it might be worth wandering over to watch...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 08/19/2012 04:07 AM
I agree though, it sure would be awesome to see!  Maybe toward the end of the mission, after they're all finished with the other science experiments, they could head over there? :)
The have consistently said they won't get close. However, MSL has some nice long lenses, and Grotzinger (IIRC) said in the last telecon that they would definitely take a look if they got line of sight on any of the hardware.

The descent stage crash site is about 600m away from the current position. Mastcam 100 is good for 7.4 cm/pixel at 1km. ChemCam RMI is also a pretty good telescope. It shouldn't take much of a rise on the way to Glenelg (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4482) to get a decent view.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/19/2012 07:21 AM
At the last teleconference, when asked, Grotzinger did say that they will take pictures of the crashed equipment if they get the opportunity from heights on the mound. (Pfuii, Hop just said that)

What's happened with the 140 kg fuel on board the sky crane? Could parts of it have combusted when in contact with oxidizing chemicals on the ground? Does it evaporate? Does it freeze? Does its status change from day to night?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/19/2012 07:39 AM
Concerning scientific value, they are quite interested in the little Goldburn scour because it scratched the surface bare. Hasn't the heat shield dug a much deeper pit? We've all seen that it threw a lot of materials around. Can anyone estimate how deep a crater it could've made? I think it was released at 238 m/s from 8 km altitude. Air resistance can almost be neglected, right? I can't find its mass, but it's large!
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/msl-20090710.html

Instead of landing heavy drilling equipment, they could just bomb the surface with high speed projectiles, dropped from orbiters at interesting targets, and let rovers examine the craters.


If I read the MRO images correctly, the heat shield is located only 3 times the distance to Glenelg, in the same direction, which is 130 degrees from the base of mount Sharp. Not far away at all!

EDIT: Actually, it's been said that Glenelg is 400 meters from MSL landing site, and that the heat shield is 1200 meters away. If so, it would only be about 800 meters from Glenelg to the heat shield crater. They are almost on a straight line, with no major obstacles, I gather. Going from Glenelg to the heat shield, would increase the distance to the base of mount Sharp by about 500 meters, so a visit there would result in a total extra driving of about 800+500 = 1300 meters. Wouldn't it be worth it, for the only chance to analyse fresh soil from maybe a meters depth? Also, it might be more interesting to drive to the base of mount Sharp closer along the dunes and mound.

Heat shield impact video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVLPXfF3l_U&feature=youtu.be
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/19/2012 02:02 PM
First mission targets:
http://www.spaceflight101.com/uploads/6/4/0/6/6406961/5333173.jpg?824
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/19/2012 02:50 PM
They don't wanna get near the heat shield because it contains carbon, I've learned now. I suppose it could disturb measurements of organic chemistry.

Aren't the Russians launching any Mars mission soon? They use to crash theirs, so NASA could ask them to crash the next one in Gale crater in order to get a nice fresh pit to scoop from... ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 08/19/2012 03:59 PM
Wouldn't it be worth it, for the only chance to analyse fresh soil from maybe a meters depth?

It won't be meters deep - this is not a large asteroid - it's a bit of lightweight aerospace structure that fell from rest from a few km at 1/2 g onto solid ground.

Actually, at 5 m/s2, 8000m, I get barely 280 m/s, even w/o atmosphere.

It will have disturbed the dust (eating up a bunch of energy), deformed, and then scratched the surface a little bit.

And on top of that, it's the one place on Mars that they know for sure contains a bunch of heat shield dust.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/19/2012 04:17 PM
First mission targets:
http://www.spaceflight101.com/uploads/6/4/0/6/6406961/5333173.jpg?824
Actually, this poor old rock might be zapped first (ChemCam zooms in on N165):
http://yfrog.com/oeuyhcevj
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/19/2012 05:45 PM
Uh-oh, we are ready to fire even before being ready to move?  :D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Kaputnik on 08/19/2012 05:46 PM
it's a bit of lightweight aerospace structure that fell from rest from a few km at 1/2 g onto solid ground.

Actually, at 5 m/s2, 8000m, I get barely 280 m/s, even w/o atmosphere.

Not arguing with your basic point, but I don't think it 'fell from rest'; the vehicle was moving at several hundred metres per second when it jettisoned the heatshield.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 08/19/2012 07:08 PM
it's a bit of lightweight aerospace structure that fell from rest from a few km at 1/2 g onto solid ground.

Actually, at 5 m/s2, 8000m, I get barely 280 m/s, even w/o atmosphere.

Not arguing with your basic point, but I don't think it 'fell from rest'; the vehicle was moving at several hundred metres per second when it jettisoned the heatshield.

Sure, though I'm not sure if it was all vertical.  over here:

http://www.spaceflight101.com/uploads/6/4/0/6/6406961/mars_science_laboratory.pdf

it says 280 m/s at separation, some of it vertical, some horizontal.  Then again, I also neglected aerodynamic forces.  If moving at ~300 m/s, even in 1% atmosphere, it will slow it down.

I guess by "at rest" I meant "not at any kind of re-entry speed" - I was just being sloppy.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/19/2012 10:09 PM
By Associated Press,

PASADENA, Calif. — NASA’s Curiosity rover has zapped its first Martian rock, aiming its laser for the sake of science.

During the target practice on Sunday. Curiosity fired 30 pulses at a nearby rock over a 10-second window, burning a small hole.


http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2012/08/19/now-you-will-feel-the-firepower-of-a-fully-armed-and-operational-mars-rover/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/target-practice-nasa-rover-curiosity-uses-laser-to-target-a-small-martian-rock/2012/08/19/11fc960a-ea42-11e1-866f-60a00f604425_story.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: BrightLight on 08/20/2012 02:48 AM
Now that's spectroscopy
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Helodriver on 08/20/2012 03:23 AM
Given the large mirror carried by the chemcam, just how much magnification is it capable of giving if used to observe distant targets? Could it be used in this way to produce ultra high resolution composite images similar to a gigapan picture?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Danderman on 08/20/2012 05:41 AM
During the target practice on Sunday. Curiosity fired 30 pulses at a nearby rock over a 10-second window, burning a small hole.

Oh dear, the first shots in a potential interplanetary war!

 :o :o
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/20/2012 12:24 PM
On the very top left of this Raw image (sol 12) , somebody found a short white streak in the sky. Could that be a star trail? A shooting star? Or even one of the orbiters? What are the exposure times of the MSL-Cameras anyway?

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 08/20/2012 02:29 PM
Given the large mirror carried by the chemcam, just how much magnification is it capable of giving if used to observe distant targets? Could it be used in this way to produce ultra high resolution composite images similar to a gigapan picture?

No, since the mirror is not in the optic path for visual instruments.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/20/2012 04:17 PM
Arm unstoved. Is this true!???
Surprise surprise! According to my calender anyway. Thumbnail below:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=NLA_398742207EDR_T0030004NCAM00105M_&s=14
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/20/2012 04:23 PM
Quote
The next scheduled media telecons are:
Tuesday, Aug. 21 and Thursday, Aug. 23, both at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT).

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1314
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: TheFallen on 08/20/2012 08:39 PM
Thumbail pics of Curiosity unstowing her robotic arm posted online

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=14
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: glanmor05 on 08/20/2012 08:59 PM
Arm unstoved. Is this true!???
Surprise surprise! According to my calender anyway. Thumbnail below:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=NLA_398742207EDR_T0030004NCAM00105M_&s=14


Yeah, I thought steering actuators and small drive came first? 

Not enough updates (from JPL) for me. Feed the beast!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/20/2012 11:19 PM
Given the large mirror carried by the chemcam, just how much magnification is it capable of giving if used to observe distant targets? Could it be used in this way to produce ultra high resolution composite images similar to a gigapan picture?

No, since the mirror is not in the optic path for visual instruments.

Chemcam actually does have a CCD recording from that mirror called the Remote Micro-Imager (ChemCam RMI), used for taking context shots of study targets.

It's uses a dichroic (passes some wavelengths, reflects others) tertiary mirror to split the incoming light between the CCD and the spectrometer.

A few details here:

http://msl-scicorner.jpl.nasa.gov/Instruments/ChemCam/

Quote
The Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) is intended as a context imager for the LIBS...It images through the same telescope as the LIBS...The detector is a 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD. The RMI has a field of view of 19 milliradians. Due to optimization of the telescope for LIBS, the RMI resolution is not pixel-limited, and is approximately 100 microradians.

Technical details here:
http://congrex.nl/icso/Papers/TPosters/12_dufour_icso_paper.pdf

If you divide the 19 milliradian field of view (diagonal) by the 100 microradian resolution and do some quick trigonometry, you will get only ~128 lines of horizontal resolution. In other words, the 1024x1024 pixel CCD significantly outresolves the telescope itself, but it was an already flight-proven sensor, and the extra pixels don't really harm the image, other than they show the ultimate limits of 4" telescope with such a narrow field of view (sensitivity for the spectrometers was the primary goal for this telescope, not resolution). In fact, you can see this as the blurriness of the raw images:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00013/opgs/edr/ccam/CR0_398646468EDR_F0030004CCAM05013M_.JPG

The ultimate answer to the question is yes, you could do ultra-resolution mosaics, with a resolution of about 1 mm at 10 meters (if I did my math right), but it's not the best use of bandwidth. Doing a 360 degree panorama just with the Mastcam takes several GB...on the order of a week's worth of bandwidth, I believe.

So instead what you would do is use the widest angle cameras on the mast - the Navcams - to take your panoramas. From those images, you select areas for the Mastcams to study in more detail. Only the most interesting areas would you likely take further shots of with the ChemCam RMI, and probably in conjunction with using the laser on those spots.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Sparky on 08/21/2012 04:46 AM
On the very top left of this Raw image (sol 12) , somebody found a short white streak in the sky. Could that be a star trail? A shooting star? Or even one of the orbiters? What are the exposure times of the MSL-Cameras anyway?

Perhaps Phobos?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: douglas100 on 08/21/2012 08:06 AM
Doubt it's Phobos. I guess the exposure would be less than a second  in daylight and Phobos wouldn't hardly move in that time.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/21/2012 08:07 AM
Cosmic rays reach the surface of Mars all the time.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/21/2012 06:48 PM
Quote
NASA media teleconference at 10:00 a.m. PDT (1:00 p.m. EDT), Tuesday, Aug. 21, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

Participants:
Michael Watkins - Curiosity mission manager, JPL
Louise Jandura - Sampling system lead engineer, JPL
Ashwin Vasavada - Curiosity deputy project scientist, JPL
Igor Mitrofanov - Principal investigator of DAN
Javier Gomez-Elvira - Principal investigator of REMS

Slides:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
Record will also be available here: http://www.ustream.tv/NASAJPL

Record: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/24867956

Have not listened to it yet, but it seems they have tested 100mm mastcam, unstowed and tested robotic arm, made first long weather and neutron measurements...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: litton4 on 08/21/2012 07:50 PM
Just seen on the BBC News ticker, report of "Damage" to some of the weather station sensors........

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19338870
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/21/2012 08:59 PM
The issue is related to some wind sensors on one of the booms, so wind measurements will be less accurate in cases when wind blows from the direction somewhat obscured by vertical mast (with only one boom available). http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia13646.html Other sensors are not affected, not a major problem but they will try to fix it.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 08/21/2012 09:01 PM
More from the BBC...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19338870
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/21/2012 10:09 PM
Hmm...sounds like something worth taking a shot of with MAHLI. I think the arm has enough dexterity to get a decent pointing in that direction.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/21/2012 11:16 PM
Media conference on NASA TV at Wednesday 11:30 a.m. pacific time?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/22/2012 01:43 AM
What It's Like to Land On Mars

Published on Aug 21, 2012 by JPLnews

This video steps viewers through a portion of the choreography needed to land NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars. It starts with a computer simulation from NASA's Eyes on the Solar System program and uses actual images from Curiosity's Mars Descent Imager. It ends with a high-resolution color image from Curiosity's Mast Camera.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMsdobLq1-4
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/22/2012 01:59 AM
JPL News feature: 2012-253                              Aug. 21, 2012

First Words of Safe Landing on Mars - Tango Delta Nominal

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-253&cid=release_2012-253

10:32 p.m. on the evening of Aug. 5 was turning out to be one long minute for Steve Sell. Of course, the previous six had been significantly protracted as well. When added together, the entry, descent and landing of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover had been touted as "Seven Minutes of Terror," and as far as Sell was concerned things were trending in that direction. What the 42-year-old engineer from Gettysburg, Pa., wanted more than anything in that seventh minute was to hear the words "UHF Strong."

There had been a debate amongst Curiosity's entry, descent and landing team about what their first words to indicate that the rover had reached the surface should be. The EDL team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory knew their microphones would be "hot" and that NASA TV was beaming the landing event out live to anybody with the desire and wherewithal to watch. They also knew that landing safely on Mars meant more than simply landing on Mars – which any one of the 34 engineers present at JPL’s Building 264 Room 230, also known as the “EDL War Room,” will tell you at great length is not simple at all. Their rocket-propelled backpack and rover-lowering Sky Crane system were getting their first all-up test 154 million miles (248 million kilometers) away from home, and there was still plenty that could go wrong even after the rover was gently placed on the surface… plenty.

What if the descent stage kept descending right on top of the rover? What if the bridles connecting the two did not separate? What if the algorithm used to throttle up the engines for the flyaway maneuver was not accurate?

It was the remaining "what ifs" that made what those first words from Mars confirming the rover was on the surface so important.

"If we said 'touchdown,' then people not intimately familiar with EDL might infer that Curiosity was good to go," said Sell. "But two more major calls had to be made before I could begin to breathe again."

At 10:31:45 p.m. PDT, Jody Davis saw the event record, or EVR, she was looking for appear on her computer screen in the EDL War Room. She knew that the "Touchdown" EVR would only be beamed down if the rover's descent stage had throttled down -- a result which could only occur if the descent stage had offloaded half its weight. The only way the rover could offload half its weight in an instant is if it were being held up from below.

Davis, a member of the EDL team and an engineer from NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia, gave the much reviewed, pre-scripted call -- "Tango Delta nominal."

Tango and Delta are phonetic identifiers for T and D, which the team used to represent touchdown.

One down, two to go, thought Sell. The next call the EDL team was looking for was "RIMU Stable."

"RIMU stands for Rover Inertial Measurement Unit," said Sell. "The RIMU gives us the rover's orientation as well as any movement it is making. If we landed on a crumbling crater wall or an unstable sand dune, or were being dragged by a still-connected descent stage across the surface, then the RIMU would show that in its data set."

The War Room's David Way, an engineer from JPL, was monitoring that unit's performance. Eight long seconds after Jody's call, he found the EVR he was looking for.

"RIMU Stable," said Way.

One more crucial milestone to go.

Not receiving that one final call would be something of a long shot to be sure. After all, the rover was down on the ground, and RIMU indicated it wasn't moving. Their system had been proven every step of the way so far. But everyone in the EDL War Room got as far as they did not only because they were excellent engineers, but because of their predilection for concocting unappetizing entry, descent and landing scenarios – and then figuring out how to elude them. And one ton of fuel-laden, rocket-firing descent stage climbing straight up, only to fall right back down on their factory-fresh landing site and an otherwise good-to-go, roving Mars laboratory was about as unappetizing a scenario as Sell could imagine.

That final confirmation would not come from Sell’s location. The final confirmation that Curiosity had landed clean would come 200 yards and one building away from the EDL War Room. There, in the Mission Support Area of JPL's Building 230, Adam Steltzner, the mission's EDL phase lead, was staring across the room at Brian Schwartz, who was not making eye contact with anyone. Schwartz, the EDL communications engineer, was staring at his screen. His task was not to check for a good-news EVR from the rover. Instead, he was waiting to see if the UHF signal became intermittent, faded away or just cut out altogether – all potential indications that the rover and descent stage had not gone their separate ways.

Eight seconds after the RIMU call – Schwartz looked up.

"UHF strong," said Schwartz.

With that, Steltzner had all the data he needed. Seated directly in front of the pacing EDL Phase Lead, Allen Chen felt a jab in the shoulder. Chen, the mission's (capsule communicator), knew it could only mean one thing.

"Touchdown confirmed," said Chen.

***
Epilogue
With time to reflect upon the events of August 5, Curiosity's EDL phase lead states only one thing fazed him that evening.

"The biggest surprise about EDL was there were no surprises," said Steltzner. "But soon after we were confirmed down, what I saw on the screen absolutely floored me."

Months, and even years before landing, Steltzner and his team had kicked around the idea of imaging the final moments of the descent stage's short life. Wouldn't it be cool if the rover's first pic could be timed just so?

Working with the surface operations team, they got the timing of the first images from the surface timed for about 40 seconds after landing – a little bit after the time the descent stage was estimated to impact the ground after flying away to a safe distance.

"We thought the odds were pretty small that we would see it," said Steltzner.

But there, right in the upper-middle of those first rear-hazcam images, was a plume of dust rising from the surface.

A later image, taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera, or HiRISE, aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft in Martian orbit, provides the location of what Curiosity team members believe is the final destination of the powered descent stage – or Sky Crane – which was programmed to fly away automatically after safely depositing the rover on the surface.

"With HiRISE we get the Sky Crane's distance and its compass heading with respect to the rover," said Steltzner. "The cloud seen in the distance on the Hazcam images is in perfect alignment with where we would expect to see the descent stage.

"The inescapable conclusion is that we captured the result of what happens when about 2,200 pounds (1,000 kilograms) of Sky Crane intersect with Martian surface at a pretty good clip. It is truly an amazing shot on a day full of amazing shots."

A video of imagery from the rover during EDL, including Adam Steltzner's commentary, is available at: http://1.usa.gov/NffoWl .

For more information on NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl and http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/msl . Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

DC Agle 818-393-9011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/22/2012 02:04 AM
JPL News release: 2012-254                                                                     Aug. 21, 2012

NASA's Curiosity Studies Mars Surroundings, Nears Drive

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-254&cid=release_2012-254

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has been investigating the Martian weather around it and the soil beneath it, as its controllers prepare for the car-size vehicle's first drive on Mars.

The rover's weather station, provided by Spain, checks air temperature, ground temperature, air pressure, wind and other variables every hour at the landing site in Gale Crater. On a typical Martian day, or "sol," based on measurements so far in the two-week old mission, air temperatures swing from 28 degrees to minus 103 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 2 to minus 75 Celsius). Ground temperatures change even more between afternoon and pre-dawn morning, from 37 degrees to minus 132 degrees Fahrenheit (3 to minus 91 Celsius).

"We will learn about changes from day to day and season to season," said Javier Gómez-Elvira of the Centro de Astrobiología, Madrid, Spain, principal investigator for the suite of weather sensors called the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS).

Within a week or so, daily Mars weather reports from Curiosity will become available at: http://cab.inta-csic.es/rems/marsweather.html  or http://bit.ly/RzQe6p  .

One of the two sets of REMS wind sensors is not providing data. "One possibility is that pebbles lofted during the landing hit the delicate circuit boards on one of the two REMS booms," said Curiosity Deputy Project Scientist Ashwin Vasavada of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "We will have to be more clever about using the remaining wind sensor to get wind speed and direction."

An instrument provided by Russia is checking for water bound into minerals in the top three feet (one meter) of soil beneath the rover. It employs a technology that is used in oil prospecting on Earth, but had never before been sent to another planet.

"Curiosity has begun shooting neutrons into the ground," said Igor Mitrofanov of Space Research Institute, Moscow, principal investigator for this instrument, called the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons, or DAN. "We measure the amount of hydrogen in the soil by observing how the neutrons are scattered, and hydrogen on Mars is an indicator of water."

The most likely hydrogen to be found in shallow ground of Gale Crater, near the Martian equator, is in hydrated minerals. These are minerals with water molecules, or related ions, bound into the crystalline structure of rocks. They can tenaciously retain water from a wetter past after all free water has gone.

Curiosity will soon have a different patch of ground beneath it. Today, the six-wheeled rover wiggled its four corner wheels side to side for the first time on Mars, as a test of the steering actuators on those wheels. This was critical preparation for Curiosity's first drive on Mars.

"Late tonight, we plan to send Curiosity the commands for doing our first drive tomorrow," said Curiosity Mission Manager Michael Watkins of JPL.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to Mars on Aug. 5, PDT (Aug. 6, EDT). In a two-year prime mission researchers are using the rover's 10 instruments to assess whether the selected study area has ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life and for preserving evidence about whether life has existed.

The mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The rover was designed, developed and assembled at JPL, a division of Caltech. More information about Curiosity is online at: http://www.nasa.gov/msl .

You can follow the mission on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

Guy Webster / D.C. Agle 818-354-6278 / 818-393-9011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / agle@jpl.nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/22/2012 02:05 AM
JPL News release: 2012-255a                                                                     Aug. 21, 2012

NASA to Hold Televised Curiosity Rover Media Briefing Aug. 22

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-255&cid=release_2012-255

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will hold a televised news conference at 11:30 a.m. PDT (2:30 p.m. EDT) on Wednesday, Aug. 22, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., to update media on the progress of its Curiosity rover mission on Mars.

The news conference will be broadcast live on NASA TV and online at: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

For more information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity mission for NASA.

D.C. Agle/Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/22/2012 02:22 AM
JPL News release: 2012-255a                                                                     Aug. 21, 2012

NASA to Hold Televised Curiosity Rover Media Briefing Aug. 22

Yay, televised!  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/22/2012 07:20 AM
First things broke on MSL: http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19338870

Maybe it was not a good idea to rout cables on the surface of the deck?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/22/2012 07:39 AM
I love the redundancy on board Curiosity! A wind sensor broke down, but hey, there's another one! Two computers, double set of cameras everywhere, an engine at each wheel, four steering wheels, two batteries, an essentially indestructable power source, three antennas and so on. Even spare drill bits. This baby might rove for decades! Most critical and vulnerable part is probably the arm. But that kind of mechanics should be straight forward and rugged. And even without it, at least the atmosphere can be analyzed. How could this fail once landed?

Interplanetary landings used to be like: "Uhu, lost radio contact, don't know why". But with Curiosity, they can image and count each piece of dust that lies on top of it. It's too much to say that this kind of technology has matured, but it has come a very long way since they had the ambition in the 1960s to just crash land anything on the Moon, but missed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/22/2012 09:14 AM
JPL News feature: 2012-253                              Aug. 21, 2012

First Words of Safe Landing on Mars - Tango Delta Nominal

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-253&cid=release_2012-253

I had to go back and re-watch the control room video landing after reading this, because I swore there was a touchdown call and everyone started cheering, and I found myself yelling at the screen to be quiet so I could hear the calls for throttle down and separation.

As it turns out, there was a touchdown call, but only after the events called out in the article.

Good read. For the level of inside detail, I'd have almost thought Chris wrote it.  8)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: BuDkaR on 08/22/2012 10:46 AM
JPL News feature: 2012-253                              Aug. 21, 2012

First Words of Safe Landing on Mars - Tango Delta Nominal

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-253&cid=release_2012-253

I had to go back and re-watch the control room video landing after reading this, because I swore there was a touchdown call and everyone started cheering, and I found myself yelling at the screen to be quiet so I could hear the calls for throttle down and separation.

As it turns out, there was a touchdown call, but only after the events called out in the article.

Good read. For the level of inside detail, I'd have almost thought Chris wrote it.  8)

I heard "Touchdown confirmed, we're safe on Mars"  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dvicari on 08/22/2012 11:14 AM
Maybe it was not a good idea to rout cables on the surface of the deck?

It is not the cable bundles that were damaged, a pebble couldn't hurt those. It is small exposed wires in the sensor elements. I believe the senors measure heat loss rates to the atmosphere to determine wind speed

My understanding is there are six transducers (three on each boom) and two of the six were damaged. The two damaged ones were exposed during sky crane... the other four were covered.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 12:25 PM
So what else did they say in the telecon? Any image/slide/video?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: rdale on 08/22/2012 01:12 PM
So what else did they say in the telecon?

Most of it has been covered, you might need to listen to it all if you want everything?

Quote
Any image/slide/video?

Yes, in the post with the link to the audio recording where it says slides.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: elmarko on 08/22/2012 01:52 PM
Maybe it was not a good idea to rout cables on the surface of the deck?

It is not the cable bundles that were damaged, a pebble couldn't hurt those. It is small exposed wires in the sensor elements. I believe the senors measure heat loss rates to the atmosphere to determine wind speed

My understanding is there are six transducers (three on each boom) and two of the six were damaged. The two damaged ones were exposed during sky crane... the other four were covered.


Was that ever noticed as a potential problem? Why were those two uncovered?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dvicari on 08/22/2012 02:00 PM
Was that ever noticed as a potential problem? Why were those two uncovered?

The mast being down protected the others.

I'm guessing they didn't expect to throw small rocks around that much during landing. They probably should have been protected with covers or stowed like all the cameras were.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: elmarko on 08/22/2012 02:01 PM
But then that adds more complexity etc to shift those covers off, I guess.

Ah well.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:26 PM
liutenant Uura from strtrek just advertised on NASA TV!!!
News conference is upcoming in next minutes.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/22/2012 06:29 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lee Jay on 08/22/2012 06:30 PM
Maybe it was not a good idea to rout cables on the surface of the deck?

It is not the cable bundles that were damaged, a pebble couldn't hurt those. It is small exposed wires in the sensor elements. I believe the senors measure heat loss rates to the atmosphere to determine wind speed

So, basically hot-film or hot-wire anemometers?  Those things are very delicate.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:35 PM
Started.
sol 16, Ray Bradbury celebrated by a footage.

Landing site named "Bradbury landing"
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:38 PM
Summary of past sol displayed.
Al nominal, but the wind sensor.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:38 PM
First drive was planned for september, but we already had it today!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/22/2012 06:39 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:40 PM
First scoop sample planned for september.

First-walk panorama shown.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:41 PM
3d animation of walk shown.
2,5 meters: stright on, turn left, stright on, go back, then back to start positoin.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/22/2012 06:42 PM
First drive completed
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:43 PM
Video explanation of laser and chemcam working.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:43 PM
Plasma looks different on Mars (brighter than on Earth).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:44 PM
Showing first fired/analyzed rock.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:45 PM
Still lores imgs, waiting mastcam.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/22/2012 06:46 PM
First ChemCam
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:47 PM
Showing spectral analysis of plasma producedb by laser firing on rock.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:48 PM
Detailed images of a "scour". To be laser-analyzed?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:50 PM
Correct: scour already laser-analyzed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/22/2012 06:51 PM
2nd Chem Cam target (Scour)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 06:58 PM
Questions time.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/22/2012 07:03 PM
Drive lasted 16 minutes with 4 or 5 minutes driving and the rest of the time taking pictures.

Track marks show the ground is firm.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/22/2012 07:10 PM
Chem Cam capable of 20 analysis per day.

First drives expected to be in the range of 10m at a time to be eventually extended to 100m at a time.

Team very excited everything working well.  Pete expressing caution and reminding everyone that there is still a long way to go.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/22/2012 07:29 PM
Damn, MSL has same speed of Spirit! 4 cm/s! I really hoped it was a bit faster!
It will require a(nother) whole life to go around! 0,144 km/h! How far is Mount Sharp?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/22/2012 07:45 PM
Quote
NASA televised news conference at 11:30 a.m. PDT (2:30 p.m. EDT) on Wednesday, Aug. 22, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., to update media on the progress of its Curiosity rover mission on Mars.

Attached audio record until video record comes in.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 08/22/2012 07:49 PM
Curiosity Rover Mission Update - August 22
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7795
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/22/2012 08:17 PM
Curiosity Rover: First Drive Celebration

Published on Aug 22, 2012 by JPLnews

Team members celebrate in the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Curiosity Surface Mission Support Area (SMSA) when images are received confirming the rover's first drive on Mars on Aug. 22, 2012.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEhFinlRMBM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/22/2012 09:35 PM
Just thought I'd throw in two of the images relevant to the presser for those who want to see the high res. These have captions that are decently informative.

Plasma looks different on Mars (brighter than on Earth).

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4540

Showing spectral analysis of plasma producedb by laser firing on rock.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4540
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: MP99 on 08/22/2012 09:50 PM
Damn, MSL has same speed of Spirit! 4 cm/s! I really hoped it was a bit faster!
It will require a(nother) whole life to go around! 0,144 km/h! How far is Mount Sharp?

That means it would only take 7 hours to go 1 km.

Control algorithms seem far more important than speed-over-ground, to me.

cheers, Martin
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/22/2012 11:00 PM
Damn, MSL has same speed of Spirit! 4 cm/s! I really hoped it was a bit faster!
It will require a(nother) whole life to go around! 0,144 km/h! How far is Mount Sharp?

That means it would only take 7 hours to go 1 km.

Control algorithms seem far more important than speed-over-ground, to me.

cheers, Martin

Not that it produces anywhere near enough power to drive a kilometer in 7 hours.

Design range is 200 meters per day, and most days will be far below that.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: js117 on 08/22/2012 11:30 PM
Damn, MSL has same speed of Spirit! 4 cm/s! I really hoped it was a bit faster!
It will require a(nother) whole life to go around! 0,144 km/h! How far is Mount Sharp?

That means it would only take 7 hours to go 1 km.

Control algorithms seem far more important than speed-over-ground, to me.

cheers, Martin

Remember there is 28 minute delay in single.
14 minute transmit time and 14 minute return time.
So you can't do anything wrong.
That is why the slow speed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Pheogh on 08/22/2012 11:35 PM
Weren't the navcams going to be capable of 15fps video? Am I imagining that. I could have swore one of the other cameras besides MARDI were capable of sequential imaging?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 08/23/2012 12:02 AM
By Alan Boyle
 
You've seen it before, but not like this: Visual-effects specialist Daniel Luke Fitch has assembled the high-resolution imagery showing the Curiosity rover's descent to Mars this month into a YouTube video that's as slick as his highlights reel.

The video takes advantage of pictures captured by the Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, which is positioned on the bottom of the rover. During the "seven minutes of terror" leading up to Curiosity's landing on Aug. 5, MARDI recorded hundreds of still frames and stored them in the rover's memory. Thumbnail versions of the pictures were quickly sent back to Earth and turned into a low-resolution movie, but it's taken days to reserve the bandwidth required for transmitting the full-resolution frames.


http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/08/22/13419779-watch-the-rover-fall-to-mars-in-hd


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZX5GRPnd4U&feature=plcp


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/23/2012 12:25 AM
Just thought I'd throw in two of the images relevant to the presser for those who want to see the high res. These have captions that are decently informative.

Plasma looks different on Mars (brighter than on Earth).

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4540

Showing spectral analysis of plasma producedb by laser firing on rock.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4540

As far as I'm concerned, that one analysis was worth its weight in gold. Fabulous instrument. I'm sure the designers & constructors are tickled to see it in action! Great work.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/23/2012 11:09 AM
As far as I'm concerned, that one analysis was worth its weight in gold. Fabulous instrument. I'm sure the designers & constructors are tickled to see it in action! Great work.

I'd say an individual analysis isn't fantastic on its own. My understanding is the measurements from ChemCam have a relatively low sensitivity. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer can provide much better results, but it's a contact instrument, so it requires driving up to a target and placing the APXS, which means both planning a drive and an arm operation, then sitting still for 15 minutes to several hours for the observation.

In comparison, in the very first ChemCam operation, it analyzed three targets in less time than it would take to drive to and place the arm on a single target. So it will increase the number of targets they're able to get basic data on very significantly, and save them time by allowing them to reserve APXS operations for targets already shown by ChemCam to be interesting. That makes it a fantastic instrument, probably worth far more than its weight in platinum.

Mini-TES on the Mars Exploration Rovers served a somewhat similar purpose, but could only identify basic mineralogy instead of detailed elemental composition.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/23/2012 02:36 PM
Made a simple panorama of mt. Sharp with the new images
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 08/23/2012 02:55 PM
Thanks, I noticed the new raw images of the mountain this morning.  Nice panorama.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Plopper on 08/23/2012 02:56 PM
Wow, Fixer! Beautiful image! And that's Mars.
But, it isn't Mons Aeolis proper is it? It's a hill of about 4 km height over the crater bottom on the mound surrounding Mons Aeolis (Mount Sharp). The true 5.5 km high summit of the real mountain, is out of sight for the rover, behind and a bit to the right of the peak of that mound in your image, and might remain so for the entire mission.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/23/2012 05:50 PM
Weren't the navcams going to be capable of 15fps video? Am I imagining that. I could have swore one of the other cameras besides MARDI were capable of sequential imaging?

The mastcams are capable of 10 fps. Expect this to be used sparingly due to the bandwidth involved. It's possible we'll get a few sequences of arm deployments or driving, but nothing has been promised. One of the planned uses is catching dust devils in action, assuming they occur regular at this location as they have where the MER's landed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/23/2012 06:27 PM
Do we eventually have a full res version of the 360° panorama shot in first sols? Or it was not at all a full-360° and we'll never see it? I only see "fake" full-color panoramas made by stitching and colorizing navcam images!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/23/2012 07:03 PM
...and finally a high definition version form JPL.

Curiosity Drops in on Mars in High-Res

Published on Aug 23, 2012 by JPLnews

This movie from NASA's Curiosity rover shows most of the high-resolution frames acquired by the Mars Descent Imager between the jettison of the heat shield and touchdown.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1ebHThBdlY
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/23/2012 07:27 PM
Now that I know of the "encrypted" comment (T.D. nominal, RIMU stable, UHF good), hearing the audio makes it a lot more interesting to look at just some pebbles in the background.
I also think someone in the room was "muted" upon getting already enthusiast for "T.D. nominal" ("sssshhh! It's too early to speak!!") :-) .

Now somebody should prepare a video showing what could have gone wrong: skycrane crashing on the rover, or flying away before ropes are cut, and so on... :-)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/23/2012 07:38 PM
2160p (!!!) MARDI video syncronized with audio and simulation!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZuzSxQ_Zeg&feature=youtu.be
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/23/2012 07:39 PM
Now somebody should prepare a video showing what could have gone wrong: skycrane crashing on the rover, or flying away before ropes are cut, and so on... :-)

I think the documentary called "Martian Mega Rover" has some cute CGI video of some of those scenarios, although it depicts the rover landing on a pretty big slope even in the normal scenario.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ScientificMethod on 08/23/2012 08:07 PM
By Alan Boyle
 
You've seen it before, but not like this: {snip}
http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/08/22/13419779-watch-the-rover-fall-to-mars-in-hd


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZX5GRPnd4U&feature=plcp




In full HD, you really get a vivid view of how much thrust there was in the last few feet of the skycrane. With 20/20 hindsight, it's not to hard to see why pebbles and debris would be thrown on the top of Curiosity.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/23/2012 09:21 PM
Wonderful video. Although for an update thread, we can place priority on the specific video and image threads to keep everything nice and tidy.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Fixer on 08/23/2012 10:19 PM
Have no words... Look at that http://www.db-prods.net/blog/2012/08/20/le-panorama-en-couleur-de-curiosity-enfin-complet/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: TheFallen on 08/24/2012 01:13 AM
Have no words... Look at that http://www.db-prods.net/blog/2012/08/20/le-panorama-en-couleur-de-curiosity-enfin-complet/

Awesome. Though I'm waiting for a color panorama that actually includes the rover in it. Just saying :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 08/24/2012 01:56 PM
Jumpjack, thanks for the synchronized video!

Where's the "like" button? :)

Took me back to landing night, to the nailbiting moments then the celebration.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: rickyjames on 08/24/2012 03:40 PM
As far as I'm concerned, that one analysis was worth its weight in gold...

That makes it a fantastic instrument, probably worth far more than its weight in platinum....

Actually at the moment gold is worth more (around $1660 per ounce) than platinum (around $1540 per ounce).  But the worth on Mars of Curiosity is $2,500,000,000 / (1982 pounds * 16 oz /lb) = $78,835 per ounce or around 48 times its worth on Earth if it were all made of solid gold.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: pippin on 08/24/2012 04:05 PM
Awesome. Though I'm waiting for a color panorama that actually includes the rover in it. Just saying :)

Have a look further up the thread for the one I linked. If you've got an iPad it's even stunningly interactive.

EDIT:
Here it is again:
http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lee Jay on 08/24/2012 06:08 PM
Awesome. Though I'm waiting for a color panorama that actually includes the rover in it. Just saying :)

Have a look further up the thread for the one I linked. If you've got an iPad it's even stunningly interactive.

EDIT:
Here it is again:
http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2 (http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2)

You don't need an iPad.  It's interactive on my Windows 7 PC just fine.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/24/2012 07:29 PM
Advisory: 2012-258b                                                                     Aug. 24, 2012

NASA Announces Aug. 27 Mars News Conference

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-258b&cid=release_2012-258b

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will hold a televised news conference at 2 p.m. PDT (5 p.m.EDT), Monday, Aug. 27, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., about the activities of its Curiosity rover mission on Mars. The event will feature new images, an update of the rover's progress, and a special greeting by NASA Administrator Charles Bolden.

Televised news conferences are broadcast live on NASA TV and online at: http://www.nasa.gov/ and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl

The Mars Curiosity team is operating on Mars time. The Martian day is about 40 minutes longer than an Earth day. Media events are scheduled based on team availability and are subject to change. Updates of event times will be posted at:

http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon

For information about NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, including the Curiosity rover, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl

D.C. Agle/Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: go4mars on 08/26/2012 05:53 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3V00dKs40k&feature=autoplay&list=PL57B8D5FFF5B55A62&playnext=1

Dr. Jim Bell goes through a brief notion of where MSL will be going.  Starting around 21 minutes. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: TheFallen on 08/26/2012 06:05 AM
Awesome. Though I'm waiting for a color panorama that actually includes the rover in it. Just saying :)

Have a look further up the thread for the one I linked. If you've got an iPad it's even stunningly interactive.

EDIT:
Here it is again:
http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2

Nice work. But I meant a true-color panorama... Not a colorized Navcam image. Sorry for being so finicky  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/26/2012 09:24 AM
Awesome. Though I'm waiting for a color panorama that actually includes the rover in it. Just saying :)

Have a look further up the thread for the one I linked. If you've got an iPad it's even stunningly interactive.

EDIT:
Here it is again:
http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2

Nice work. But I meant a true-color panorama... Not a colorized Navcam image. Sorry for being so finicky  :)

You might be waiting a while. The mastcams trade more resolution for a narrower field of view compared to the navcams. The result is a full panorama takes almost 10 times as many images, and consequently 10 times as much data return. They've got generally in the range of 250-800 MB worth of bandwidth available per sol, but Malin says that a 360 degree x 80 degree panorama will take about 2.5 GB worth of raw images (the source didn't specify, so that might have been for the 100mm mastcam, not the 34mm).

Hence why the mastcam panorama we have so far is substantially cropped in the vertical.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/26/2012 12:42 PM
I hate fake-color navcam images indeed. What's the meaning of them? They could also be green- or blue-colorized!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: pippin on 08/26/2012 01:28 PM
You don't need an iPad.  It's interactive on my Windows 7 PC just fine.

Yes, but if you haven't seen it on an iPad with the gyro feature enabled (default) and everything you don't even know what I mean. Believe me.
"Interactive" as on a PC or Mac is nothing compared to that. Dragging a picture around on a screen with a mouse is no "wow" effect. Turning around on an office chair and looking at the image like through a window IS.

Don't know whether it would work on an Android tablet as well, don't have one.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/26/2012 01:30 PM
Augmented reality on Mars?!?
Cool! :-)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 08/26/2012 08:59 PM
You don't need an iPad.  It's interactive on my Windows 7 PC just fine.

Yes, but if you haven't seen it on an iPad with the gyro feature enabled (default) and everything you don't even know what I mean. Believe me.
"Interactive" as on a PC or Mac is nothing compared to that. Dragging a picture around on a screen with a mouse is no "wow" effect. Turning around on an office chair and looking at the image like through a window IS.

Don't know whether it would work on an Android tablet as well, don't have one.
Works on iPhone. :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 08/27/2012 01:58 PM
WHOW!!! Now THAT's awsome! I hope JPL provides us with frequent panoramas like this every now and then. With your iphone moving in front of you it seems as if you really are on mars...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:13 PM
News conference startd.
AMAZING full color mastcam images of far targets (up to 16 km)
A picture shows how big (small) the rover would look upon reaching a far target.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:15 PM
Speaker appears excited at looking from grounwhat he only viewed from orbit till now.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:15 PM
Lots of layer visible.
Comparison with terrestrial Gran Canyon's layers.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:18 PM
Explanation of science instruments onboard:
QMS, GC, ...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:19 PM
TLS, SSIT,...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:19 PM
Paul Mahaffy, principal investigator of the SAM instrument, is describing them.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:19 PM
http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl
Question time starting within 5 minutes.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:23 PM
Overview on MSL communications by  Chad Edwards, chief telecommunications engineer for NASA's Mars Exploration Program
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:26 PM
7 GB MRO and 3 GB odyssey: data amount relayed till now.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:26 PM
Question time
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/27/2012 09:28 PM
Images from the presser
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:30 PM
Returned data:
(http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/images/PIA16107_Edwards3-br.jpg)

Rover as it would appear from this site:
(http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/images/PIA16105_malin04ano-br.jpg)

Targets distances:
(http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/images/PIA16104malin06anno-br.jpg)

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lee Jay on 08/27/2012 09:35 PM
7 GB MRO and 3 GB odyssey: data amount relayed till now.

Maybe I missed it, but I thought those were Gb (gigabits), not GB (gigabytes).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/27/2012 09:35 PM
Latest picture of the rover positioned over the scour.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 08/27/2012 09:35 PM
Here's the news on that song they are going to plan from Mars:

MEDIA ADVISORY: M12-160

NASA JOINS MUSICIAN WILL.I.AM, DISCOVERY EDUCATION FOR PREMIERE OF SONG FROM MARS

WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold an educational event to share findings
about Mars with students and premiere a new song by musician
will.i.am that will be broadcast from the surface of the Red Planet
via the Curiosity rover. The event will take place at 1 p.m. PDT (4
p.m. EDT) Tuesday, Aug. 28, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
in Pasadena, Calif.

Members of the team that successfully landed the rover on Mars earlier
this month will explain to students the mission and the technology
behind the song's interplanetary transmission. will.i.am will then
premiere "Reach for the Stars," a new composition about the singer's
passion for science, technology and space exploration.

will.i.am's i.am.angel Foundation, in partnership with Discovery
Education of Silver Spring, Md., a provider of digital resources to
kindergarten through grade 12 classrooms, will announce a new
science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics initiative
featuring NASA assets such as the Mars Curiosity Rover.

The event will be streamed on the agency's website and broadcast on
NASA TV at:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

Media attending the event will be able to ask questions. Media
interested in attending must contact the JPL Media Relations office
by 9 a.m. PDT, Tuesday at 818-354-5011. Reporters who have responded
must arrive by 11:30 a.m. for admittance to the event. JPL is located
at 4800 Oak Grove Drive.

NASA's Curiosity rover continues to reach new milestones as it begins
its exploration mission to help scientists discover if Mars has ever
been hospitable to life.

For more information about Curiosity and Mars exploration, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/mars

For more information about NASA's education programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education


-end-

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/27/2012 09:40 PM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/27/2012 09:51 PM
7 GB MRO and 3 GB odyssey: data amount relayed till now.

Maybe I missed it, but I thought those were Gb (gigabits), not GB (gigabytes).
you could be right, hence it would be 700MB and 300 MB.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: aero on 08/27/2012 11:57 PM
7 GB MRO and 3 GB odyssey: data amount relayed till now.

Maybe I missed it, but I thought those were Gb (gigabits), not GB (gigabytes).
you could be right, hence it would be 700MB and 300 MB.


Haven't we seen more photographic data than that?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: seanpg71 on 08/28/2012 12:19 AM
...
you could be right, hence it would be 700MB and 300 MB.


Generally a byte would be 8 bits.  And usually Gb = 1,000,000,000 bits whereas 1GB is generally 1,073,741,824 bytes.

Bits are usually used in sequential transmission rates.  Whereas bytes are usually used for file sizes.

So, while I don't know anything about this situation specifically - I'd assume it's probably GB.  And if not, that it would be 834MB and 358MB, not 700 and 300.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lee Jay on 08/28/2012 12:30 AM
This (posted above) has a lower-case b in it, which means bits.  Upper-case means Bytes.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/images/PIA16107_Edwards3-br.jpg

So, it's a little over 7Gb TOTAL (around 850 megabytes).

Image data is losslessly compressed, relatively low-res (1600x1200 per image) and monchrome, so it's not all that big compared to the images we're used to with modern digital cameras.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 08/28/2012 12:36 AM
...
you could be right, hence it would be 700MB and 300 MB.


Generally a byte would be 8 bits.  And usually Gb = 1,000,000,000 bits whereas 1GB is generally 1,073,741,824 bytes.

Bits are usually used in sequential transmission rates.  Whereas bytes are usually used for file sizes.

So, while I don't know anything about this situation specifically - I'd assume it's probably GB.  And if not, that it would be 834MB and 358MB, not 700 and 300.

You mean Gibibytes (GiB), not Gigabytes. ;) (Giga is an SI prefix that literally means 10^9, not 10.24^9 like some people use it as...)

(Of course, I'm not being serious... While my point is literally correct, I myself don't usually use the term Gibibytes...)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: aero on 08/28/2012 12:51 AM
On the graph posted above, it looks to me like the ordinate is labled Mb, but the graph is hard to read ...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: david1971 on 08/28/2012 08:08 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/28/us/mars-curiosity-voice/index.html?hpt=hp_c2

"Curiosity already is sending back more data from the surface of Mars than the combined results of all of NASA's previous rovers, the space agency said Monday."

Is this really true?  Has MSL really sent back more data in a few weeks than Spirit and Opportunity did in a combined decade-and-a-half?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/28/2012 09:26 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/28/us/mars-curiosity-voice/index.html?hpt=hp_c2

"Curiosity already is sending back more data from the surface of Mars than the combined results of all of NASA's previous rovers, the space agency said Monday."

Is this really true?  Has MSL really sent back more data in a few weeks than Spirit and Opportunity did in a combined decade-and-a-half?

No it's up to the same point in their respective missions not the full lifetime of the MER rovers.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/28/2012 11:28 AM
Are chat sessions from ustream downloadable once they finish? I missed a lot of NASA answers in yesterday chat mess...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 08/28/2012 01:49 PM
Are chat sessions from ustream downloadable once they finish? I missed a lot of NASA answers in yesterday chat mess...

If you mean the press briefing John44 has posted it at

 http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7803:nasa-science-curiosity-mission-news-conference-august-27&catid=1:latest
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/28/2012 02:24 PM
No, there's a text chat window during ustream conference, i 'd like to have a transcript.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stan Black on 08/28/2012 06:47 PM
 Did any one catch P.M. with Eddie Mair on Radio 4 in the U.K.? David Oh talked about being on Martian time.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b01m5jvl
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: collectSPACE on 08/29/2012 12:39 AM
Signals from Mars: NASA's Curiosity rover radios will.i.am song in music first
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-082812a.html

In a first for music and space history, a song has been broadcast back to Earth from the surface of another planet. On Tuesday, students gathered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to hear "Reach for the Stars" by musician will.i.am after it was transmitted by the Curiosity rover on Mars.

A well-known advocate of science education, will.i.am told collectSPACE he hoped the song would encourage and remind them just how important their involvement in the sciences is to the future.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgQ4aXzhvHw
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: tigerade on 08/29/2012 01:07 AM
While I appreciate will.i.am's space advocacy, his music is awful, this song included.  Never been a black eyed peas fan.  I wish NASA would have picked a better song, and I'm glad there are no Martians to listen to the broadcast, or they'd be very mad at us.   ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 08/29/2012 02:31 AM
While I appreciate will.i.am's space advocacy, his music is awful, this song included.  Never been a black eyed peas fan.  I wish NASA would have picked a better song, and I'm glad there are no Martians to listen to the broadcast, or they'd be very mad at us.   ;)

I thought it was allright. Considering the target audience, they probably 'Will' like it  ;)

It's exposure in a good way, something NASA needs to continue doing. I applaud their efforts.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/29/2012 11:19 AM
Awesome. Though I'm waiting for a color panorama that actually includes the rover in it. Just saying :)

Have a look further up the thread for the one I linked. If you've got an iPad it's even stunningly interactive.

EDIT:
Here it is again:
http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2
How do you see these panoramas in ipad? Just loading the web page or is there a specific app? Does it exist an android app which uses accelerometer for immersve effect?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: pippin on 08/29/2012 11:31 AM
Just load the web page, no App required so I would have hopes that Android works as well, but I didn't try.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Crispy on 08/29/2012 12:44 PM
I think you need an ipad 2 or 3. Doesn't work on my 1.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Duck on 08/29/2012 04:27 PM
When I asked about video coming back from the descent, I got raked over the coals about bandwidth and blah blah blah. How do they have bandwidth then to go friviously sending song files back and forth?  What's the point of that?

-Iain
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 08/29/2012 04:44 PM
When I asked about video coming back from the descent, I got raked over the coals about bandwidth and blah blah blah.

"Blah blah blah" constituting 140 megabytes of MARDI data returned so far and it's still not complete. How much do you think a single music file took?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Duck on 08/29/2012 07:05 PM
5-10 MByte, which would account for 1/6 to 1/3 of a day's bandwidth...

-Iain
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 08/29/2012 07:07 PM
I thought the MARDI video was complete. Are they still downloading post-landing MARDI images?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Moe Grills on 08/29/2012 07:34 PM
Images from the presser

 :o

WOW!!! Those images are excellent!!!

It's almost as if those images were taken in Utah or Arizona.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 08/29/2012 09:13 PM
RELEASE: 12-301

NASA CURIOSITY ROVER BEGINS EASTBOUND TREK ON MARTIAN SURFACE

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has set off from its
landing vicinity on a trek to a science destination about a
quarter-mile (400 meters) away, where it may begin using its drill.

The rover drove eastward about 52 feet (16 meters) on Tuesday, its
22nd Martian day after landing. This third drive was longer than
Curiosity's first two drives combined. The previous drives tested the
mobility system and positioned the rover to examine an area scoured
by exhaust from one of the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft engines
that placed the rover on the ground.

"This drive really begins our journey toward the first major driving
destination, Glenelg, and it's nice to see some Martian soil on our
wheels," said mission manager Arthur Amador of NASA's Jet Propulsion
Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. "The drive went beautifully,
just as our rover planners designed it."

Glenelg is a location where three types of terrain intersect.
Curiosity's science team chose it as a likely place to find a first
rock target for drilling and analysis.

"We are on our way, though Glenelg is still many weeks away," said
Curiosity Project Scientist John Grotzinger of the California
Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena. "We plan to stop for
just a day at the location we just reached, but in the next week or
so we will make a longer stop."

During the longer stop at a site still to be determined, Curiosity
will test its robotic arm and the contact instruments at the end of
the arm. At the location reached Tuesday, Curiosity's Mast Camera
(Mastcam) will collect a set of images toward the mission's ultimate
driving destination, the lower slope of nearby Mount Sharp. A mosaic
of images from the current location will be used along with the
Mastcam images of the mountain taken at the spot where Curiosity
touched down, Bradbury Landing. This stereo pair taken about 33 feet
(10 meters) apart will provide three-dimensional information about
distant features and possible driving routes.

Curiosity is three weeks into a two-year prime mission on Mars. It
will use 10 science instruments to assess whether the selected study
area ever has offered environmental conditions favorable for
microbial life. JPL, a division of Caltech, manages the mission for
NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

More information about Curiosity is online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

and

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl

You can follow the mission on Facebook and on Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

and

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 08/30/2012 01:08 AM
Signals from Mars: NASA's Curiosity rover radios will.i.am song in music first
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-082812a.html

Choosing to not only include, but autotune the mating call of the white rhinoceros at about 1:30 is bold and unprecedented composition choice.

That's pretty much the nicest thing I can say about the song.


When I asked about video coming back from the descent, I got raked over the coals about bandwidth and blah blah blah. How do they have bandwidth then to go friviously sending song files back and forth?  What's the point of that?

-Iain

I bet they sent it highly compressed...maybe as small as 25 kbps, which would come in at just under 1 MB.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: block51 on 08/30/2012 11:46 AM

When I asked about video coming back from the descent, I got raked over the coals about bandwidth and blah blah blah. How do they have bandwidth then to go friviously sending song files back and forth?  What's the point of that?
-Iain

I bet they sent it highly compressed...maybe as small as 25 kbps, which would come in at just under 1 MB.

Also, education and educational outreach activities are a fairly important (not arguing for or against personally...) part of what NASA sees as its job. Devoting a significant portion of data downlink capability for one day is probably well worth the cost in many NASA higher up's eyes.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/30/2012 07:13 PM
I think it was a "camouflaged" test for audio back-transmission , for future manned missions to Mars.
Sending data is one thing, sending images in another thing, sending audio recording is another thing, sending back audio in realtime will be another thing.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/30/2012 07:44 PM
Libe webcast on the air (not by NASA):
http://www.exploratorium.edu/mars/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: LegendCJS on 08/30/2012 08:05 PM
I think it was a "camouflaged" test for audio back-transmission , for future manned missions to Mars.
Sending data is one thing, sending images in another thing, sending audio recording is another thing, sending back audio in realtime will be another thing.


Sending digital data is the only thing. Real-time is meaningless at these distances. If you mean no hardware delay at origin or in relay satellite, this is already proven, as is digital data transmission with no hardware delays.

Also why do you think NASA needs to be covert in testing out technologies for future maned missions?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 08/30/2012 08:24 PM
Then they were just playing with a 2,5 billions dollars MP3 player.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Garrett on 08/30/2012 08:38 PM
I think it was a "camouflaged" test for audio back-transmission , for future manned missions to Mars.
Sending data is one thing, sending images in another thing, sending audio recording is another thing, sending back audio in realtime will be another thing.

Real-time is meaningless at these distances.
Real-time is not meaningless. Sure, the signal takes 14 or so minutes to get from Mars to Earth, but that doesn't mean it's not real time. Otherwise the notion of real-time wouldn't make sense under any scenario as there is always a signal transmission time. There's no such thing as zero transmission time (with the possible exception of quantum entanglement experiments).

Quote
Also why do you think NASA needs to be covert in testing out technologies for future maned missions?
The quotation marks he put around the word "camouflaged" suggests that he doesn't think NASA wanted to be covert. I think he was suggesting that they made use of an actual engineering test to perform some PR.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 08/31/2012 05:08 AM
Today Curiosity drove 70 feet (21 m) as per this link:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1330

Those color Mastcam 100 pics of the Mt. Sharp foothills stunned me when I saw them.  They remind me of the scenery on my favorite road - US 89 between Flagstaff and Panguitch, UT.  I look forward to what the rover will find in those rocks.  And I look forward to the vista the rover will see when she's on that mountain next year.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 09/04/2012 03:13 PM
I know it hasn't driven much yet, but has a traverse map been started?
I didn't find one on the JPL rover home page.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Kaputnik on 09/04/2012 07:29 PM
Not an official source, but worth a look:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=7442
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: savuporo on 09/06/2012 12:14 AM
I think it was a "camouflaged" test for audio back-transmission , for future manned missions to Mars.
Voice codecs are very different from audio codecs, that would be a pretty useless test.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/06/2012 12:39 AM
PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT) on Thursday, Sept. 6, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1335
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: cneth on 09/06/2012 01:37 AM
I think it was a "camouflaged" test for audio back-transmission , for future manned missions to Mars.
Voice codecs are very different from audio codecs, that would be a pretty useless test.
More to the point, audio is all digital these days.  There is no need to test that we can send data back from Mars.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:00 PM
Going live on NASA USTREAM right now:
http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:01 PM
Question time should start 17:30 UT, I'll try to ask explanation about "music test". :-)

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:01 PM
BTW, currently onair music is very irritating!!!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:03 PM
Which address did she say???
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:05 PM
Getting far from touchdown point.
"Playing" with chemcam.
Checking arm functionalities.
Completing rover checkout and calibration.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:06 PM
"Amazing pictures" in an AUDIOconference??? >:-(
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:07 PM
Ah ok, no people visibile, just MRO picture of landing site, with rover away from touchdown locatoin.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:07 PM
New color picture of parachute.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:08 PM
Quite an hard hit for a "parachuted" landing!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:09 PM
Note: subscribe to ustream community on http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl to ask NASA live your questions by chat!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:11 PM
Describing robotic arm, which has 5 motors / degrees of freedom.
Its instruments:
Drill, Spectrometer (APXS), CHIMRA (sample collector), MAHLI (camera), DRT (dust removal tool)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:13 PM
ground samples will be placed on a "playground" before getting inside the rover to be analyzed.

Showing slide with two arm positions, "Ready out", and "Drop sample".

Showing also animation of that, with MAHLI field of view highlighted.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:14 PM
Animatoin shows rover moving in a 3d environment textured with real surface pictures taken by MSL.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:16 PM
Successfully checkout of all scientific instruments.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:17 PM
Carachterizatoin Activity Phase - CAP is gonig to be soon completed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:17 PM
Shown calibration target picture shot on earth.
Ther'salso a coin on it! [Is it also on Mars?!?]
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:18 PM
Going to use this target to perform calibration on Mars.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 09/06/2012 05:18 PM
Images from the briefing can be seen at

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:19 PM
Remaining checkoout:
chemcam
day/night laser shot
navcam pointing

Showing route map.
We are nowon sol 29, going South-east. [I suppsed we were going north-east, toward Sharp!]
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:21 PM
Showing color image of robotic arm with mars in background. Viewing the lens-cap still in position.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:21 PM
MAHLI images till now were shot through glass lens cap.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:22 PM
Aileen Yingst, a scientist on the MAHLI, excited for being able to see by her eyes "her" instrument! :-)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:23 PM
Expecting much better MAHLI images once cap is removed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:23 PM
Question time, chat opening!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 05:33 PM
HELP ME! Nasa does not know anything about the "music test"! Have you got links?

They also  don't know about the small rock damagin a wheel with a hole, any link for this?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 06:18 PM
Full NASA chat transcript available on my blog:
http://jumpjack.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/mslmars-science-laboratorycuriosity-press-teleconference-full-chat-transcript-2012-09-06z1700/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 09/06/2012 07:41 PM
Meeting Recorded on USTREAM now available here:

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/25224209
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/06/2012 09:50 PM
I eventually found the picture I was asking info about iin the chat:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/q593/meraero/MSLLanding/Screenshot2012-09-05at121651PM.png

But, according to UMSF forum where I found it, that happened to the "spare" rover here on Earth:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=7426&view=findpost&p=190641
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jabe on 09/07/2012 08:10 PM
They also  don't know about the small rock damagin a wheel with a hole, any link for this?

i think this tweet (https://twitter.com/elakdawalla/status/243769044350693376) answers that .
jb
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/08/2012 01:33 AM
News release: 2012-280                                                                    Sept. 7, 2012

NASA Mars Exploration Rover Team to be Honored


Really belongs here:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=4075.0

I will re-post it there
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/09/2012 12:38 AM
Arm Work to Include Vibration Testing

09.07.2012

Curiosity skipped arm testing on Sol 31 (Sept. 6) after controllers held back on new commanding due to a caution about a temperature reading on the arm. The issue was resolved later in the day, so the planned activities have shifted to Sol 32 (Sept. 7). These include a checkout of the tool turret at the end of the arm and a test using vibration of the sample processing device on the arm.
The downlink during Sol 31 returned a Navigation Camera image of the turret taken during testing on Sol 30. It can be seen among the raw images from the rover at: http://1.usa.gov/NPGnIp .

Curiosity continues to work in good health. Sol 31, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, ended at 3:56 a.m. Sept. 7, PDT.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1337
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: racshot65 on 09/10/2012 02:55 PM
Calibration Target for Curiosity's Arm Camera

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA16132
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: racshot65 on 09/10/2012 02:55 PM
Belly Check for Curiosity

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA16133
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 09/10/2012 03:16 PM
While I appreciate will.i.am's space advocacy, his music is awful, this song included.  Never been a black eyed peas fan.  I wish NASA would have picked a better song, and I'm glad there are no Martians to listen to the broadcast, or they'd be very mad at us.   ;)

Not picking on you and you alone, TigerAde.

That was a fine song, and a fine message.  Which doesn't mean that every song that the Peas do is great.  It was a fine use of bandwidth also.  Just sayin'.

There's no science whatsoever behind liking or disliking music.  Where is the love?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/12/2012 02:10 AM
JPL to Stream Mars Curiosity Telecon and Lecture

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) tomorrow (Wednesday, Sept. 12), to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is more than one month into a two-year mission to investigate whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life.

Audio and visuals from the telecon will be streamed live to one of JPL's Ustream.tv channels, at http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals only will be available at the start of the telecon at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .
Also this week, Mars Science Laboratory Project Manager Richard Cook will speak Thursday, Sept. 13 in JPL's von Karman Auditorium. The lecture, which begins at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT), is open to the public and will be broadcast live with moderated chat, on JPL's Ustream channel.

For additional options to view live streaming video of Thursday's talk please visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.cfm?year=2012&month=9#NASA . For more information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/13/2012 01:19 AM
09.12.2012
Mars Rover Curiosity Finishing Arm Tests

The team operating NASA's Mars rover Curiosity is planning to resume driving the rover this week after it finishes a week of tests of the rover's arm. As Curiosity drives, it will use its cameras to find a rock to touch and examine with tools on the arm.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1345
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/13/2012 07:52 PM
09.13.2012
Sample-Handling Gear Gets a Buzz

Sol 37 (Sept. 12, 2012) was Curiosity's last day of characterization activities for its robotic arm. The sol's activities included a vibration test for the device on the arm that processes samples of soil, or powdered rock, collected by the scoop or drill. This device, the Collection and Handling for In-situ Martian Rock Analysis, or CHIMRA, has chambers and labyrinths for sorting, sieving and portioning the samples before the arm delivers them to analytical instruments.
The Sol 37 characterization activities also included imaging of the rover's observation tray by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (raw image at http://1.usa.gov/SeDdsY).

In addition, Curiosity's science instruments performed observations and measurements, including Mast Camera observations of the Martian moon Phobos passing in front of the sun.

Curiosity continues to work in good health. Sol 37, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, ended at 7:54 a.m. Sept. 13, PDT.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1346
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Ford Mustang on 09/14/2012 01:11 AM
Not sure where this should go... Someone posted this to Reddit..but, they took a month to make Curiosity's landing video from 4fps to an interpolated, smooth motion, 30fps landing video on YouTube, and in 1080p to boot!  Well worth the watch.  I don't believe this person is associated with NASA/JPL, either.

PLEASE NOTE: Video comments are NOT SAFE FOR WORK/CHILDREN.  Please read at user discretion.  To avoid that issue, please watch the embedded video below.  Thanks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Esj5juUzhpU
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/14/2012 01:38 AM
Not sure where this should go... Someone posted this to Reddit..but, they took a month to make Curiosity's landing video from 4fps to an interpolated, smooth motion, 30fps landing video on YouTube, and in 1080p to boot!  Well worth the watch.  I don't believe this person is associated with NASA/JPL, either.

Wow, the success of that landing never ceases to amaze. Did a great job on that video.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 09/14/2012 02:08 AM
Not sure where this should go... Someone posted this to Reddit..but, they took a month to make Curiosity's landing video from 4fps to an interpolated, smooth motion, 30fps landing video on YouTube, and in 1080p to boot!  Well worth the watch.  I don't believe this person is associated with NASA/JPL, either.

Wow, the success of that landing never ceases to amaze. Did a great job on that video.

The file maker, Bard Canning, also published a comparison of the original Mardi stills and his HD version.  along with a, you guess it,  a "Making Of" Video.

Comparison - Mars Curiosity Descent - Ultra HD 30fps Smooth-Motion
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjeHZ9poew4

Making of the motion-flow interpolated Mars Curiosity descent video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpjkaxeMGak

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/15/2012 11:43 AM
Backgorund sound is fake and wrongly sync'd.
Video is really cool.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/15/2012 10:54 PM
09.14.2012

32 Meters of Open Martian Road

Sol 38 (Sept. 13, 2012) was destined to be a driving day for NASA's latest edition to the Martian landscape. Curiosity perambulated over 105 feet (32 meters) of unpaved Gale Crater during yesterday's drive. The rover's odometer now clocks in at 466 feet (142 meters) covered since the landing on Aug. 5.

The sol's activities also included pre- and post-drive imaging of the road ahead by both Mastcam and Hazcam, and science measurements from the DAN and REMS instruments.

The Sol 38 Navcam image of the surface in front of the rover can be found at: (raw image at: http://1.usa.gov/QLCB15 ).

In addition, Curiosity's science instruments performed observations and measurements, including Mastcam observations of the Martian moon Phobos passing in front of the sun.

Curiosity continues to work in good health. Sol 38, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, ended at 8:34 a.m. on Sept. 14, PDT.


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1348
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/18/2012 12:12 AM
09.17.2012

More Meters in Curiosity's Rearview Mirror

Sol 39 through 41 (Sept. 14 - 17) were driving days for the Curiosity rover. On Sol 39, Curiosity logged 72 feet (22 meters) driven. On Sol 40, the rover drove another 121 feet (37 meters). On Sol 41, Curiosity logged 89 feet (27 meters), across the surface of Gale Crater. During this sol, for the first time, the DAN instrument (the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons investigation) was incorporated into the rover's drive sequence. In its active mode, DAN can detect minerals associated with water below the surface. Along Curiosity's path, DAN shoots neutrons into the ground and measures how they scatter. The instrument has a high sensitivity for finding any hydrogen to a depth of about 20 inches (50 centimeters) directly beneath the rover. After driving 33 feet (10 meters), the rover stops and the DAN instrument operates for two minutes. Then another 10 meters, then another DAN measurement.
Total distance racked up by Curiosity since landing on Mars on Aug. 5 is 745 feet (227 meters).

An image of the surface of Gale Crater, taken on Sol 41 by the rover's left navigation camera, is available at: http://1.usa.gov/OAG8Rv .

Curiosity continues to be in good health. Sol 41, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, ended at 10:33 a.m. Sept. 17, PDT.


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1349
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 09/18/2012 03:10 PM
Posting this as I love the comment section, where one fool is dealt with by everyone else:

http://news.sky.com/story/986499/mars-solar-eclipse-photographed-by-curiosity
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 09/18/2012 07:21 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY: M12-185

NASA HOSTS SEPT. 19 TELECONFERENCE ABOUT MARS CURIOSITY ROVER PROGRESS

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m.
PDT (2 p.m. EDT) on Wednesday, Sept. 19, to provide a status update
on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory, is 43 days into a two-year
mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for
microbial life.

For teleconference dial-in information, reporters must send their
name, media affiliation and telephone number to Elena Mejia at
elena.mejia@jpl.nasa.gov or call NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Media Relations Office at 818-354-5011.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

and

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at:

http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/mars

and

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 09/18/2012 09:34 PM
Posting this as I love the comment section, where one fool is dealt with by everyone else:

http://news.sky.com/story/986499/mars-solar-eclipse-photographed-by-curiosity

Sadly you seem to get at least one person like this on every space story these days. >:(
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 09/19/2012 12:01 AM
09.18.2012

Driving and Moon-Watching

On Sol 42 (Sept. 17, 2012), Curiosity drove about 105 feet (32 meters), toward the east-southeast, bringing the mission's total driving distance to about 850 feet (259 meters). The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument was used at two stops during the drive to check for hydrogen in the soil beneath the rover.
During this sol, the rover used its Mast Camera to observe Mars' two moons, Phobos and Deimos, as each passed in front of the sun.

Curiosity continues to work in good health. Sol 42, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, ends at 11:12 a.m. Sept. 18, PDT.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1350
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 05:53 PM
Going live!
http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 05:57 PM
Where did chatbox go?!?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 05:59 PM
Is anybody able to view/use the USTREAM NASAJPL chatbox today?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:04 PM
Eclipse animation available:
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/689557main_pia16151-516.gif)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:05 PM
next laser target:
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/689466main_pia16155-43_516-387.jpg)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:07 PM
I think the rock is named after just-passed NASA guy:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._Grotzinger
Professor of Geology at California Institute of Technology under the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:08 PM
Interesting target:
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/689413main_Grozinger-3-pia16150-REPLACED-43_516-387.jpg)
This area appears to keep a lot of hot both during day and night, and it must be investigated.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:10 PM
Describing Phobos and Deimos movement around Mars.
Describing eclipse.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:11 PM
Phobos moves much faster than Deimos, and its eclipse lasted just a few seconds.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:12 PM
Mastcam has "movie-capability" (some frames per second), compared to a single frame every several seconds from other rovers.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:14 PM
Images of another eclipse, shot during sunrise coming next days.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:17 PM
Question time.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 09/19/2012 06:20 PM
Mastcam has "movie-capability" (some frames per second), compared to a single frame every several seconds from other rovers.

In addition to trying to catch a dust devil, are they planning on filming a sunrise or sunset film?  That would be nice to see.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/19/2012 06:25 PM
I think the already filmed the "sunrise eclipse" (or anyway they'll do it in next days).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 09/19/2012 08:29 PM
NASA Teleconference About Mars Curiosity Rover Progress - September 19
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7850
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ChrisC on 09/20/2012 01:12 AM
Thank you John44 for capturing this!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Stardust9906 on 09/20/2012 11:23 AM
Unfortunately I missed the teleconference so thanks from me as well
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: belegor on 09/20/2012 06:32 PM
I think the rock is named after just-passed NASA guy:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._Grotzinger
Professor of Geology at California Institute of Technology under the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences.

Umm, the rock is named after Jake Matijevic, who was the "surface operations systems chief engineer for the Mars Science Laboratory Project" according to NASA:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16155.html (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16155.html)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/20/2012 08:44 PM
Forgot mentioning the link to the images!
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/20/2012 08:46 PM

Umm, the rock is named after Jake Matijevic, who was the "surface operations systems chief engineer for the Mars Science Laboratory Project" according to NASA:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16155.html (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16155.html)
In the link I just posted, some pictures are named "Grotzinger"... but being my english so awful :-) maybe it's just the name of the guy who talked about the pictures... :-)
But I also heard about somebody "passed away just after landing", didn0t understand who...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 09/21/2012 04:42 AM
There was a diary about the rock on daily kos a couple days back, but it got the name wrong.
They're big fans of the mission though.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 09/22/2012 02:45 PM
The latest pictures at:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?s=46

show the arm on  rock 'Matijevic'.  I think that the APXS is on the rock.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 09/26/2012 06:24 PM
Advisory: 2012-302                                                                     Sept. 26, 2012

NASA to Televise Mars Curiosity Rover Science Update Sept. 27

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-302&cid=release_2012-302

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a news conference at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) Thursday, Sept. 27, to present science findings from the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater. The news conference from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., will be carried live on NASA Television, the agency's website and on Ustream.

Curiosity, also known as the Mars Science Laboratory, is 50 days into a two-year mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv .

To watch on Ustream, go to: http://ustream.tv/nasajpl .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 09/27/2012 05:45 AM
I wasn't expecting a science press conference this soon.  Did they find something super interesting with the "scours" made by the landing rockets, or did they find something on Jake Maticevic? 

Looking forward to the press conference at noon Mountain time.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:01 PM
Going live right now.
http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl

Chat available again... but paused till question time! :-(
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:03 PM
Interesting outcrop pictured.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:03 PM
outcrop formed in presence of water!
By sure!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:05 PM
Comparison to Utah outcrop.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:05 PM
...taken by mastcam months ago.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:10 PM
water-generated pebbles visibie under outcrop.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:11 PM
Gal calls them "water transported material"
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:13 PM
Video google-earth animation to explain water effects on land.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:14 PM
Similar GE video, on MArs, showing a "canyon"/ancient river, just close to curiosty landing site.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:15 PM
underwater video showing rocks transported by water flow.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:15 PM
Image of a dry river bed on Earth looks similar to MSL current position surroundings/outcrop
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:20 PM
Question time.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 09/27/2012 06:36 PM
Crazy stuff!

RELEASE: 12-338

NASA ROVER FINDS OLD STREAMBED ON MARTIAN SURFACE

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Curiosity rover mission has found evidence
a stream once ran vigorously across the area on Mars where the rover
is driving. There is earlier evidence for the presence of water on
Mars, but this evidence - images of rocks containing ancient
streambed gravels - is the first of its kind.

Scientists are studying the images of stones cemented into a layer of
conglomerate rock. The sizes and shapes of stones offer clues to the
speed and distance of a long-ago stream's flow.

"From the size of gravels it carried, we can interpret the water was
moving about 3 feet per second, with a depth somewhere between ankle
and hip deep," said Curiosity science co-investigator William
Dietrich of the University of California, Berkeley. "Plenty of papers
have been written about channels on Mars with many different
hypotheses about the flows in them. This is the first time we're
actually seeing water-transported gravel on Mars. This is a
transition from speculation about the size of streambed material to
direct observation of it."

The finding site lies between the north rim of Gale Crater and the
base of Mount Sharp, a mountain inside the crater. Earlier imaging of
the region from Mars orbit allows for additional interpretation of
the gravel-bearing conglomerate. The imagery shows an alluvial fan of
material washed down from the rim, streaked by many apparent
channels, sitting uphill of the new finds.

The rounded shape of some stones in the conglomerate indicates
long-distance transport from above the rim, where a channel named
Peace Vallis feeds into the alluvial fan. The abundance of channels
in the fan between the rim and conglomerate suggests flows continued
or repeated over a long time, not just once or for a few years.

The discovery comes from examining two outcrops, called "Hottah" and
"Link" with the telephoto capability of Curiosity's mast camera
during the first 40 days after landing. Those observations followed
up on earlier hints from another outcrop, which was exposed by
thruster exhaust as Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory Project's
rover, touched down.

"Hottah looks like someone jack-hammered up a slab of city sidewalk,
but it's really a tilted block of an ancient streambed," said Mars
Science Laboratory Project Scientist John Grotzinger of the
California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

The gravels in conglomerates at both outcrops range in size from a
grain of sand to a golf ball. Some are angular, but many are rounded.

"The shapes tell you they were transported and the sizes tell you they
couldn't be transported by wind. They were transported by water
flow," said Curiosity science co-investigator Rebecca Williams of the
Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Ariz.

The science team may use Curiosity to learn the elemental composition
of the material, which holds the conglomerate together, revealing
more characteristics of the wet environment that formed these
deposits. The stones in the conglomerate provide a sampling from
above the crater rim, so the team may also examine several of them to
learn about broader regional geology.

The slope of Mount Sharp in Gale Crater remains the rover's main
destination. Clay and sulfate minerals detected there from orbit can
be good preservers of carbon-based organic chemicals that are
potential ingredients for life.

"A long-flowing stream can be a habitable environment," said
Grotzinger. "It is not our top choice as an environment for
preservation of organics, though. We're still going to Mount Sharp,
but this is insurance that we have already found our first
potentially habitable environment."

During the two-year prime mission of the Mars Science Laboratory,
researchers will use Curiosity's 10 instruments to investigate
whether areas in Gale Crater have ever offered environmental
conditions favorable for microbial life.

For more about Curiosity, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 09/27/2012 06:37 PM
Here's a screenshot of the presser - which John 44 will be recording and Jack is summarizing.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 09/27/2012 06:53 PM
chatlog available: http://is.gd/chatlog1
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 09/27/2012 07:41 PM
NASA Science Update on the Curiosity Rover's Mission to Mars' Gale Crater
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7866
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: MP99 on 09/28/2012 07:49 AM
Archive also available on Ustream:-
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/25748116 (http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/25748116)

I thought the Journo's asked some excellent questions.

cheers, Martin
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 09/28/2012 09:25 AM
Yay for 100,000 reads of a post landing thread! Not too shabby for a site that traditionally covers launch to S/C Sep (or through to landing and not much further in this case).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/02/2012 10:44 PM
News release: 2012-307                                                                     Oct. 2, 2012

NASA Hosts Teleconference About Mars Curiosity Rover Progress

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-307&cid=release_2012-307

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) on Thursday, Oct. 4, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

Curiosity, also known as the Mars Science Laboratory, is 56 days into a two-year mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/03/2012 10:45 PM
News release: 2012-310                                                                     Oct. 3, 2012

NASA's Curiosity Rover Checks In on Mars Using Foursquare

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-310&cid=release_2012-310

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Curiosity Mars rover checked in on Mars Wednesday using the mobile application Foursquare. This marks the first check-in on another planet. Users on Foursquare can keep up with Curiosity as the rover checks in at key locations and posts photos and tips, all while exploring the Red Planet.

"NASA is using Foursquare as a tool to share the rover's new locations while exploring Mars," said David Weaver, associate administrator for communications at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "This will help to involve the public with the mission and give them a sense of the rover's travels through Gale Crater."

After landing in Gale Crater last month, Curiosity began a planned 23-month mission that includes some of Mars' most intriguing scientific destinations. Curiosity is roving toward Mount Sharp, a mountain about 3 miles (5 kilometers) tall. The rover is conducting experiments along the way, seeking clues in the rocks and soil that would indicate whether Mars ever was capable of supporting microbial life. It is taking and sharing pictures of the trip.

Back here on Earth, Foursquare users will be able to earn a Curiosity-themed badge on the social media platform for check-ins at locations that generate an interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Available late this year, this new badge will encourage Foursquare users to explore science centers, laboratories and museums that pique scientific curiosity.

NASA has been on Foursquare since 2010 through a strategic partnership with the platform. This partnership, launched with astronaut Doug Wheelock's first-ever check-in from the International Space Station, has allowed users to connect with NASA and enabled them to explore the universe and re-discover Earth.

The partnership launched the NASA Explorer badge for Foursquare users, encouraging them to explore NASA-related locations across the country. It also included the launch of a NASA Foursquare page, where the agency provides official tips and information about the nation's space program.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Mars Science Laboratory mission and its Curiosity rover for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The rover was designed, developed and assembled at JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

To find out more about Mars Curiosity and NASA on Foursquare, visit: http://www.foursquare.com/MarsCuriosity and http://www.foursquare.com/NASA

For information about NASA's partnership with Foursquare, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/connect/foursquare.html

For more information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

Courtney O'Connor 818-354-2274
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
courtney.oconnor@jpl.nasa.gov

John Yembrick / Jason Townsend 202-358-1584 / 202-358-0359
NASA Headquarters, Washington
john.yembrick@nasa.gov / jason.c.townsend@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/04/2012 05:56 PM
Going live.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/04/2012 06:14 PM
Video demonstration of scoop&analyse system. It will be soon used.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/04/2012 06:15 PM
Slides and videos:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/telecon/index.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/04/2012 06:23 PM
(http://img843.imageshack.us/img843/5729/marsboot.jpg)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/05/2012 12:14 AM
JumpJack,

Neat!!   I thought the same when I first saw that Curiosity shot.  Thanks for getting the comparison photo of Neil's first step.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/05/2012 12:15 AM
News release: 2012-312                                                                     Oct. 4, 2012

NASA Mars Curiosity Rover Prepares to Study Martian Soil

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-312&cid=release_2012-312

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Curiosity rover is in a position on Mars where scientists and engineers can begin preparing the rover to take its first scoop of soil for analysis.

Curiosity is the centerpiece of the two-year Mars Science Laboratory mission. The rover's ability to put soil samples into analytical instruments is central to assessing whether its present location on Mars, called Gale Crater, ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. Mineral analysis can reveal past environmental conditions. Chemical analysis can check for ingredients necessary for life.

"We now have reached an important phase that will get the first solid samples into the analytical instruments in about two weeks," said Mission Manager Michael Watkins of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "Curiosity has been so well-behaved that we have made great progress during the first two months of the mission."

The rover's preparatory operations will involve testing its robotic scooping capabilities to collect and process soil samples. Later, it also will use a hammering drill to collect powdered samples from rocks. To begin preparations for a first scoop, the rover used one of its wheels Wednesday to scuff the soil to expose fresh material.

Next, the rover twice will scoop up some soil, shake it thoroughly inside the sample-processing chambers to scrub the internal surfaces, then discard the sample. Curiosity will scoop and shake a third measure of soil and place it in an observation tray for inspection by cameras mounted on the rover's mast. A portion of the third sample will be delivered to the mineral-identifying chemistry and mineralogy (CheMin) instrument inside the rover. From a fourth scoopful, samples will be delivered to both CheMin and to the sample analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, which identifies chemical ingredients.

"We're going to take a close look at the particle size distribution in the soil here to be sure it's what we want," said Daniel Limonadi of JPL, lead systems engineer for Curiosity's surface sampling and science system. "We are being very careful with this first time using the scoop on Mars."

The rinse-and-discard cycles serve a quality-assurance purpose similar to a common practice in geochemical laboratory analysis on Earth.

"It is standard to run a split of your sample through first and dump it out, to clean out any residue from a previous sample," said JPL's Joel Hurowitz, a sampling system scientist on the Curiosity team. "We want to be sure the first sample we analyze is unambiguously Martian, so we take these steps to remove any residual material from Earth that might be on the walls of our sample handling system."

Rocknest is the name of the area of soil Curiosity will test and analyze. The rover pulled up to the windblown, sandy and dusty location Oct. 2. The Rocknest patch is about 8 feet by 16 feet (2.5 meters by 5 meters). The area provides plenty of area for scooping several times. Diverse rocks nearby provide targets for investigation with the instruments on Curiosity's mast during the weeks the rover is stationed at Rocknest for this first scooping campaign.

Curiosity's motorized, clamshell-shaped scoop is 1.8 inches (4.5 centimeters) wide, 2.8 inches (7 centimeters) long, and can sample to a depth of about 1.4 inches (3.5 centimeters). It is part of the collection and handling Martian rock analysis (CHIMRA) device on a turret of tools at the end of the rover's arm. CHIMRA also includes a series of chambers and labyrinths for sorting, sieving and portioning samples collected by the scoop or by the arm's percussive drill.

Following the work at Rocknest, the rover team plans to drive Curiosity about 100 yards (about 100 meters) eastward into the Glenelg area and select a rock as the first target for use of its drill.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project and built Curiosity.

For more about Curiosity, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl or http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster / D.C. Agle 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/05/2012 01:08 AM
Curiosity Report (Oct. 4, 2012): Rover Gets Set to Scoop

Published on Oct 4, 2012 by JPLnews

NASA scientists and engineers prepare Mars Curiosity rover for its first scoop of soil for analysis.The rover's ability to put soil samples into analytical instruments is central to assessing whether its present location on Mars, called Gale Crater, ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5b6KSTst-o

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/08/2012 07:06 PM
now for the actual thing....

Curiosity's First Scoopful of Mars

Published on Oct 8, 2012 by JPLnews

This video clip shows the first Martian material collected by the scoop on the robotic arm of NASA's Mars Curiosity rover, being vibrated inside the scoop after it was lifted from the ground on Oct. 7, 2012.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V10goCmY2FQ
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 10/09/2012 01:05 AM
View of Curiosity's First Scoop Also Shows Bright Object

This image from the right Mast Camera (Mastcam) of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows a scoop full of sand and dust lifted by the rover's first use of the scoop on its robotic arm. In the foreground, near the bottom of the image, a bright object is visible on the ground. The object might be a piece of rover hardware.

This image was taken during the mission's 61st Martian day, or sol (Oct. 7, 2012), the same sol as the first scooping. After examining Sol 61 imaging, the rover team decided to refrain from using the arm on Sol 62 (Oct. 8). Instead, the rover was instructed to acquire additional imaging of the bright object, on Sol 62, to aid the team in assessing possible impact, if any, to sampling activities.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA16225

(...somebody's lost earring?)


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/09/2012 01:11 AM
now for the actual thing....

Curiosity's First Scoopful of Mars

Published on Oct 8, 2012 by JPLnews

This video clip shows the first Martian material collected by the scoop on the robotic arm of NASA's Mars Curiosity rover, being vibrated inside the scoop after it was lifted from the ground on Oct. 7, 2012.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V10goCmY2FQ

That was cool!

Almost looked to me like a bubbling cup of hot chocolate!  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 10/09/2012 09:20 AM
Maybe a Mars-Shrimp...
(http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00062/opgs/edr/ccam/CR0_403005421EDR_F0050104CCAM01062M_.JPG)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/09/2012 11:05 AM
Maybe a Mars-Shrimp...
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00062/opgs/edr/ccam/CR0_403005421EDR_F0050104CCAM01062M_.JPG

that is too curious!!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: apace on 10/09/2012 11:18 AM
Maybe a Mars-Shrimp...
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00062/opgs/edr/ccam/CR0_403005421EDR_F0050104CCAM01062M_.JPG

that is too curious!!

Will be more a part of Curiosity itself ;-)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/09/2012 11:28 AM
Maybe a Mars-Shrimp...
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00062/opgs/edr/ccam/CR0_403005421EDR_F0050104CCAM01062M_.JPG

that is too curious!!

Will be more a part of Curiosity itself ;-)

Was that a question? lol

No chance it is. Might be just another curious artifact, like many macro images so far from orbit.

edit: Looks like I'm eating crow. Apologies.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: apace on 10/09/2012 11:37 AM
Maybe a Mars-Shrimp...
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/proj/msl/redops/ods/surface/sol/00062/opgs/edr/ccam/CR0_403005421EDR_F0050104CCAM01062M_.JPG

that is too curious!!

Will be more a part of Curiosity itself ;-)

Was that a question? lol

No chance it is. Might be just another curious artifact, like many macro images so far from orbit.

Why not a part of Curiosity? Before this picture, the sample was shaked, perhhaps something was falling away from the rover.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 10/09/2012 12:33 PM
Of course it was not a question!  ;D

Seriously: Maybe some part of the arm flaked off? Cable insulation?
Looks like a plastic foil or something
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bogeyman on 10/09/2012 12:35 PM
Curiosity should fire the Chemcam at it and "sniff" what that thing is.
If it smells like plastic: Rover part.
If it smells like fish: Mars shrimp (as I said) ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chandonn on 10/09/2012 12:50 PM
Curiosity should fire the Chemcam at it ...


... and start an interplanetary war with the Martian Shrimp-people?????    :o
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/09/2012 05:58 PM
THIS could be a part of curiosity!
(http://img.gawkerassets.com/img/181mruo23mezwjpg/original.jpg)
http://gizmodo.com/5950185/what-is-this-shiny-metallic-thing-found-on-mars
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 10/09/2012 08:09 PM
This thread on UMSF is helpful:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=7495&st=120&start=120
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 10/09/2012 08:39 PM
Link from that UMSF site:

http://mepag.jpl.nasa.gov/meeting/oct-12/presentations/07_MEPAG-MSL-Oct2012F.pdf
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/09/2012 11:49 PM
Of course it was not a question!  ;D

Seriously: Maybe some part of the arm flaked off? Cable insulation?
Looks like a plastic foil or something

Yeah...I corrected my earlier post. As much as I love monochromatic (B&W) images, this is a case where colour has many advantages.

Apologies for my 'jumping to conclusions'
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Retired Downrange on 10/10/2012 07:14 PM
The team operating Curiosity decided on Oct. 9, 2012, to proceed with using the rover's first scoop of Martian material. Plans for Sol 64 (Oct. 10) call for shifting the scoopful of sand and dust into the mechanism for sieving and portioning samples, and vibrating it vigorously to clean internal surfaces of the mechanism. This first scooped sample, and the second one, will be discarded after use, since they are only being used for the cleaning process. Subsequent samples scooped from the same "Rocknest" area will be delivered to analytical instruments.

Investigation of a small, bright object thought to have come from the rover may resume between the first and second scoop. Over the past two sols, with rover arm activities on hold, the team has assessed the object as likely to be some type of plastic wrapper material, such as a tube used around a wire, possibly having fallen onto the rover from the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft's descent stage during the landing in August.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/m/news/index.cfm?release=2012-316
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John Duncan on 10/10/2012 08:27 PM
Perhaps they will scrutinize the images of the rover top surface for the fragment, pre-fall?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/11/2012 06:44 AM
Media Advisory: 2012-315                                                                     Oct. 9, 2012

NASA Hosts Teleconference About Mars Rover Progress

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-315&cid=release_2012-315

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) on Thursday, Oct. 11, to provide a status update on the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover is 63 days into a two-year mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/11/2012 06:06 PM
Placeholder for Ustream chatlog (if they open chatbox):
http://is.gd/chatlog4
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/11/2012 06:21 PM
boring spectrography
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 10/11/2012 06:22 PM
boring spectrography

lol...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: racshot65 on 10/11/2012 08:01 PM
Mars Rock Touched by NASA Curiosity has Surprises

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-318
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/13/2012 01:40 AM
10.12.2012
Curiosity Preparing for Second Scoop

On Sol 65 (Oct. 11, 2012) of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity completed several activities in preparation for collecting its second scoop of soil. Like the first scoop, the next will come from a ripple of sand and dust at "Rocknest," and will be used for cleaning interior surfaces of the sample-handling chambers on the arm.
The Collection and Handling for In-Situ Martian Rock Analysis (CHIMRA) tool on the end of arm shook out remnants of the first scoopful and posed for camera inspection to verify it was emptied. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) moved close some loose material on the ground to get a good look. Seeing more detail in the object will help engineers finish assessing whether this loose material from the spacecraft poses any concern for future operations. A raw image from that MAHLI activity is at http://1.usa.gov/Qgs5ha .

Sol 65, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, will end at 2:22 a.m. Oct. 12, PDT (5:22 a.m., EDT).

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1376
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/13/2012 03:01 AM
NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover Report #9

Published on Oct 12, 2012 by NASAtelevision

A NASA's Mars Curiosity rover team member gives an update on developments and status of the planetary exploration mission. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its target area on Mars at 1:31:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 6, which includes the 13.8 minutes needed for confirmation of the touchdown to be radioed to Earth at the speed of light.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Az7GQb-emnk
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/15/2012 10:15 PM
10.15.2012

Rover's Second Scoop Discarded, Third Scoop Commanded

Commands will be sent to Curiosity today instructing the rover to collect a third scoop of soil from the "Rocknest" site of windblown Martian sand and dust. Pending evaluation of this Sol 69 (Oct. 15, 2012) scooping, a sample from the scoopful is planned as the first sample for delivery -- later this week -- to one of the rover's internal analytical instruments, the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument. A later scoopful will become the first solid sample for delivery to the rover's other internal analytical instrument, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument.

The rover's second scoopful, collected on Sol 66 (Oct. 12), was intentionally discarded on Sol 67 due to concern about particles of bright material seen in the hole dug by the scooping. Other small pieces of bright material in the Rocknest area have been assessed as debris from the spacecraft. The science team did not want to put spacecraft material into the rover's sample-processing mechanisms. Confidence for going ahead with the third scooping was based on new assessment that other bright particles in the area are native Martian material. One factor in that consideration is seeing some bright particles embedded in clods of Martian soil. Further investigations of the bright particles are planned, including some imaging in the Sol 69 plan.

Sol 69, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, will end at 5:01 a.m. Oct. 16, PDT (8:01 a.m., EDT).

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1377
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 10/16/2012 12:57 AM
Mars Rock Touched by NASA Curiosity has Surprises

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-318

It is easy to miss the mention that this was already the 30th rock analyzed by ChemCam.

Not only that, but each rock analyzed typically is examined in multiple spots. This rock was examined in 14 locations, and most importantly, ChemCam reported differing compositions at each location it shot, so aside from its ability to give researchers very quick, hands-off analyses of large numbers of targets, it is also doing a solid job of demonstrating its ability to resolve small scale chemical variations in its targets.

Maybe JPL should add another counter on their website next to the mission clock: number of shots fired by ChemCam, and number of enemy targets destroyed...err...I mean...number of science targets analyzed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/16/2012 11:54 PM
News release: 2012-327                                                                     Oct. 16, 2012

NASA to Host Mars Curiosity Rover Teleconference Oct. 18

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-327&cid=release_2012-327

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at noon PDT (3 p.m. EDT) on Thursday, Oct. 18, about the latest status of the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars.

The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover is 10 weeks into a two-year mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 10/17/2012 04:19 AM
From http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/news/category/astrogeology/item/sol-69-update-on-curiosity-from-usgs-scientist-ken-herkenhoff-pushing-data 

MRO went into safe mode, meaning much less bandwidth is available for MSL.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 10/18/2012 06:17 AM
I saw a tweet from the HIRISE team that indicated MRO was now out of safe mode.  Good news.

Looking forward to the teleconference in 12 hours, hoping for some great new pics and data as usual.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/18/2012 10:53 PM
10.18.2012
Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Mars Soil Sample Delivered for Analysis Inside Rover


PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has ingested its first solid sample into an analytical instrument inside the rover, a capability at the core of the two-year mission.
The rover's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument is analyzing this sample to determine what minerals it contains.

"We are crossing a significant threshold for this mission by using CheMin on its first sample," said Curiosity's project scientist, John Grotzinger of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "This instrument gives us a more definitive mineral-identifying method than ever before used on Mars: X-ray diffraction. Confidently identifying minerals is important because minerals record the environmental conditions under which they form."

The sample is a sieved portion -- about as much material as in a baby aspirin -- from the third scoop collected by Curiosity as a windblown patch of dusty sand called "Rocknest." The rover's robotic arm delivered the sample to CheMin's opened inlet funnel on the rover's deck on Oct. 17.

The previous day, the rover shook the scooped material inside sample-processing chambers to scrub internal surfaces of any residue carried from Earth. One earlier scoopful was also used for cleaning. Additional repetitions of this cleaning method will be used before delivery of a future sample to the rover's other internal analytic instrument, the Sample Analysis at Mars investigation, which studies samples' chemistry.

Various small bits of light-toned material on the ground at Rocknest have affected the rover's activities in the past several days. One piece about half an inch (1.3 centimeters) long was noticed on Oct. 7. The rover team postponed use of the robotic arm for two days while investigating this object, and assessed it to be debris from the spacecraft.

Images taken after Curiosity collected its second scoop of Rocknest material on Oct. 12 showed smaller bits of light-toned material in the hole dug by the scooping action. This led to discarding that scoopful rather than using it to scrub the processing mechanisms. Scientists assess these smaller, bright particles to be native Martian material, not from the spacecraft.
"We plan to learn more both about the spacecraft material and about the smaller, bright particles," said Curiosity Project Manager Richard Cook of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena. "We will finish determining whether the spacecraft material warrants concern during future operations. The native Mars particles become fodder for the mission's scientific studies."

During a two-year prime mission, researchers are using Curiosity's 10 instruments to assess whether the study area has ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. JPL, a division of Caltech, manages the project and built Curiosity. For more about Curiosity, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/19/2012 07:51 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (Oct. 19, 2012) Mars Soil Sample Delivered

Published on Oct 19, 2012 by JPLnews
NASA's Curiosity rover delivers its first soil sample to its chemistry and mineralogy instrument.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neUJ5y4hrkE
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 10/21/2012 08:15 AM
Does it exist an official, public method to know in which direction Mastcam is pointed in each picture?
Hence, how can we find same feature in different shots to build 3d anagliphs or study objects from different angles?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 10/22/2012 11:16 PM
10.22.2012
Curiosity Rover Collects Fourth Scoop of Martian Soil

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shook a scoopful of dusty sand inside its sample-handling mechanism on Sol 75 (Oct. 21, 2012) as the third scrubbing of interior surfaces of the mechanism. The rover team is instructing the rover to deliver a sieved sample from this scoopful -- the mission's fourth -- onto Curiosity's observation tray on Oct. 22 and plans to analyze another sample from the same scoopful with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument this week.
Curiosity collected this fourth scoop of soil on Sol 74 (Oct. 20). A later scoop will become the first delivered to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument. While continuing with scooping activities at the "Rocknest" site, the rover also has been examining surroundings with the Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) and Mast Camera (Mastcam) instruments, and monitoring environmental conditions with the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) and Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instruments of its science payload.

Sol 75, in Mars local mean solar time at Gale Crater, ended at 8:58 a.m. Oct. 22, PDT (11:58 a.m., EDT).

2012-332

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1380
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 10/23/2012 02:52 AM
So a second run with ChemMin and the first run with SAM?  Am I reading this right?  Did they find something intriguing?  Very exciting.  The press conference on Thursday should be rather interesting.
They mentioned several times that they would be flushing the system out with several scoops to rid it of Earth-grote.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 10/26/2012 12:09 AM
So a second run with ChemMin and the first run with SAM?  Am I reading this right?  Did they find something intriguing?  Very exciting.  The press conference on Thursday should be rather interesting.
They mentioned several times that they would be flushing the system out with several scoops to rid it of Earth-grote.

I knew about the flushing of CHIMRA but I was interested in the ChemMin samples.   Apparenty I was reading it right; there was a second ChemMin run (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-336), and it does not appear to be for flushing purposes.  Grotzinger did not mention a planned second ChemMin run during the last press teleconference; seems as if they wanted a second look.  Maybe they were hoping to get one of the reflective particles in the second run (a tiny piece of it anyway).

Very interesting.  I like to think they found something intriguing. 

I cannot wait to see the results....but I have heard some dire warnings that results will not be forthcoming until December  :(
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/26/2012 08:39 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (Oct. 26, 2012):
Working with Curiosity's ChemCam Laser


Published on Oct 26, 2012 by JPLnews
Curiosity uses its ChemCam laser to explore a tiny cluster of rocks nicknamed "Stonehenge."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDgv14Qtl1c
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: BrightLight on 10/26/2012 10:44 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (Oct. 26, 2012):
Working with Curiosity's ChemCam Laser


Published on Oct 26, 2012 by JPLnews
Curiosity uses its ChemCam laser to explore a tiny cluster of rocks nicknamed "Stonehenge."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDgv14Qtl1c
Tunneling through the surface patina of selected rocks is a critical requirement for understanding the history and evolution of the mars geology, this is where chemcam really shows its utility.

and
Nina  rocks! ;D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/27/2012 02:12 AM
News advisory: 2012-338                                                                       Oct. 26, 2012

NASA Oct. 30 Telecon About Mars Curiosity Progress

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-338&cid=release_2012-338

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11:30 a.m. PDT (2:30 p.m. EDT) on Tuesday, Oct. 30, to provide an update about the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory Project and its Curiosity rover are almost three months into a two-year prime mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 10/28/2012 01:14 AM
News advisory: 2012-338                                                                       Oct. 26, 2012

NASA Oct. 30 Telecon About Mars Curiosity Progress

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-338&cid=release_2012-338

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11:30 a.m. PDT (2:30 p.m. EDT) on Tuesday, Oct. 30, to provide an update about the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory Project and its Curiosity rover are almost three months into a two-year prime mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov
- end -

Will this be the where they finally unveil the TLS methane measurements?  I sort of doubt it; I suspect that they would have a press conference instead of a tele conference for something this important.

How about the ChemMin results?  Or more ChemCam results?

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/30/2012 07:41 PM
News release: 2012-341                                                                    Oct. 30, 2012

NASA Rover's First Soil Studies Help Fingerprint Martian Minerals

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-341&cid=release_2012-341

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has completed initial experiments showing the mineralogy of Martian soil is similar to weathered basaltic soils of volcanic origin in Hawaii.

The minerals were identified in the first sample of Martian soil ingested recently by the rover. Curiosity used its Chemistry and Mineralogy instrument (CheMin) to obtain the results, which are filling gaps and adding confidence to earlier estimates of the mineralogical makeup of the dust and fine soil widespread on the Red Planet.

"We had many previous inferences and discussions about the mineralogy of Martian soil," said David Blake of NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., who is the principal investigator for CheMin. "Our quantitative results provide refined and in some cases new identifications of the minerals in this first X-ray diffraction analysis on Mars."

The identification of minerals in rocks and soil is crucial for the mission's goal to assess past environmental conditions. Each mineral records the conditions under which it formed. The chemical composition of a rock provides only ambiguous mineralogical information, as in the textbook example of the minerals diamond and graphite, which have the same chemical composition, but strikingly different structures and properties.

CheMin uses X-ray diffraction, the standard practice for geologists on Earth using much larger laboratory instruments. This method provides more accurate identifications of minerals than any method previously used on Mars. X-ray diffraction reads minerals' internal structure by recording how their crystals distinctively interact with X-rays. Innovations from Ames led to an X-ray diffraction instrument compact enough to fit inside the rover.

These NASA technological advances have resulted in other applications on Earth, including compact and portable X-ray diffraction equipment for oil and gas exploration, analysis of archaeological objects and screening of counterfeit pharmaceuticals, among other uses.

"Our team is elated with these first results from our instrument," said Blake. "They heighten our anticipation for future CheMin analyses in the months and miles ahead for Curiosity."

The specific sample for CheMin's first analysis was soil Curiosity scooped up at a patch of dust and sand that the team named Rocknest. The sample was processed through a sieve to exclude particles larger than 0.006 inch (150 micrometers), roughly the width of a human hair. The sample has at least two components: dust distributed globally in dust storms and fine sand originating more locally. Unlike conglomerate rocks Curiosity investigated a few weeks ago, which are several billion years old and indicative of flowing water, the soil material CheMin has analyzed is more representative of modern processes on Mars.

"Much of Mars is covered with dust, and we had an incomplete understanding of its mineralogy," said David Bish, CheMin co-investigator with Indiana University in Bloomington. "We now know it is mineralogically similar to basaltic material, with significant amounts of feldspar, pyroxene and olivine, which was not unexpected. Roughly half the soil is non-crystalline material, such as volcanic glass or products from weathering of the glass. "

Bish said, "So far, the materials Curiosity has analyzed are consistent with our initial ideas of the deposits in Gale Crater recording a transition through time from a wet to dry environment. The ancient rocks, such as the conglomerates, suggest flowing water, while the minerals in the younger soil are consistent with limited interaction with water."

During the two-year prime mission of the Mars Science Laboratory Project, researchers are using Curiosity's 10 instruments to investigate whether areas in Gale Crater ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, and built Curiosity and CheMin.

For more information about Curiosity and its mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

For more information about a commercial application of the CheMin technology, visit: http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/mars-rover-technology-helps-unlock-art-mysteries/ .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster / D.C. Agle 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Rachel Hoover 650-604-4789
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
rachel.hoover@nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 10/31/2012 10:07 PM
Media advisory: 2012-343                                                                    Oct. 31, 2012

NASA Hosts Nov. 2 Teleconference About Mars Rover Progress

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-343&cid=release_2012-343

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT) on Friday, Nov. 2, to provide an update on Curiosity's studies of the Martian atmosphere.

The Mars Science Laboratory Project and its Curiosity rover are about three months into a two-year prime mission to investigate whether conditions in Mars' Gale Crater may have been favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/01/2012 02:24 AM
Curiosity Rover Takes Best Self-Portrait Ever

Quote
Amateur astronomer and science writer Stuart Atkinson stitched together the raw images that Curiosity beamed back to Earth on Oct 31. 

Story:
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/10/curiosity-self-portrait-best/

Full Size picture:
http://twitpic.com/b95icx/full
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: TheFallen on 11/01/2012 02:28 AM
Curiosity Rover Takes Best Self-Portrait Ever

Quote
Amateur astronomer and science writer Stuart Atkinson stitched together the raw images that Curiosity beamed back to Earth on Oct 31. 


http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/10/curiosity-self-portrait-best/

Nice!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 11/01/2012 11:15 PM
Does it exist an official, public method to know in which direction Mastcam is pointed in each picture?
Hence, how can we find same feature in different shots to build 3d anagliphs or study objects from different angles?


I don't think so.

For the Mars Exploration Rovers, the filenames on the RAW images were a code that included quite a bit of data about the photo, and the MSL filenames appear to be equally complex, but not of the same format. However, for the MER's camera direction was not one of the included details.

I suppose if that information were to be found anywhere, it would be the Planetary Data System, but MSL data has not been released on PDS yet.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/03/2012 12:47 AM
News release 2012-348                                                                    Nov. 2, 2012

NASA Rover Finds Clues to Changes in Mars' Atmosphere

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-348&cid=release_2012-348

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's car-sized rover, Curiosity, has taken significant steps toward understanding how Mars may have lost much of its original atmosphere.

Learning what happened to the Martian atmosphere will help scientists assess whether the planet ever was habitable. The present atmosphere of Mars is 100 times thinner than Earth's.

A set of instruments aboard the rover has ingested and analyzed samples of the atmosphere collected near the "Rocknest" site in Gale Crater where the rover is stopped for research. Findings from the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments suggest that loss of a fraction of the atmosphere, resulting from a physical process favoring retention of heavier isotopes of certain elements, has been a significant factor in the evolution of the planet. Isotopes are variants of the same element with different atomic weights.

Initial SAM results show an increase of five percent in heavier isotopes of carbon in the atmospheric carbon dioxide compared to estimates of the isotopic ratios present when Mars formed. These enriched ratios of heavier isotopes to lighter ones suggest the top of the atmosphere may have been lost to interplanetary space. Losses at the top of the atmosphere would deplete lighter isotopes. Isotopes of argon also show enrichment of the heavy isotope, matching previous estimates of atmosphere composition derived from studies of Martian meteorites on Earth.

Scientists theorize that in Mars' distant past its environment may have been quite different, with persistent water and a thicker atmosphere. NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission will investigate possible losses from the upper atmosphere when it arrives at Mars in 2014.

With these initial sniffs of Martian atmosphere, SAM also made the most sensitive measurements ever to search for methane gas on Mars. Preliminary results reveal little to no methane. Methane is of interest as a simple precursor chemical for life. On Earth, it can be produced by either biological or non-biological processes.

Methane has been difficult to detect from Earth or the current generation of Mars orbiters because the gas exists on Mars only in traces, if at all. The Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) in SAM provides the first search conducted within the Martian atmosphere for this molecule. The initial SAM measurements place an upper limit of just a few parts methane per billion parts of Martian atmosphere, by volume, with enough uncertainty that the amount could be zero.

"Methane is clearly not an abundant gas at the Gale Crater site, if it is there at all. At this point in the mission we're just excited to be searching for it," said SAM TLS lead Chris Webster of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "While we determine upper limits on low values, atmospheric variability in the Martian atmosphere could yet hold surprises for us."

In Curiosity's first three months on Mars, SAM has analyzed atmosphere samples with two laboratory methods. One is a mass spectrometer investigating the full range of atmospheric gases. The other, TLS, has focused on carbon dioxide and methane. During its two-year prime mission, the rover also will use an instrument called a gas chromatograph that separates and identifies gases. The instrument also will analyze samples of soil and rock, as well as more atmosphere samples.

"With these first atmospheric measurements we already can see the power of having a complex chemical laboratory like SAM on the surface of Mars," said SAM Principal Investigator Paul Mahaffy of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Both atmospheric and solid sample analyses are crucial for understanding Mars' habitability."

SAM is set to analyze its first solid sample in the coming weeks, beginning the search for organic compounds in the rocks and soils of Gale Crater. Analyzing water-bearing minerals and searching for and analyzing carbonates are high priorities for upcoming SAM solid sample analyses.

Researchers are using Curiosity's 10 instruments to investigate whether areas in Gale Crater ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, and built Curiosity. The SAM instrument was developed at Goddard with instrument contributions from Goddard, JPL and the University of Paris in France.

For more information about Curiosity and its mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Nancy Neal Jones 301-286-0039
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
nancy.n.jones@nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 11/03/2012 01:00 AM
Interesting results, I really wish they had a better base line than
Quote
estimates of the isotopic ratios present when Mars formed

Anyone know if they will be be able to pull the carbon ratios out of some of the rocks?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/03/2012 01:08 AM
NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover Report #13 -- November 1, 2012

Published on Nov 2, 2012 by NASAtelevision

A NASA's Mars Curiosity rover team member gives an update on developments and status of the planetary exploration mission. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its target area on Mars at 1:31:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 6, which includes the 13.8 minutes needed for confirmation of the touchdown to be radioed to Earth at the speed of light. The rover will conduct a nearly two-year prime mission to investigate whether the Gale Crater region of Mars ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jy52AUjRHM
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 11/08/2012 01:16 AM
(I bet they're happy!!):

11.06.2012

Curiosity Team Switches Back to Earth Time

PASADENA, Calif. -- After three months working on "Mars time," the team operating NASA Mars rover Curiosity has switched to more regular hours, as planned.
A Martian day, called a sol, is about 40 minutes longer than an Earth day, so the team's start time for daily planning has been moving a few hours later each week. This often resulted in the team working overnight hours, Pacific Time.

Starting this week, most of the team's work will stay within bounds of 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., PST. Compressing the daily planning process for rover activities makes the switch possible.

"People are glad to be going off Mars time," said Richard Cook of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., project manager for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project, which operates Curiosity. "The team has been successful in getting the duration of the daily planning process from more than 16 hours, during the initial weeks after landing, down to 12 hours. We've been getting better at operations."

A simultaneous change this week begins more dispersed operations for the scientists on the rover team. The team includes about 200 JPL engineers and about 400 scientists, mostly from other institutions. More than 200 non-JPL scientists who have spent some time working at JPL since Curiosity's landing on Aug. 5, 2012 (Pacific Time; Aug. 6, Eastern Time and Universal Time) will continue participating regularly from their home institutions throughout North America and Europe. The team has been preparing in recent weeks to use dispersed participation teleconferences and Web connections.

"The phase that we're completing, working together at one location, has been incredibly valuable for team-building and getting to know each other under the pressure of daily timelines," said Mars Science Laboratory Deputy Project Scientist Joy Crisp, of JPL. "We have reached the point where we can continue working together well without needing to have people living away from their homes."

The operational planning this week is focused on getting a first sample of solid Martian material into the rover's Sample Analysis at Mars, or SAM, instrument.

On the mission's Sol 89 (Nov. 5, 2012), the other analytical instrument inside the rover, Chemistry and Mineralogy, or CheMin, dumped out the second soil sample it had finished analyzing. That second sample into CheMin came from the fourth scoop of soil that Curiosity's robotic arm collected at a site called "Rocknest." Also on Sol 89 came confirmation that SAM had completed an overnight analysis run on a blank sample cup in preparation for receiving a soil sample. Plans call for the fifth scoop at Rocknest to provide samples going into both SAM and CheMin in coming days.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the rover.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1389
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 11/08/2012 02:20 AM
Emily Lakdawalla did a long and informative google hangout with SAM deputy PI Pamela Conrad. A recording is available at http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/11071600-hangout-pan-conrad-sam.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/10/2012 04:03 AM
SAM Sniffs Mars' Atmosphere

Published on Nov 9, 2012 by JPLnews

The Curiosity rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments make the most sensitive measurements ever to search for methane gas on the Red Planet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6uWUrxuuok
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/13/2012 02:10 AM

Lakdawalla's interview with Pan (not Pamela) Conrad was excellent.  A bit more detailed than the JPL video.  She is very well spoken and the subject is fascinating.

One question I had was about their discussion the difficulty of life detection with the SAM suite.  I was thinking that the stereochemistry of any organics found would be the key.  As we all know, non-biological organics are usually racemic while biological organics are not. A detection L-amino acids would would be a clear sign of life. Or am I wrong? This is certainly true on Earth but maybe possible life on Mars would be different.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/14/2012 12:40 AM
Media advisory: 2012-357                                                                    Nov. 13, 2012

NASA Hosts Nov. 15 Telecon About Mars Rover Progress

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-357&cid=release_2012-357

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m. PST (2 p.m. EST) on Thursday, Nov. 15, to provide an update about the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory Project and its Curiosity rover are three months into a two-year prime mission to investigate whether conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

DC Agle / Guy Webster 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov / guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 11/14/2012 11:58 PM
IN case people missed this:

PBS documentary tonight on Curiosity!  :)

Ultimate Mars Challenge

In its search for life beyond Earth, NASA employs a "sky crane" maneuver to land the Curiosity rover on Mars. Airing November 14, 2012 at 9 pm on PBS

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/ultimate-mars-challenge.html

edit to add: that was quite enjoyable. Well worth seeing imo.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 11/15/2012 07:18 PM
RELEASE: 12-402

NASA ROVER PROVIDING NEW WEATHER AND RADIATION DATA ABOUT MARS

PASADENA, Calif. -- Observations of wind patterns and natural
radiation patterns on Mars by NASA's Curiosity rover are helping
scientists better understand the environment on the Red Planet's
surface.

Researchers using the car-sized mobile laboratory have identified
transient whirlwinds, mapped winds in relation to slopes, tracked
daily and seasonal changes in air pressure, and linked rhythmic
changes in radiation to daily atmospheric changes. The knowledge
being gained about these processes helps scientists interpret
evidence about environmental changes on Mars might have led to
conditions favorable for life.

During the first 12 weeks after Curiosity landed in an area named Gale
Crater, an international team of researchers analyzed data from more
than 20 atmospheric events with at least one characteristic of a
whirlwind recorded by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station
(REMS) instrument. Those characteristics can include a brief dip in
air pressure, a change in wind direction, a change in wind speed, a
rise in air temperature or a dip in ultraviolet light reaching the
rover. Two of the events included all five characteristics.

In many regions of Mars, dust-devil tracks and shadows have been seen
from orbit, but those visual clues have not been seen in Gale Crater.
One possibility is that vortex whirlwinds arise at Gale without
lifting as much dust as they do elsewhere.

"Dust in the atmosphere has a major role in shaping the climate on
Mars," said Manuel de la Torre Juarez of NASA's Jet Propulsion
Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. He is the investigation
scientist for REMS, which Spain provided for the mission. "The dust
lifted by dust devils and dust storms warms the atmosphere."

Dominant wind direction identified by REMS has surprised some
researchers who expected slope effects to produce north-south winds.
The rover is just north of a mountain called Mount Sharp. If air
movement up and down the mountain's slope governed wind direction,
dominant winds generally would be north-south. However, east-west
winds appear to predominate. The rim of Gale Crater may be a factor.

"With the crater rim slope to the north and Mount Sharp to the south,
we may be seeing more of the wind blowing along the depression in
between the two slopes, rather than up and down the slope of Mount
Sharp," said Claire Newman, a REMS investigator at Ashima Research in
Pasadena. "If we don't see a change in wind patterns as Curiosity
heads up the slope of Mount Sharp -- that would be a surprise."

REMS monitoring of air pressure has tracked both a seasonal increase
and a daily rhythm. Neither was unexpected, but the details improve
understanding of atmospheric cycles on present-day Mars, which helps
with estimating how the cycles may have operated in the past.

The seasonal increase results from tons of carbon dioxide, which had
been frozen into a southern winter ice cap, returning into the
atmosphere as southern spring turns to summer. The daily cycle of
higher pressure in the morning and lower pressure in the evening
results from daytime heating of the atmosphere by the sun. As morning
works its way westward around the planet, so does a wave of
heat-expanded atmosphere, known as a thermal tide.

Effects of that atmospheric tide show up in data from Curiosity's
Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD). This instrument monitors
high-energy radiation considered to be a health risk to astronauts
and a factor in whether microbes could survive on Mars' surface.

"We see a definite pattern related to the daily thermal tides of the
atmosphere," said RAD principal investigator Don Hassler of the
Southwest Research Institute's Boulder, Colo., branch. "The
atmosphere provides a level of shielding, and so charged-particle
radiation is less when the atmosphere is thicker. Overall, Mars'
atmosphere reduces the radiation dose compared to what we saw during
the flight to Mars."

The overall goal of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is to use
10 instruments on Curiosity to assess whether areas inside Gale
Crater ever offered a habitable environment for microbes.

JPL manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science
Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL also built Curiosity.

For more about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

and

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/16/2012 02:31 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (Nov. 15, 2012): Wind and Radiation on Mars

Published on Nov 15, 2012 by JPLnews
Curiosity monitors radiation and spots elusive whirlwinds on Mars.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0596IF-8s4
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/20/2012 01:21 PM
Accidentally posted this on the wrong thread. Possibly very big news from Mars: http://m.npr.org/news/front/165513016
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 11/20/2012 01:56 PM
Accidentally posted this on the wrong thread. Possibly very big news from Mars: http://m.npr.org/news/front/165513016


OOoooooo  goody.

I like those kind of surprises!  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 11/20/2012 02:07 PM
So did they finally found Saddam's missing WMD or is it something more interesting like complex organics?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Ares67 on 11/20/2012 03:12 PM
So did they finally found Saddam's missing WMD or is it something more interesting like complex organics?

Or maybe they've found Perry?  :D

http://d23.disney.go.com/news/2012/07/d23-first-look-wheres-perry/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lumpy on 11/20/2012 03:32 PM
So I herd this on NPR radio today. Seems they (MSL) found somthing in the mars soil that (quote)... "is gonna be one for the history books. It's looking really good,"  WTF ?  Anyone know more about this ?

http://www.npr.org/2012/11/20/165513016/big-news-from-mars-rover-scientists-mum-for-now
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: butters on 11/20/2012 04:16 PM
I have a source at the American Museum of Natural History who says that their geology department is reviewing the data and that Neil deGrasse Tyson was "literally dancing in the hallways this morning".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 11/20/2012 04:39 PM
I have a source at the American Museum of Natural History who says that their geology department is reviewing the data and that Neil deGrasse Tyson was "literally dancing in the hallways this morning".

Let me take a shot in guessing what it is....  ;)

1. Any type of sedimentary rocks
2. Some kind of organic material that was known to be purely biological origin

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/20/2012 04:45 PM
I wish it was the biology department and not the geology department...

My bet is also on geological evidence supporting past biology.

At this point, finding more evidence of water will be interesting, but pretty much expected.


heh, I like how the bar for excitement keeps rising....
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jeff Lerner on 11/20/2012 04:56 PM
....even better...the xenoarchaeology department...:)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/20/2012 05:14 PM
....even better...the xenoarchaeology department...:)
+1. :D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 11/20/2012 05:19 PM
...Nah,  xenoarchaeology department, arsenic first contact special team ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/20/2012 05:46 PM
I for one welcome the benevolent rule of our ancient Martian overlords!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: happyflower on 11/20/2012 05:59 PM
Since the information is coming from the SAM instrument and they just finished putting samples of Martian soil in there, the news is related to the soil in some way.

Since SAM is looking for organic compounds, I guess organic compounds probably carbon based have been spotted. Still no proof of life, but a smoking gun.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/20/2012 06:05 PM
Seems too quick almost, from measurement to results to analysis to conclusion to review...

Do they publish a timeline of when they digest samples, and which instruments get a go at the samples?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Alpha_Centauri on 11/20/2012 06:09 PM
Well I have to say that Grotzinger didn't sound that excited. maybe just his style. The only direct quote about it is "This data is gonna be one for the history books", which could be anything.  Given the "exciting" news release about methane, "sorry, it's not there", I wouldn't hold out hopes that it actually is something earth-shattering.

If I heard correctly the interview happened last week.  We can be safe that it's nothing directly related to biology because realistically we'd all know by now, that's not something that could be kept secret.

I'd guess detection of simple organics.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/20/2012 06:18 PM
Well I have to say that Grotzinger didn't sound that exited. maybe just his style. The only direct quote about it is "This data is gonna be one for the history books", which could be anything.  Given the "exiting" news release about methane, "sorry, it's not there", I wouldn't hold out hopes that it actually is something earth-shattering.

If I heard correctly the interview happened last week.  We can be safe that it's nothing directly related to biology because realistically we'd all know by now, that's not something that could be kept secret.
...
Apparently, it HASN'T been kept secret...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Alpha_Centauri on 11/20/2012 06:30 PM
Kept secret =/= no one knows, just that it's not been leaked to the public, which such news would be very quickly.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/20/2012 06:46 PM
Well any announcement that increases the interest in Mars exploration in the corridors of power and maybe its budget is to be welcomed in my book.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 11/20/2012 07:23 PM
SAM has only digested dune sand, if they find any organic in that they will have a nice two years with a lot more organics.

I guess that the really story has to wait for the AGU in two weeks. There is a Curiosity special session.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Alpha_Centauri on 11/20/2012 07:24 PM
Apparently Grotzinger has told SPACE.com that "the news will come out at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union, which takes place Dec. 3-7 in San Francisco."
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: notsorandom on 11/20/2012 07:29 PM
Organic compounds would certainly be an exciting find. Lets assume though that is not what was behind the hints in the NPR article. What else could SAM find that would be so interesting yet not related to life?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: schaban on 11/20/2012 07:47 PM
Organic compounds would certainly be an exciting find. Lets assume though that is not what was behind the hints in the NPR article. What else could SAM find that would be so interesting yet not related to life?
He-3?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 11/20/2012 08:16 PM
Well I have to say that Grotzinger didn't sound that exited. maybe just his style. The only direct quote about it is "This data is gonna be one for the history books", which could be anything.  Given the "exiting" news release about methane, "sorry, it's not there", I wouldn't hold out hopes that it actually is something earth-shattering.
Agreed. Two things people should remember before getting caught up in the speculative hype:
1) Given the capabilities of the SAM instrument suit, *any* successful observation is going to technically be "one for the history books", and has very goods odds of revealing something unexpected.
2) "Exciting" scientists doesn't mean earth shattering for the general public. Anything unexpected (see #1) is likely to be exciting for the people who study mars.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/20/2012 08:23 PM
Well I have to say that Grotzinger didn't sound that exited. maybe just his style. The only direct quote about it is "This data is gonna be one for the history books", which could be anything.  Given the "exiting" news release about methane, "sorry, it's not there", I wouldn't hold out hopes that it actually is something earth-shattering.
Agreed. Two things people should remember before getting caught up in the speculative hype:
1) Given the capabilities of the SAM instrument suit, *any* successful observation is going to technically be "one for the history books", and has very goods odds of revealing something unexpected.
2) "Exciting" scientists doesn't mean earth shattering for the general public. Anything unexpected (see #1) is likely to be exciting for the people who study mars.
Neil deGrasse Tyson dancing in that hallways? It has got to be more interesting than just something unexpected or a successful observation.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 11/20/2012 08:48 PM
It has got to be more interesting than just something unexpected or a successful observation.
Uh huh http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewnews.html?id=1297

The actual discovery which spawned that rumor fest is a pretty good example. Scientists: "Ooh, perchlorate, that's interesting!", public "huh, what?"

I did not mean to imply a successful observation would be news itself.  Rather, SAM is such a sensitive instrument that the first successful observation is quite likely to turn up *something* unexpected.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/20/2012 09:24 PM
Quote
SarcasticRover ‏@SarcasticRover

Not sure what it means, but my new discovery has been code-named "Operation Mind-Reading Alien Slug-Worm."
https://twitter.com/SarcasticRover/status/270970332456837121

and:
Quote
SarcasticRover ‏@SarcasticRover

I'm on a completely different planet doing a science! Literally every thing up here is a "major discovery," okay?
https://twitter.com/SarcasticRover/status/271007537426489344
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/20/2012 10:41 PM
Delving even deeper into the tea-leaves:

Top surface sand is both very simple, and wind-borne.  So if there's something exciting in it, it doesn't have to be local.

The most likely reason it ended up at the geology department is that they had a session already scheduled at the AGU meeting, and decided to use it as the announcement platform, and so they have to have geology peers go over it first.

They did send it far and wide for review, and that's worth noting.

I can wait two weeks, no problem.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/20/2012 11:01 PM
I was thinking something more prosaic like carbonate or shale or clay.  But there is a problem with that; it should have shown up in ChemMin runs...or maybe that is why they had multiple ChemMin runs.

So the scanty evidence points to simple organics but it is hard to believe that organics could survive in the sands of Mars being blown around and exposed to UV and other radiation plus possible perchlorates.  I could see organics being drilled out of a clay outcrop but not in wind-borne dust.  Odd... :-\
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 11/20/2012 11:05 PM
Moving on to regular programming...

11.20.2012

Curiosity Rover Preparing for Thanksgiving Activities

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity completed a touch-and-go inspection of one rock on Sunday, Nov. 18, then pivoted and, on the same day, drove toward a Thanksgiving overlook location.
Last week, Curiosity drove for the first time after spending several weeks in soil-scooping activities at one location. On Friday, Nov. 16, the rover drove 6.2 feet (1.9 meters) to get within arm's reach of a rock called "Rocknest 3." On Sunday, it touched that rock with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) on its arm, and took two 10-minute APXS readings of data about the chemical elements in the rock. Then Curiosity stowed its arm and drove 83 feet (25.3 meters) eastward toward a target called "Point Lake."

"We have done touches before, and we've done goes before, but this is our first 'touch-and-go' on the same day," said Curiosity Mission Manager Michael Watkins of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "It is a good sign that the rover team is getting comfortable with more complex operational planning, which will serve us well in the weeks ahead."

During a Thanksgiving break, the team will use Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) from Point Lake to examine possible routes and targets to the east. A priority is to choose a rock for the first use of the rover's hammering drill, which will collect samples of powder from rock interiors.

Although Curiosity has departed the Rocknest patch of windblown sand and dust where it scooped up soil samples in recent weeks, the sample-handling mechanism on the rover's arm is still holding some soil from the fifth and final scoop collected at Rocknest. The rover is carrying this sample so it can be available for analysis by instruments within the rover if scientists choose that option in coming days.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1394
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 11/21/2012 02:24 AM
So the scanty evidence points to simple organics but it is hard to believe that organics could survive in the sands of Mars being blown around and exposed to UV and other radiation plus possible perchlorates.  I could see organics being drilled out of a clay outcrop but not in wind-borne dust.  Odd... :-\

Not saying I believe that it's organics, but the sand dune was not really an easily mobile, wind-blown dune. Remember it had a clumpy structure (was especially visible in the trenches after scooping). The Rocknest sand dune was not simply a loose pile of sand recently blown into position. It had been there, in that position, for a while.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/21/2012 03:32 AM
Well, the PR says:
"Although Curiosity has departed the Rocknest patch of windblown sand and dust where it scooped up soil samples in recent weeks"
(which in and of itself is odd phrasing - why add "windblown", and why emphasize "dust"?  would have been more natural, in the context of the PR, to say "departed the Rocknest sand patch where it scooped....")

I do agree this did not look like completely loose sand - it was sort of in-betweenish sand - just a bit clumpy.

But sand, by its very nature, was not formed in-situ, and the dune shape does imply that it is being transported.

Here's an idea:

What if the clumpiness is telling them that there's still an underflow going on?   That would make it a geological finding.   SAM might have detected a concentration of volatile in it?  Maybe simple humidity?   That will be enough to pass the "Tyson Dance Test" without making it about organics.

This is also calibrated to the level of "this is for the textbooks" better than the discovery of anything biological in origin.

Well, I definitely have myself convinced.  That's always a good start..
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 11/21/2012 04:36 AM
Not saying I believe that it's organics, but the sand dune was not really an easily mobile, wind-blown dune. Remember it had a clumpy structure (was especially visible in the trenches after scooping).
Very similar behavior has been seen in dust accumulations investigated by other missions.
Quote
The Rocknest sand dune was not simply a loose pile of sand recently blown into position. It had been there, in that position, for a while.
AFAIK mechanism that causes these crusts isn't fully understood, so I would be wary of reading too much into it. In any case, rocknest must be quite recent geologically, meaning that all the conditions fthurber mentioned would still apply even if it's old in human terms.

One note from the Chemin press conference about this material (http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/26549125) roughly 50% of it was "poorly crystalline" or amorphous and not readily identifiable by Chemin. There was a suggestion that some of this might be related to the "interaction of water with rocks".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 11/21/2012 04:48 AM
Neil deGrasse Tyson dancing in that hallways? It has got to be more interesting than just something unexpected or a successful observation.

Keep in mind we're talking about Tyson here. He's a very outwardly enthusiastic person, which is a big part of why he became such a public figure. He's the sort who can get really excited about things that seem trivial to other people.

Organic compounds would certainly be an exciting find. Lets assume though that is not what was behind the hints in the NPR article. What else could SAM find that would be so interesting yet not related to life?
He-3?

No. He-3 would not be a surprise unless there's something inexplicable going on, and it's unimportant at this point in time.

It has got to be more interesting than just something unexpected or a successful observation.
Uh huh http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewnews.html?id=1297

The actual discovery which spawned that rumor fest is a pretty good example. Scientists: "Ooh, perchlorate, that's interesting!", public "huh, what?"

I did not mean to imply a successful observation would be news itself.  Rather, SAM is such a sensitive instrument that the first successful observation is quite likely to turn up *something* unexpected.

The Phoenix perchlorate findings have been prominent in my mind since reading the NPR article. Not saying that it's more perchlorates. Just that I strongly suspect most people will not be "dancing in the hallways" when they hear.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/21/2012 11:03 AM

Here's an idea:

What if the clumpiness is telling them that there's still an underflow going on?   That would make it a geological finding.   SAM might have detected a concentration of volatile in it?  Maybe simple humidity?   That will be enough to pass the "Tyson Dance Test" without making it about organics.

Good point.

I have to wonder if the crust is salt.  I have seen this many times at the beach; the top few millimeters of sand dunes are cemented together with salt evaporate.

This would be big news but not what most people want to hear.  I sort of doubt it passes the dance test though...

Another problem is that SAM cannot detect salt so I am back to the question of what kind of organics can survive on the surface of Mars.  PAHs?

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/21/2012 02:42 PM
Yes - I was telling my wife about how such a flow might be very briny, and realized that:
a) salts might retain some humidity in the off season
b) the way the salt crystallized can tell them a lot about the flow.  Large or small crystals, independent crystals or formed around sand particles, are they linked to each other to form larger solids, etc.
c) the chemical composition of the salts

Regarding SAM, does anyone know how they vaporize the sample, and at what temperature?

A sample with humidity can give a reading even before it is vaporized - if they operate in this mode (i.e. sniffing a cold sample)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 11/21/2012 02:49 PM
There's an article making the rounds, that is in French, quoting the co-investigator of SAM as saying there was no revolutionary discovery to announce:

http://www.cieletespace.fr/node/9823

I don't know French but I put it in an online translator and that's what it seems to say.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Danderman on 11/21/2012 02:59 PM
Yes - I was telling my wife about how such a flow might be very briny, and realized that:
a) salts might retain some humidity in the off season
b) the way the salt crystallized can tell them a lot about the flow.  Large or small crystals, independent crystals or formed around sand particles, are they linked to each other to form larger solids, etc.
c) the chemical composition of the salts

Regarding SAM, does anyone know how they vaporize the sample, and at what temperature?

A sample with humidity can give a reading even before it is vaporized - if they operate in this mode (i.e. sniffing a cold sample)

I would imagine that they probably picked up some indirect evidence of recent water flow from the sample. That would get them all excited, but wouldn't do much for the General Public.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Space Pete on 11/21/2012 03:00 PM
From NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Communications Bob Jacobs ‏(@bnjacobs) via Twitter:

There's out of control parroting regarding Mars Curiosity. The "one for the history books" refers to the mission, not any one new discovery.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/21/2012 03:21 PM
oh well.
It was fun there for a day though....
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Garrett on 11/21/2012 03:41 PM
There's an article making the rounds, that is in French, quoting the co-investigator of SAM as saying there was no revolutionary discovery to announce:

http://www.cieletespace.fr/node/9823

I don't know French but I put it in an online translator and that's what it seems to say.

I'll translate some of it:
Quote
Original French: « Rien de tout cela ! » martèle le Français Michel Cabane, coresponsable scientifique de l'instrument SAM. « Nous ne comprenons pas ce qu'il se passe. Nous n'avons absolument aucune nouvelle éclatante à annoncer ! »

Selon le chercheur du Latmos, SAM fonctionne très bien et fournit des signaux. Mais il n'y a « rien » pour le moment dans les données qui puisse justifier un tel engouement. Les premiers résultats de SAM devraient être annoncés lors du colloque de l'Union géophysique américaine, du 3 au 7 décembre 2012, à San Francisco.


My translation: "Nothing like that at all", insists Frenchman Michael Cabane, scientific co-investigator of the SAM instrument.  "We can't understand what this is all about. We have absolutely no dazzling news to announce!"

According to the Latmos researcher, SAM is working fine and is returning data. But there is "nothing" for the moment in the data that could justify such hype. The first SAM results should be announced during the American Geophysical Union's Fall Meeting , from the 3rd to 7th December 2012 in San Francisco.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/21/2012 04:30 PM
This isn't going to look good for NASA as again it's going to appear to the general public that the agency has made a big fuss about something that turns out to be nothing

If they are going to lay this one on the media then maybe they should think of being more careful what they say around journalists if they don't want it reported in a way that causes them hassle.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lars_J on 11/21/2012 04:40 PM
Yep. This is looking like another "Methane PR fiasco".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 11/21/2012 04:50 PM
Quote
Emily Lakdawalla ‏@elakdawalla

I'm really irritated that people are harshing on Curiosity PI Grotzinger for being excited about his science without giving specifics.
Quote
Emily Lakdawalla ‏@elakdawalla

What do you guys want? For scientists to grant no interviews? For them to be deadpan? To tell you every random idea, most of them wrong?
https://twitter.com/elakdawalla
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/21/2012 04:57 PM
This isn't going to look good for NASA as again it's going to appear to the general public that the agency has made a big fuss about something that turns out to be nothing

If they are going to lay this one on the media then maybe they should think of being more careful what they say around journalists if they don't want it reported in a way that causes them hassle.

Hmmm, I am seeing this a little different.  It seems to me that NASA did not make a "big fuss"; rather it was the media who made the big fuss.  NASA has announced nothing on this subject; it was a just an offhand, ambiguous comment by Grotz that got blown out of proportion. That and some phantom, alleged dance routines by Tyson. ;)

This reaction is to be expected; we are starved for details so that the slightest crumb of a rumor becomes food for endless speculation and I will be the first to admit that I also enjoy the speculation.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/21/2012 05:06 PM
This isn't going to look good for NASA as again it's going to appear to the general public that the agency has made a big fuss about something that turns out to be nothing

If they are going to lay this one on the media then maybe they should think of being more careful what they say around journalists if they don't want it reported in a way that causes them hassle.

Hmmm, I am seeing this a little different.  It seems to me that NASA did not make a "big fuss"; rather it was the media who made the big fuss.  NASA has announced nothing on this subject; it was a just an offhand, ambiguous comment by Grotz that got blown out of proportion. That and some phantom, alleged dance routines by Tyson. ;)

I guess JPL deserves some blame because they sort of starve us for details so that the slightest crumb of a rumor becomes food for endless speculation and I will be the first to admit that I also enjoy the speculation.



Yes the media have probably blown it out of proportion. But I am not so sure I regard Grotz's statement as ambiguous, well not the way I read it and I can see how it could of set off a chain of events in the media.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/21/2012 05:08 PM
Well the original story said:

Quote
PALCA: ... Right now, SAM is working on a Mars soil sample, and Grotzinger says the results are earth-shaking.

GROTZINGER: This data is going to be one for the history books. It's looking really good.

PALCA: Grotzinger can see the pained look on my face as I wait, hoping he'll tell me what the heck he's found.

GROTZINGER: I know I'm killing you.   (LAUGHTER)

So "earth-shaking" is an indirect quote, but supposedly Grotzinger's words

Make of it what you will...

[The transcript is here: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=165513016]

The bottom line: Editing can be everything.  If Grotzinger was given a chance to listen to the final cut of the interview, would he have jumped and said "this is all wrong - you're putting extra meaning into what I said"?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/21/2012 05:27 PM
Well the original story said:

Quote
PALCA: ... Right now, SAM is working on a Mars soil sample, and Grotzinger says the results are earth-shaking.

GROTZINGER: This data is going to be one for the history books. It's looking really good.

PALCA: Grotzinger can see the pained look on my face as I wait, hoping he'll tell me what the heck he's found.

GROTZINGER: I know I'm killing you.   (LAUGHTER)

So "earth-shaking" is an indirect quote, but supposedly Grotzinger's words

Make of it what you will...

[The transcript is here: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=165513016]

The bottom line: Editing can be everything.  If Grotzinger was given a chance to listen to the final cut of the interview, would he have jumped and said "this is all wrong - you're putting extra meaning into what I said"?

Possibly he would and maybe he should have insisted on hearing the final edit?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mduncan36 on 11/21/2012 05:45 PM
Well the original story said:

Quote
PALCA: ... Right now, SAM is working on a Mars soil sample, and Grotzinger says the results are earth-shaking.

GROTZINGER: This data is going to be one for the history books. It's looking really good.

PALCA: Grotzinger can see the pained look on my face as I wait, hoping he'll tell me what the heck he's found.

GROTZINGER: I know I'm killing you.   (LAUGHTER)

So "earth-shaking" is an indirect quote, but supposedly Grotzinger's words

Make of it what you will...

[The transcript is here: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=165513016]

The bottom line: Editing can be everything.  If Grotzinger was given a chance to listen to the final cut of the interview, would he have jumped and said "this is all wrong - you're putting extra meaning into what I said"?

Possibly he would and maybe he should have insisted on hearing the final edit?

Journalists don't give anyone the chance to say what they are going to write. Remember that part of their job is to generate reader interest. NPR appears to have been very successful in that regard. I'm just going to wait and hear what it is for what it is.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/21/2012 07:05 PM
Well the original story said:

Quote
PALCA: ... Right now, SAM is working on a Mars soil sample, and Grotzinger says the results are earth-shaking.

GROTZINGER: This data is going to be one for the history books. It's looking really good.

PALCA: Grotzinger can see the pained look on my face as I wait, hoping he'll tell me what the heck he's found.

GROTZINGER: I know I'm killing you.   (LAUGHTER)

So "earth-shaking" is an indirect quote, but supposedly Grotzinger's words

Make of it what you will...

[The transcript is here: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=165513016]

The bottom line: Editing can be everything.  If Grotzinger was given a chance to listen to the final cut of the interview, would he have jumped and said "this is all wrong - you're putting extra meaning into what I said"?

Possibly he would and maybe he should have insisted on hearing the final edit?

Journalists don't give anyone the chance to say what they are going to write. Remember that part of their job is to generate reader interest. NPR appears to have been very successful in that regard. I'm just going to wait and hear what it is for what it is.

Good point. As you say it's probably best that we wait and see what is said.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: rdale on 11/21/2012 07:54 PM
Quote

Good point. As you say it's probably best that we wait and see what is said.

What a novel idea for an UPDATE thread  8)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/21/2012 08:09 PM
Well..  how about something different to get back on this update thread...

Animation of Curiosity Rover's First 'Touch and Go'


Published on Nov 21, 2012 by JPLnews

Animation shows NASA's Mars Curiosity rover touching a rock with an instrument on its arm, then stowing the arm and driving on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOgfzWhrRf8
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 11/22/2012 12:34 AM
11.21.2012

Spacecraft Monitoring Martian Dust Storm

PASADENA, Calif. -- A Martian dust storm that NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been tracking since last week has also produced atmospheric changes detectable by rovers on Mars.
Using the orbiter's Mars Color Imager, Bruce Cantor of Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, began observing the storm on Nov. 10, and subsequently reported it to the team operating NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The storm came no closer than about 837 miles (1,347 kilometers) from Opportunity, resulting in only a slight drop in atmospheric clarity over that rover, which does not have a weather station.

Halfway around the planet from Opportunity, the NASA Mars rover Curiosity's weather station has detected atmospheric changes related to the storm. Sensors on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), which was provided for Curiosity by Spain, have measured decreased air pressure and a slight rise in overnight low temperature.

"This is now a regional dust storm. It has covered a fairly extensive region with its dust haze, and it is in a part of the planet where some regional storms in the past have grown into global dust hazes," said Rich Zurek, chief Mars scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "For the first time since the Viking missions of the 1970s, we are studying a regional dust storm both from orbit and with a weather station on the surface."

Curiosity's equatorial location and the sensors on REMS, together with the daily global coverage provided by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, provide new advantages compared with what Viking offered with its combination of orbiters and landers. The latest weekly Mars weather report from the orbiter's Mars Color Imager is at http://www.msss.com/msss_images/2012/11/21/ .

Each Martian year lasts about two Earth years. Regional dust storms expanded and affected vast areas of Mars in 2001 and 2007, but not between those years nor since 2007.

"One thing we want to learn is why do some Martian dust storms get to this size and stop growing, while others this size keep growing and go global," Zurek said.

From decades of observing Mars, scientists know there is a seasonal pattern to the largest Martian dust-storm events. The dust-storm season began just a few weeks ago, with the start of southern-hemisphere spring.

Starting on Nov. 16, the Mars Climate Sounder instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter detected a warming of the atmosphere at about 16 miles (25 kilometers) above the storm. Since then, the atmosphere in the region has warmed by about 45 degrees Fahrenheit (25 degrees Celsius). This is due to the dust absorbing sunlight at that height, so it indicates the dust is being lofted well above the surface and the winds are starting to create a dust haze over a broad region.

Warmer temperatures are seen not only in the dustier atmosphere in the south, but also in a hot spot near northern polar latitudes due to changes in the atmospheric circulation. Similar changes affect the pressure measured by Curiosity even though the dust haze is still far away.

Besides the research value in better understanding storm behavior, monitoring the storm is also important for Mars rover operations. If the storm were to go global, the Opportunity rover would be affected most. More dust in the air or falling onto its solar panels would reduce the solar-powered rover's energy supply for daily operations. Curiosity is powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator, rather than solar cells. The main effects of increased dust in the air at its site would be haze in images and increased air temperature.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1395
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/22/2012 03:46 AM
What Did Curiosity Find On Mars? | Exclusive Video

Published on Nov 21, 2012 by VideoFromSpace

Mission scientist for the Mars Science Laboratory, Dr. John Grotzinger, talks to SPACE.com about how the instrumentation on the rover made the find that he calls "one for the history books". Results to be announced early December.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64hvqhgbaLw
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Don2 on 11/22/2012 05:52 AM
If NASA has any brains, they'll shoot down the rumors about organics if they are not true. There is no point letting this get any traction if there is nothing in it.

It wouldn't surprise me if this science result has something to do with the isotope ratios of the gases evolved on heating. Things like carbonates are going to decompose, and if the isotope ratios in the gases are significantly different from the existing atmosphere then that would probably be a very interesting result. It would tell you something about the past atmospheric composition.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: 8900 on 11/22/2012 10:38 AM
I guess the great announcement has something to do with this
(http://cdn.zmescience.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/curiosity-plastic.gif)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 11/23/2012 06:48 PM
Did I lose all my NASA notification emails, or did they stop streaming weekly teleconferences?
Are they thnking about best way to inform us about the new discovery?
Or will they just announce that they maybe found some maybe mineral which maybe means that maybe once there was maybe water on mars?...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: arachnitect on 11/23/2012 07:05 PM
Did I lose all my NASA notification emails, or did they stop streaming weekly teleconferences?
Are they thnking about best way to inform us about the new discovery?
Or will they just announce that they maybe found some maybe mineral which maybe means that maybe once there was maybe water on mars?...

The latest Teleconference was on Nov. 15th (radiation and wind data)

No Telecon this week due to US Thanksgiving holiday

Some new results will apparently be released at the AGU conference in December. There is wild speculation about the nature of those results.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/23/2012 10:03 PM
Did I lose all my NASA notification emails, or did they stop streaming weekly teleconferences?
Are they thnking about best way to inform us about the new discovery?
Or will they just announce that they maybe found some maybe mineral which maybe means that maybe once there was maybe water on mars?...

The latest Teleconference was on Nov. 15th (radiation and wind data)

No Telecon this week due to US Thanksgiving holiday

Some new results will apparently be released at the AGU conference in December. There is wild speculation about the nature of those results.

I have to assume that Grotz is dreading that press conference.  There are sure to be reporters there from the pop press who will hound him about supposed earth-shaking SAM results.   They will try to cross examine him about every word he said.  Ugh.

BTW has anyone else noticed that the larger the new organization, the lamer the questions at these press conferences?  The best questions are asked by Eric Hand of Nature and Emily Lakdawalla of TPS while the dumbed-down question come from the major news orgs....
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Mader Levap on 11/24/2012 09:29 AM
I have to assume that Grotz is dreading that press conference.  There are sure to be reporters there from the pop press who will hound him about supposed earth-shaking SAM results.   They will try to cross examine him about every word he said.  Ugh.
He had it coming. Should be more careful with words.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/24/2012 02:15 PM
I have to assume that Grotz is dreading that press conference.  There are sure to be reporters there from the pop press who will hound him about supposed earth-shaking SAM results.   They will try to cross examine him about every word he said.  Ugh.
He had it coming. Should be more careful with words.

Personally I cannot blame him.  You have to remember that he is a scientist not a PR professional such as a press secretary.   He has better things to do than carefully craft bland press announcements.  Would you rather listen to a press secretary than a scientist?

Considering that he has a full-time, demanding position chief scientist of MSL, I think he does a great job dealing with the press.


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: RigelFive on 11/24/2012 02:55 PM
Have no idea what this news will be about... If the rumor given was a hint presented as something that is "for the history books".  Hope it is simply some new evidence that give dating on the Mars terrain (oldest rocks ever sampled in the solar system).  If this news goes astrobiological, precedence says there will be too much controversy.

What is the impact of something dated older than the Earth/Moon???
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: rdale on 11/24/2012 03:06 PM
What is the impact of something dated older than the Earth/Moon???

Big.

However pondering that probably gets a little too far outside of what you can classify as a "MSL Update"  8)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: RigelFive on 11/24/2012 04:12 PM
No no no.  I tried talking about this stuff on one of those non-update threads.  Somebody said the conversation was on this thread.  This news is so big, it gives you a special dispensation to eminate conjecture on update threads... (Builds the suspense)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/24/2012 04:47 PM
I have to assume that Grotz is dreading that press conference.  There are sure to be reporters there from the pop press who will hound him about supposed earth-shaking SAM results.   They will try to cross examine him about every word he said.  Ugh.
He had it coming. Should be more careful with words.

If you read the transcript, you see that it is very highly edited, and does thing like associate Grotzinger's "it" with some non-Grotzinger content.

This is also how you make an exciting trailer for a boring movie.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/24/2012 05:50 PM
I have to assume that Grotz is dreading that press conference.  There are sure to be reporters there from the pop press who will hound him about supposed earth-shaking SAM results.   They will try to cross examine him about every word he said.  Ugh.
He had it coming. Should be more careful with words.

If you read the transcript, you see that it is very highly edited, and does thing like associate Grotzinger's "it" with some non-Grotzinger content.

This is also how you make an exciting trailer for a boring movie.



Just hope it isn't too boring!

Not too bad an article by newspaper standards speculating on what could be announced.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/across-the-universe/2012/nov/23/curiosity-rover-life-mars
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/25/2012 11:00 PM

Just hope it isn't too boring!


It is probably quite interesting to geologists but boring / incomprehensible to the public.  My bet is on something like carbonates with an unusual C13/C12 ratio.  Maybe PAHs or phyllosilicates. 

As we all know, PAHs are "organic" but not necessarily biological, actually almost certainly not biological in this case.

The clues are skimpy;  all we have are as follows:
1) It was found in loose, wind-borne soil; not a place where complex organics are likely to survive.
2) It was detected by SAM, but SAM has a large array of detectors for various chemicals.
3) It did not show up in the first ChemMin run which means it was part of the amorphous component.  I had assumed that this was volcanic glass, but maybe there is something else mixed in.  Can ChemMin detect carbonates or phyllosicates?
4) Neil deGrasse Tyson was dancing in the halls.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 11/26/2012 01:17 AM
3) It did not show up in the first ChemMin run which means it was part of the amorphous component.
I wouldn't assume this. It's quite possible Chemin saw some hints of interesting stuff that wasn't mentioned in the press conference because they didn't have a solid interpretation ("wow that looks like **** but it's right at the detection limit" etc.) Also worth noting they have done many Chemcam and some APXS measurements of the same material, without any comment on the results.
Quote
Can ChemMin detect carbonates or phyllosicates?
Yes. See http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-012-9905-1/fulltext.html

As a reminder, MSL instrument description papers are currently open access here: http://link.springer.com/journal/11214/170/1/page/1

However, after re-reading the original NPR transcript, I'm not convinced there is any specific "big news" at all. For the NPR reporter, the "big news" was mainly a hook to hang his story on, and I suspect Grotzinger would have been more circumspect if he actually saw something really big.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/26/2012 12:54 PM
3) It did not show up in the first ChemMin run which means it was part of the amorphous component.
I wouldn't assume this. It's quite possible Chemin saw some hints of interesting stuff that wasn't mentioned in the press conference because they didn't have a solid interpretation ("wow that looks like **** but it's right at the detection limit" etc.) Also worth noting they have done many Chemcam and some APXS measurements of the same material, without any comment on the results.
Quote
Can ChemMin detect carbonates or phyllosicates?
Yes. See http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-012-9905-1/fulltext.html

As a reminder, MSL instrument description papers are currently open access here: http://link.springer.com/journal/11214/170/1/page/1


Good point; there were indeed multiple runs of ChemMin that I found a bit curious at the time.  APXS also.   Interesting.

Thanks for the ChemMin link; great reading.  As with everything about MSL, the more I look into it, the more amazing it seems.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/26/2012 05:00 PM
3) It did not show up in the first ChemMin run which means it was part of the amorphous component.
I wouldn't assume this. It's quite possible Chemin saw some hints of interesting stuff that wasn't mentioned in the press conference because they didn't have a solid interpretation ("wow that looks like **** but it's right at the detection limit" etc.) Also worth noting they have done many Chemcam and some APXS measurements of the same material, without any comment on the results.
Quote
Can ChemMin detect carbonates or phyllosicates?
Yes. See http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-012-9905-1/fulltext.html

As a reminder, MSL instrument description papers are currently open access here: http://link.springer.com/journal/11214/170/1/page/1

However, after re-reading the original NPR transcript, I'm not convinced there is any specific "big news" at all. For the NPR reporter, the "big news" was mainly a hook to hang his story on, and I suspect Grotzinger would have been more circumspect if he actually saw something really big.

It doesn't matter if that is the case or not because if nothing much is announced there will be only organisation getting the blame by the public and you can bet it will not be the press.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 11/27/2012 11:24 PM
11.27.2012
Regional Dust Storm Dissipating

PASADENA, Calif. -- A regional dust storm on Mars, tracked from orbit since Nov. 10, appears to be abating rather than going global.
"During the past week, the regional storm weakened and contracted significantly," said Bruce Cantor of Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. Cantor uses the Mars Color Imager camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to monitor storms on the Red Planet.

Effects of the storm on global air-pressure patterns have been detected at ground level by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity.

"We are getting lots of good data about this storm," said Mark Richardson of Ashima Research, Pasadena, Calif. He is a co-investigator both on REMS and on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Mars Climate Sounder instrument, which has been detecting widespread effects of the current storm on atmospheric temperatures.

Researchers anticipate that the unprecedented combination of a near-equatorial weather station at ground level, and daily orbital observations during Mars' dust-storm season, may provide information about why some dust storms grow larger than others.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1397
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: anonymous on 11/28/2012 12:21 PM
According to Mashable, the big Curiosity discovery is a big misunderstanding:

http://mashable.com/2012/11/27/curiosity-rover-discovery-npr/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Ares67 on 11/28/2012 12:39 PM
According to Mashable, the big Curiosity discovery is a big misunderstanding:

http://mashable.com/2012/11/27/curiosity-rover-discovery-npr/

"A big misunderstanding?"

So, Mr. Grotzinger, next time you should remember:

IN SPACE NO ONE CAN HEAR YOU SCREAM

... but down here at NSF we are all ears - especially regarding alien life forms on Mars!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCyIdRFGQgw

 ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Keeval on 11/28/2012 07:26 PM

Apparently several italian news sources are quoting Charles Elachi, director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (who is currently at a conference at the University Sapienza of Rome) as saying:

 
Quote
that the data is still preliminary, to be verified, but Curiosity may have discovered "organic molecules, not biological."

One of the articles http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.repubblica.it%2Fscienze%2F2012%2F11%2F28%2Fnews%2Fcuriosity_marte_forse_trovati_precursori_vita-47602504%2F%3Fref%3DHRER2-1 (http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.repubblica.it%2Fscienze%2F2012%2F11%2F28%2Fnews%2Fcuriosity_marte_forse_trovati_precursori_vita-47602504%2F%3Fref%3DHRER2-1)

I can't find any other sources for this though.


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: rdale on 11/28/2012 07:39 PM
English comments made off the record, translated to Italian, and then back to English probably don't have too much backing :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 11/28/2012 08:21 PM
What could have significance, since this is top-layer sand, is if they find molecules of a type and in a concentration that implies they are currently being produced.   Doesn't have to be biological, but will indicate more processes at play.

Would, could, should - we'll find out next week.  And in the coming couple of years.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 11/29/2012 04:43 PM
I was sent this by a former co-worker.  Looks like NBC News decided to join in on the hype last night.  It's mostly a puff piece, nothing new to report.  But strange they decided to fixate on this after it was already walked back and go the "life on mars?" route.
http://video.msnbc.msn.com/nightly-news/50002282/#50002282

The JPL guy interviewed made it sound like the announcement most likely would be about the detection of organics.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/29/2012 05:45 PM
3) It did not show up in the first ChemMin run which means it was part of the amorphous component.
I wouldn't assume this. It's quite possible Chemin saw some hints of interesting stuff that wasn't mentioned in the press conference because they didn't have a solid interpretation ("wow that looks like **** but it's right at the detection limit" etc.) Also worth noting they have done many Chemcam and some APXS measurements of the same material, without any comment on the results.
Quote
Can ChemMin detect carbonates or phyllosicates?
Yes. See http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-012-9905-1/fulltext.html


I am working through the ChemMin and SAM technical specs now and, yes indeed, ChemMin (and SAM) can detect phyllosilicates (clays).  Clays are not well crystallized so, if I am reading it right, their diffraction patterns have broadened peak making detection a little more difficult than fully-crystallized minerals.  Statistical methods might have to be used to match the diffraction pattern of some clays or clay mixes. This might explain the multiple runs with ChemMin and exclusion of any mention of clays from the initial announcement.


A followup with SAM and the APXS might have been needed to nail down the clay identification.

Of course this is just speculation.  It is probably something entirely different such as some sort of evaporate, carbonates, PAHs, etc.

PAH's would certainly be in line with what Dr. Elachi noted about non-biological organics as would racemic organics.


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/29/2012 05:55 PM
I was sent this by a former co-worker.  Looks like NBC News decided to join in on the hype last night.  It's mostly a puff piece, nothing new to report.  But strange they decided to fixate on this after it was already walked back and go the "life on mars?" route.
http://video.msnbc.msn.com/nightly-news/50002282/#50002282

The JPL guy interviewed made it sound like the announcement most likely would be about the detection of organics.


Not according to this new press release from the JPL.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/m/news/index.cfm?release=2012-377

Quote
Rumors and speculation that there are major new findings from the mission at this early stage are incorrect. The news conference will be an update about first use of the rover's full array of analytical instruments to investigate a drift of sandy soil. One class of substances Curiosity is checking for is organic compounds -- carbon-containing chemicals that can be ingredients for life. At this point in the mission, the instruments on the rover have not detected any definitive evidence of Martian organics.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 11/29/2012 05:59 PM
Right from JPL:

"At this point in the mission, the instruments on the rover have not detected any definitive evidence of Martian organics."

So much for PAHs...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 11/29/2012 06:04 PM
Right from JPL:

"At this point in the mission, the instruments on the rover have not detected any definitive evidence of Martian organics."

So much for PAHs...

Yes well so much for all this fuss then.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 11/29/2012 07:32 PM

Apparently several italian news sources are quoting Charles Elachi, director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (who is currently at a conference at the University Sapienza of Rome) as saying:

 
Quote
that the data is still preliminary, to be verified, but Curiosity may have discovered "organic molecules, not biological."

One of the articles http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.repubblica.it%2Fscienze%2F2012%2F11%2F28%2Fnews%2Fcuriosity_marte_forse_trovati_precursori_vita-47602504%2F%3Fref%3DHRER2-1 (http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.repubblica.it%2Fscienze%2F2012%2F11%2F28%2Fnews%2Fcuriosity_marte_forse_trovati_precursori_vita-47602504%2F%3Fref%3DHRER2-1)

I can't find any other sources for this though.




Charles Elachi is only a  director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory so he is not part of the science team. He is a bad source for news. He knows only what anybody can read. So were is the hard facts? The press conference on monday in san francisco will be the first point to go. The AGU session on monday will yield what we want to know.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: StephenB on 11/29/2012 08:11 PM
From a Fox article (http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012/11/29/too-soon-to-declare-life-on-mars-nasa-says/):
Quote
"This is going to be a disappointment," said Chris McKay, a NASA space scientist at Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif. "The press description of the SAM results as 'earthshaking' is, in my view, an unfortunate exaggeration.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Ares67 on 11/29/2012 08:54 PM
Life on Mars... Remember the hype of 1996?  ::)

NASA, with those "Life on Mars" rumors before whatever will be announced in that official press release on Monday... you shot yourself in the foot again!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 11/29/2012 10:17 PM
NASA ... [snip] ... you shot yourself in the foot again!
I was under the impression most of the hype was from outside NASA.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: The Off Topic Sheriff on 11/29/2012 10:39 PM
An off topic alarm went off. Trimmed. Keep on the thread title of updates.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 11/29/2012 11:46 PM
Totally ON-TOPIC:

11.29.2012

Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Update Set In San Francisco About Curiosity Mars Rover

PASADENA, Calif. -- The next news conference about the NASA Mars rover Curiosity will be held at 9 a.m. Monday, Dec. 3, in San Francisco at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU).
Rumors and speculation that there are major new findings from the mission at this early stage are incorrect. The news conference will be an update about first use of the rover's full array of analytical instruments to investigate a drift of sandy soil. One class of substances Curiosity is checking for is organic compounds -- carbon-containing chemicals that can be ingredients for life. At this point in the mission, the instruments on the rover have not detected any definitive evidence of Martian organics.

The Mars Science Laboratory Project and its Curiosity rover are less than four months into a two-year prime mission to investigate whether conditions in Mars' Gale Crater may have been favorable for microbial life. Curiosity is exceeding all expectations for a new mission with all of the instruments and measurement systems performing well. This is spectacular for such a complex system, and one that is operated so far away on Mars by people here on planet Earth. The mission already has found an ancient riverbed on the Red Planet, and there is every expectation for remarkable discoveries still to come.

Audio and visuals from the briefing also will be streamed online at: http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1398

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 11/30/2012 04:17 AM
back to normal status reports:

Curiosity Roves Again

Published on Nov 29, 2012 by JPLnews

After spending six weeks doing science investigations at Rocknest, NASA's Curiosity Mars rover is on the move again to Point Lake and a place to try out the drill.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QApb9l2JAbQ
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 11/30/2012 07:19 AM
The MER pages have odometry and sol stats.  Are similar stats being recorded online for Curosity?  I have not seen any.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 11/30/2012 11:59 PM
The MER pages have odometry and sol stats.  Are similar stats being recorded online for Curosity?  I have not seen any.

I sent an email a couple weeks ago suggesting odometry would be a nice addition, along with a few other stats if possible. No response, but we'll see if they find the time to throw in some fun bits like that.

There's a couple threads over on UMSF related to odometry. I hope Chris doesn't mind me linking to them:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=7457
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=7442&st=75&start=75

Also, if you really, really want a sense of where the rover has traveled so far, you MUST try out the "Explore Curiosity" flash widget on the MSL homepage.

Unfortunately, the terrain is not filled in with detail from the MSL imagery, and robotic arm operations are not included, but the topology is pretty high resolution, and you can go back to Sol 1 and let it play through the drives so far. You can spin around the rover in 3-D and admire the highly detailed model. The suspension even actuates as it rolls over the terrain.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 12/01/2012 12:55 AM
Thanks for that, I am glad I am not the only one who misses that data!

I have been using the Google Earth files from UMSF to work out the odometry but they are 1) rough and 2) going to be increasingly tedious as the distance increases.

So far I calculate Curiosity as having averaged about 4 m per sol, compared with 11 m per sol for Oppotunity and 4 m per sol for Spirit (not including the time bogged from May 2009 to end of mission).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 12/01/2012 11:03 PM
NASA ... [snip] ... you shot yourself in the foot again!
I was under the impression most of the hype was from outside NASA.

Exactly.  NASA was not behind the hype; it was the press and over-eager bloggers.

BTW it looks like there was another SAM run of the wind ripple sand on Sol 114.  Apparently this is to solidify their SAM findings before the AGU (and the press conference) on Monday.  So whatever they found it will be of great interest to planetary geologists but not so much to the jaded public.  Interesting Isotopes or carbonates or clays etc....maybe.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 12/03/2012 04:05 PM
Hmm after so much hype, now no one is watching the ultimate briefing?  ;)

ustream.tv/nasajpl  (http://ustream.tv/nasajpl)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 12/03/2012 04:10 PM
Apparently Curiosity found perchlorate....

"We picked the right place; we landed on an ancient riverbed." - Michael Meyer
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/03/2012 04:19 PM
Hmm after so much hype, now no one is watching the ultimate briefing?  ;)

ustream.tv/nasajpl  (http://ustream.tv/nasajpl)

I just jumped in a little late. As forecast once the rumors died down, they're excited about running both SAM and ChemMin for the first time, and sharing the results. Some discussion of APXS, too.

They were going for "ordinary" Martian samples for the first samples so they could compare to results from other missions. Their sample looks exactly like what they were going for.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/03/2012 04:25 PM
Lots of details being shared. I am not going to be able to keep up.

First screen is the bulk gasses from the first SAM run. Decent amount of water vapor.

Second screen is deuterium to hydrogen ratio. Past measurements from earth suggested seasonal variation of D-H. SAM shows high deuterium ratio compared to earth.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/03/2012 04:28 PM
And some talk about possible perchlorates based on the gases evolved. Not confirmed, but they would expect these SAM findings if there were some perchlorates breaking down in the sample.

Some talk about having found simple organic compounds and are trying to confirm they're from the sample, not MSL contamination. I missed the first mention of it.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 12/03/2012 04:28 PM
JPL press release.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/m/news/index.cfm?release=2012-380
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/03/2012 04:34 PM
Grotzinger is tying the results of each instrument together. Again...I couldn't keep up enough to reasonably summarize what he's saying (I have to keep up the illusion that I'm working, too).

I thought it interesting, however, how he's also linking DAN, RAD, and REMS to the work done by APXS, ChemCam, ChemMin, and SAM. These environmental instruments provide the context in which these samples lie...they know for the first time, for example, the radiation exposure of their sample at location it was taken, rather than as global averages, which affects the formation and breakdown of various compounds in the soil.


(EDIT - A couple minor edits for clarification)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/03/2012 04:48 PM
Grotzinger closed by saying the process is not going to be sudden discovery, but gradual, careful, systematic collection and analysis of data.

Now moving to questions.

Q: How do we find out if the organics are Martian or not?

A: Grotzinger - Paul will answer, but for starters, there's some uncertainty we tried to eliminate by making sure the instrument is working right, and eliminate contamination. Brought up possibility of also being from meteors, not just from MSL. If confirmed Martian, next question is abiotic or biotic.
A: Paul Mahaffy - Can use the organic check sample if serious concern to compare for residuals that don't show up in the blank (if something shows up in the blank that should not be there, it's contamination). Before that, though, they do several empty runs.


Q (Emily L - Planetary Society) - Can determine if the compounds, especially chlorinated compounds, were in the soil, or formed as a result of sample handling, heating, etc?

A: Paul - Possible, or likely the heating formed the compounds detected
(My addition - would imply they know the elements present, but need to figure out what they came from)


Q: What does the high deuterium ratio and the presence of perchlorates mean?

A: Paul - Seeing not just heavy hydrogen, but also carbon, oxygen, and expecting to find heavy nitrogen, elevated too. Lighter isotopes are lost to space more easily, so this is expected. Biological processes would concentrate lighter isotopes, however, so precise ratio is interesting.

Perchlorates still unconfirmed. Oxygen and chlorine evolved, possible from calcium perchlorate.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/03/2012 05:02 PM
Q (Joe Palka, NPR) - Do we think the chlorine came from perchlorate salts when heated?

A (Paul) - Unconfirmed, but likely. Came out at the right time in the heating process.


Q (Rob Reynolds, Al Jazeera) - In laymans terms, what is the most important or unexpected finding so far, and 2nd what does the recent hype say about the level of interest from laymen?

A (Grotzinger) - I guess I'll take that one (audience laughs). For the second part of the Q, I guess we have to be careful what we say. Things that we think are great discoveries, but they aren't that interesting publicly. Interest comes after we have a clear understanding what we found (very, very poor paraphrase on my part)

A (Michael Meyer) - Spectacular that we found we landed on an ancient riverbed.


Q (I missed the exact question)

A (Grotzinger) - Spectacular data return. When you get your first sample, and it's working, you get really excited. When you get second sample, and consistent results, then we're really doing science.


Q - If the organics are from Mars, how do you tell if biotic?

A (Paul) - Carbon isotopes especially. Filter out geologic and meteor ratios (meteors bring material to Mars should show same ratios as meteors studied on earth).

Q - (missed the question)

A (Grotzinger) - Lots of popular focus on water, not a lot on other necessities of life. Chemistry-wise, organics are being found common in the solar system (references Messenger's recent Mercury findings). Now seeing hints of energy bearing compounds (perchlorates).

Q (Kelly Beedy, Sky and Telescope) - Are the methane compounds indigenous. What are implications of 5x D-H ratio compared to earth.

A (Paul) - Probably the methane compounds (methyl chlorine) formed in SAM. Probably not, for example, from UV reactions.

Lighter hydrogen more rapidly escapes to space than deuterium. What will be interesting is looking for REALLY old trapped water (hydrates), if that water has lower D-H ratio, good reference to determine escape rate.


(EDIT - added a few more details that from memory were mentioned on the question about necessities for life)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/03/2012 05:13 PM
Q (Dan Simon, CNN) - People love photographs. What have you learned from the photos. Process of getting back to earth, and timeline.

A (Ken Edgett) - Magic of radio. 17 cameras. 4 of them are color. These images go on the website immediately, faster than even I get to see them, unprocessed. Do some processing for important images.

A (Paul) - Adds they use satellites, have bandwidth constraints


Q (no name) - If these are just carbonates, that's not exciting, what else do you look for?

A (Paul) - If we do this on earth, we see huge variety of compounds. On Mars, we're seeing simpler results. We're looking to see what they are. If life is involved, we expected lots of variety in the organics we find.


Q - We see clay and calcium oxide in the results, plus CO2 gas. Could this come from calcium carbonate (limestone)?

A (Paul) - No, the CO2 probably does not come from calcium carbonate. Evolves at too low temperature. Maybe from iron or mag-carbonate


Q (San Fran Chronicle) - Do either SAM or ChemMin detect chirality? If not, is that significant?

A (Paul) - No, not with these compounds. It's for a broad chemical survey. For nitriles, we can do chirality.* Wet chemistry experiments better for that.
(* Really specific detail. I think I heard that right, but don't quote me on it without confirming elsewhere)


Q (Tim Olsen, Earth Mag) - Future stops and sampling?

A (Grotzinger) - (References named future stops.) Will use ChemCam. Undecided on contact operations over the next couple days. Want to keep moving to find a target for first drill ops before the holidays.


 - End of presentation -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 12/03/2012 05:19 PM
Thanks for doing that.

Sounds both interesting and promising for what results we may get in the future. Glad to see Grotzinger addressed about the press fuss due to his comment from earlier on.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jumpjack on 12/03/2012 05:37 PM
Where could I download the conference from? My connection broke up in the crucial moments of Grotzinger's replies!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 12/03/2012 06:58 PM


 - End of presentation -

Thanks!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 12/03/2012 07:58 PM
Where could I download the conference from? My connection broke up in the crucial moments of Grotzinger's replies!
As usual, the press conference is archived on JPLs ustream channel: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/27478475
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 12/04/2012 01:05 AM
NASA | Curiosity Rover Shakes, Bakes, and Tastes Mars with SAM

Published on Dec 3, 2012 by NASAexplorer
NASA's Curiosity rover analyzed its first solid sample of Mars with a variety of instruments, including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite. Developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., SAM is a portable chemistry lab tucked inside the Curiosity rover. SAM examines the chemistry of samples it ingests, checking particularly for chemistry relevant to whether an environment can support or could have supported life. Learn more about how SAM processes samples by watching this video!

This video is public domain and can be downloaded at http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a020000/a020100/a020193/index.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXaa4_02Edw
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 12/04/2012 01:30 AM
and now for something entirely different !!!

Feature                                                                    Dec. 3, 2012

NASA's Curiosity Rover Wants Your Vote

   TIME magazine has nominated NASA's most technologically advanced rover yet as one of its nearly 40 candidates for the "Person of the Year" designation. Describing the sole robotic nominee as the "best car in the solar system" that captured the attention of millions when it completed a fraught landing sequence with seamless grace, TIME is giving readers a chance to cast their vote for the venerable spacecraft.

Visit the TIME poll to cast your vote before 11:59 p.m. on Dec. 12. The people's choice winner will be announced on Dec. 14.

A real-time ranking of all the nominees, including Curiosity, is available at http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html.

For more information about Curiosity and other Mars missions, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lee Jay on 12/04/2012 03:05 AM
A real-time ranking of all the nominees, including Curiosity, is available at http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html (http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html).

It warms my heart to see Karl Rove dead last.

The best car in the solar system, huh?  4 cm/s top speed, wasn't it?  Hmmm...I would call it the best accessorized car in the solar system, and certainly I'd give it tops for most unusual power plant and coolest car-carrier delivery truck, but I don't think I'd want to drive it to work.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 12/04/2012 06:01 AM
I like the chloromethane derivates discovered. Curiosity is delivering the exact same results than Viking. Viking sampled a surface-sand and they found chloromethane and dichloromethane. They published that they came to the conclusion that is was from cleaning solvents they used. I think we should rethink that. I think they did the same experiment like curiosity and they got the same results.

If SAM gets a better sample they will find something different. Sand dune sand was choosen, because it was the material to be most likely free of organics.


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 12/04/2012 10:12 AM
I like the chloromethane derivates discovered. Curiosity is delivering the exact same results than Viking. Viking sampled a surface-sand and they found chloromethane and dichloromethane. They published that they came to the conclusion that is was from cleaning solvents they used. I think we should rethink that. I think they did the same experiment like curiosity and they got the same results.

If SAM gets a better sample they will find something different. Sand dune sand was choosen, because it was the material to be most likely free of organics.


It is is not contamination one possible explanation is that perchlorates (detected here and at the Phoenix site) in the soil are reacting with organics to produce chlorinated methane compounds.  There is a chemical decomposition mode for SAM that should detect organics without heating.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 12/04/2012 12:26 PM
A real-time ranking of all the nominees, including Curiosity, is available at http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html (http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html).

It warms my heart to see Karl Rove dead last.

The best car in the solar system, huh?  4 cm/s top speed, wasn't it?  Hmmm...I would call it the best accessorized car in the solar system, and certainly I'd give it tops for most unusual power plant and coolest car-carrier delivery truck, but I don't think I'd want to drive it to work.

You do realize that North Korea's Kim Jong Un is currently in first place.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: notsorandom on 12/04/2012 01:04 PM
A real-time ranking of all the nominees, including Curiosity, is available at http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html (http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html).

It warms my heart to see Karl Rove dead last.

The best car in the solar system, huh?  4 cm/s top speed, wasn't it?  Hmmm...I would call it the best accessorized car in the solar system, and certainly I'd give it tops for most unusual power plant and coolest car-carrier delivery truck, but I don't think I'd want to drive it to work.

You do realize that North Korea's Kim Jong Un is currently in first place.
With an order of magnitude more positive votes than the next highest. Perhaps a certain Southeast Asian country may be stuffing the ballot box.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 12/04/2012 03:43 PM
Why no discussion of potential iron or mag-carbonates?  I would think that this is fairly significant.  There seems to be a carbonate mystery on Mars; i.e. where is it?  Does this help address that question?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 12/04/2012 04:31 PM
A real-time ranking of all the nominees, including Curiosity, is available at http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html (http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2128881_2129111_2129112,00.html).

It warms my heart to see Karl Rove dead last.

The best car in the solar system, huh?  4 cm/s top speed, wasn't it?  Hmmm...I would call it the best accessorized car in the solar system, and certainly I'd give it tops for most unusual power plant and coolest car-carrier delivery truck, but I don't think I'd want to drive it to work.

You do realize that North Korea's Kim Jong Un is currently in first place.
With an order of magnitude more positive votes than the next highest. Perhaps a certain Southeast Asian country may be stuffing the ballot box.

I suggest a Kim Jong Un thread, or even better, a full section.  With unicorns!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 12/04/2012 04:33 PM
I like the chloromethane derivates discovered. Curiosity is delivering the exact same results than Viking. Viking sampled a surface-sand and they found chloromethane and dichloromethane. They published that they came to the conclusion that is was from cleaning solvents they used. I think we should rethink that. I think they did the same experiment like curiosity and they got the same results.

If SAM gets a better sample they will find something different. Sand dune sand was choosen, because it was the material to be most likely free of organics.


It is is not contamination one possible explanation is that perchlorates (detected here and at the Phoenix site) in the soil are reacting with organics to produce chlorinated methane compounds.  There is a chemical decomposition mode for SAM that should detect organics without heating.

FYI, that's what was being referred to in this question from the presentation (I should have written "methane compounds") - perchlorates reacting with the carbon in the sample on heating to produce chloromethanes:

Quote
Q (Emily L - Planetary Society) - Can determine if the compounds, especially chlorinated compounds, were in the soil, or formed as a result of sample handling, heating, etc?

A: Paul - Possible, or likely the heating formed the compounds detected
(My addition - would imply they know the elements present, but need to figure out what they came from)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Danderman on 12/04/2012 04:47 PM
There is now a special thread for discussing scientific results HERE:


http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=30520.0

Discussion of the science in that thread will keep this thread available for updates and news.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 12/04/2012 04:51 PM
I like the chloromethane derivates discovered. Curiosity is delivering the exact same results than Viking. Viking sampled a surface-sand and they found chloromethane and dichloromethane. They published that they came to the conclusion that is was from cleaning solvents they used. I think we should rethink that. I think they did the same experiment like curiosity and they got the same results.

Did all three SAM runs get the same amount of chlorinated methane?  If so, that would seem to argue against earthly contamination as the source of methane, right?  Rather it would seem to argue for some sort of chemical reaction between CO2 or carbonates plus H2O with perchlorates when heated, maybe...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 12/05/2012 01:18 AM
The MTBSTFA they took with them might be the source for the organics. I can not remember if they showed all three runs separatly, but if they had a good clue where the carbon comes from they would have reported in the science session.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lobo on 12/05/2012 11:49 PM
It warms my heart to see Karl Rove dead last.


It warms my Heart more that Axelrod didn't even make the list...heheheh
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 12/06/2012 01:09 AM
12.05.2012
Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Orbiter Spies Where Rover's Cruise Stage Hit Mars

During the 10 minutes before the NASA Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft entered the Martian atmosphere to deliver the rover Curiosity to the surface, the spacecraft shed its cruise stage, which had performed vital functions during the flight from Earth, and then jettisoned two 165-pound (75-kilogram) blocks of tungsten to gain aerodynamic lift.
Cameras on the NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have imaged impact scars where the tungsten blocks and the broken-apart cruise stage hit about 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of where Curiosity landed on Aug. 5, 2012, PDT (Aug. 6, UTC).

The images from the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera are online at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16456 .

Although hundreds of new impact sites have been imaged on Mars, researchers do not get independent information about the initial size, velocity, density, strength, or impact angle of the objects. For the Mars Science Laboratory hardware, such information is known, so study of this impact field will provide information on impact processes and Mars surface and atmospheric properties.

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been examining Mars with six science instruments since 2006. Now in an extended mission, the orbiter continues to provide insights about the planet's ancient environments and about how processes such as wind, meteorite impacts and seasonal frosts are continuing to affect the Martian surface today. This mission has returned more data about Mars than all other orbital and surface missions combined.

More than 27,000 images taken by HiRISE are available for viewing on the instrument team's website: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu . Each observation by this telescopic camera covers several square miles, or square kilometers, and can reveal features as small as a desk.

HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson. The instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter project is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, also in Pasadena. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1402
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 12/08/2012 03:03 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (Dec. 7, 2012): Rover Results at Rocknest

Published on Dec 7, 2012 by JPLnews
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover team wraps up its scientific study at Rocknest.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvrw486cFsI

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 12/12/2012 12:03 AM
12.11.2012
Self-Portrait of Curiosity's 'Stunt Double' 

Camera and robotic-arm maneuvers for taking a self-portrait of the NASA Curiosity rover on Mars were checked first, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., using the main test rover for the Curiosity.

The Vehicle System Test Bed rover is the closest double in existence for Curiosity. The rover team typically uses this test rover at JPL to try new maneuvers before sending commands for those maneuvers to Curiosity. This self-portrait of the Vehicle System Test Bed rover inside JPL's In Situ Instrument Laboratory resulted from doing that pre-testing of the commands for Curiosity's self-portrait, which is online at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16457 .

Curiosity used its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera, mounted on a turret at the end of its arm, for the self-portrait. The test rover used an engineering model of MAHLI. The rover's arm, about 7 feet (2.1 meters) long, does not appear in the image. It was positioned out of the shot in the images or portions of images used in the mosaic.

Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, developed, built and operates MAHLI and the MAHLI engineering model. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project and the mission's Curiosity rover for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Curiosity and the mission's Vehicle System Test Bed rover were designed and built at JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
 
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=4935

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16457
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 12/14/2012 02:48 PM
I found this nice Sol 125 navcam pano over on unmannedspaceflight.com, and I'm surprised no one has been mentioning these images.
http://www.db-prods.net/marsroversimages/Curiosity/2012/Sol125_pano.jpg

Look at how much darker the sky is on the left flank of Mount Sharp than elsewhere.  Is that a dust storm?  I've been really surprised at how dynamic and noticeable the changes in weather have been.  The MER rovers observed weather changes, but I don't recall MER images of dust clouds rolling in like this, cutting visibility in only one region of the sky.

There probably were and I missed them, but weather here does seem more active.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Hungry4info3 on 12/14/2012 04:34 PM
Is that a dust storm?  I've been really surprised at how dynamic and noticeable the changes in weather have been.  The MER rovers observed weather changes, but I don't recall MER images of dust clouds rolling in like this, cutting visibility in only one region of the sky.
I don't believe it's a dust storm. The scattering properties of the air are a lot different than what we're used to on Earth since the Martian air has larger scattering particles in it (dust). The Martian sky is not a pure result of Rayleigh scattering, so, unlike Earth, the sky won't be one brightness all around a certain elevation. There's forward scattering from dust to illuminate the sky in roughly the sun's direction, and backscattering off dust (or reflection if you will) to illuminate the sky in the opposite direction. In the middle, these effects are weaker.

At least that's how I understand it. I could be wrong, and if so, please correct me.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 12/16/2012 09:47 PM
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=29703.0;attach=485042

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00129/mhli/0129MH0075001001E1_DXXX.jpg

Are these gypsum veins running through the cracks in the sandstone?
Or a salt?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 12/19/2012 10:06 PM
12.18.2012
Curiosity Rover Explores 'Yellowknife Bay'

PASADENA, Calif. -- The NASA Mars rover Curiosity this week is driving within a shallow depression called "Yellowknife Bay," providing information to help researchers choose a rock to drill.
Using Curiosity's percussive drill to collect a sample from the interior of a rock, a feat never before attempted on Mars, is the mission's priority for early 2013. After the powdered-rock sample is sieved and portioned by a sample-processing mechanism on the rover's arm, it will be analyzed by instruments inside Curiosity.

Yellowknife Bay is within a different type of terrain from what the rover has traversed since landing inside Mars' Gale Crater on Aug. 5, PDT (Aug. 6, UTC). The terrain Curiosity has entered is one of three types that intersect at a location dubbed "Glenelg," chosen as an interim destination about two weeks after the landing.

Curiosity reached the lip of a 2-foot (half-meter) descent into Yellowknife Bay with a 46-foot (14-meter) drive on Dec. 11. The next day, a drive of about 86 feet (26.1 meters) brought the rover well inside the basin. The team has been employing the Mast Camera (Mastcam) and the laser-wielding Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) for remote-sensing studies of rocks along the way.

On Dec. 14, Curiosity drove about 108 feet (32.8 meters) to reach rock targets of interest called "Costello" and "Flaherty." Researchers used the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) at the end of the rover's arm to examine the targets. After finishing those studies, the rover drove again on Dec. 17, traveling about 18 feet (5.6 meters) farther into Yellowknife Bay. That brings the mission's total driving distance to 0.42 mile (677 meters) since Curiosity's landing.

One additional drive is planned this week before the rover team gets a holiday break. Curiosity will continue studying the Martian environment from its holiday location at the end point of that drive within Yellowknife Bay. The mission's plans for most of 2013 center on driving toward the primary science destination, a 3-mile-high (5-kilometer) layered mound called Mount Sharp.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity during a two-year prime mission to assess whether areas inside Gale Crater ever offered a habitable environment for microbes. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1405
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 12/22/2012 02:56 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (Dec. 21, 2012): Curiosity's Martian Holiday

Published on Dec 21, 2012
Curiosity will spend the holidays at a location on Mars dubbed "Grandma's House."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpeK_V5JLCk
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 12/22/2012 02:43 PM
Great video update.

Take away: Discovery driven planning.

Merry Christmas to the Curiosity team.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 12/25/2012 02:01 AM

I have a simple, non-technical question, but it is hard to put it into words.

Remember when MER-B (Opportunity) landed in Eagle Crater?  Remember how excited planetary geologists were by the apparent stratigraphy in the crater's rim?

Where is the excitement now?  There are some simply incredible rocks showing up in the images from Glenelg (unmannedspaceflight.com has some of the best).  If you have not seen these, please take a look; they are stunning.  Are geologist jumping up and down, but we simply do not know about it?  I know I would be dancing in the aisles.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 12/26/2012 12:21 AM

I have a simple, non-technical question, but it is hard to put it into words.

Remember when MER-B (Opportunity) landed in Eagle Crater?  Remember how excited planetary geologists were by the apparent stratigraphy in the crater's rim?

Where is the excitement now?  There are some simply incredible rocks showing up in the images from Glenelg (unmannedspaceflight.com has some of the best).  If you have not seen these, please take a look; they are stunning.  Are geologist jumping up and down, but we simply do not know about it?  I know I would be dancing in the aisles.



Conglomerates on Mars?  Vesicular basalts on Mars? Trachytes on Mars?  More beautiful sandstones?  We certainly are jumping up and down! :D
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 12/26/2012 03:51 AM

I have a simple, non-technical question, but it is hard to put it into words.

Remember when MER-B (Opportunity) landed in Eagle Crater?  Remember how excited planetary geologists were by the apparent stratigraphy in the crater's rim?

Where is the excitement now?  There are some simply incredible rocks showing up in the images from Glenelg (unmannedspaceflight.com has some of the best).  If you have not seen these, please take a look; they are stunning.  Are geologist jumping up and down, but we simply do not know about it?  I know I would be dancing in the aisles.



Conglomerates on Mars?  Vesicular basalts on Mars? Trachytes on Mars?  More beautiful sandstones?  We certainly are jumping up and down! :D

It is images like this that are getting me up pretty excited:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00135/mcam/0135ML0823000000E1_DXXX.jpg
Care to speculate on the white material?  Do we dare hope that it is a carbonate?

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 12/26/2012 07:18 AM
It is images like this that are getting me up pretty excited:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00135/mcam/0135ML0823000000E1_DXXX.jpg
Care to speculate on the white material?  Do we dare hope that it is a carbonate?


It looks like some kind of surface crust, so more probably a sulphate or halite, but we can't rule out carbonate.  There are also a lot veins in some areas with translucent white material which could be either sulphate or carbonate.  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0132MH0163000000R0_DXXX&s=132
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 12/26/2012 11:18 AM
First part of the Year In Review features.

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2012/12/yir2012-mars-exploration-dominates-year-redefinition/

By Chris Gebhardt.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 12/28/2012 12:29 AM
12.27.2012

NASA Encourages Public To Explore Its Curiosity With New Rover-Themed Badge On Foursquare

WASHINGTON -- NASA and the mobile application Foursquare have teamed up to help the public unlock its scientific curiosity with a new rover-themed Curiosity Explorer badge.
Users of the Foursquare social media platform can earn the badge by following NASA and checking in at a NASA visitor center or venue categorized as a science museum or planetarium. Upon earning the badge, users will see a special message on Foursquare:

"Get out your rock-vaporizing laser! You've explored your scientific curiosities just like NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars. Stay curious and keep exploring. You never know what you'll find."

The launch of the badge follows the October check-in on Mars by NASA's Curiosity rover, which marked the first check-in on another planet. Foursquare users can keep up with Curiosity as the rover checks in at key locations and posts photos and tips, all while exploring the Red Planet.

After landing in Gale Crater in August, Curiosity began a 23-month mission that includes some of Mars' most intriguing science destinations. The mission's main science destination will be Mount Sharp, a mountain about 3 miles (5 kilometers) tall. First, Curiosity is investigating targets on flatter ground near the mountain, seeking clues in the rocks and soil that would indicate whether Mars ever was capable of supporting microbial life. It also is taking pictures of the trip, beaming them back to Earth for all to share.

NASA has been on Foursquare since 2010 through a strategic partnership with the platform. This partnership, launched with astronaut Doug Wheelock's first-ever check-in from the International Space Station, has allowed users to connect with NASA, and enabled them to explore the universe and rediscover Earth.

The partnership launched the now-expired NASA Explorer badge for Foursquare users, which encouraged them to explore NASA-related locations across the country. It also included the launch of a NASA Foursquare page, where the agency continues to provide official tips and information about the nation's space program.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) manages the Mars Science Laboratory mission and its Curiosity rover for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The rover was designed, developed and assembled at JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif.

To follow the Mars Curiosity rover and NASA on Foursquare, visit: http://www.foursquare.com/MarsCuriosity and http://www.foursquare.com/NASA


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1406
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 12/28/2012 08:52 AM
It is images like this that are getting me up pretty excited:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/msss/00135/mcam/0135ML0823000000E1_DXXX.jpg
Care to speculate on the white material?  Do we dare hope that it is a carbonate?


It looks like some kind of surface crust, so more probably a sulphate or halite, but we can't rule out carbonate.  There are also a lot veins in some areas with translucent white material which could be either sulphate or carbonate.  http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/?rawid=0132MH0163000000R0_DXXX&s=132


There is good data for the evaporites here on earth. First the less soluable sulfates of calcium and magnesium precipitate, followed by the halides of magnesium and calcium. If the water evaporates 100% the halides of sodium and potassium.

On Mars the situation could be more similar to Atacama desert. There the salt is mostl deposited from the atmosphere and it is dominated by nitrates. Mars might have larger deposits of perchlorates instead of the nitrates. A layer of a few centimeters of perchlorates might have larger implications on the timescale when the last time water was present.

A chemcam LIBS spectrum will show what it is. The Chemmin (Salt crystalls give good signals in the x-ray.) might even the better alternative, but they will be afraid that the salt crust liquifies in the rover and kills the instrument.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 12/28/2012 05:30 PM
I grumpily wish that PR-only updates would go into a PR-only thread.

PR campaigns are important, but they are not really updates, since nothing new really happened (on Mars).    grump grump grump.   "Rover checks into four-square" my foot wth is the world coming to.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 12/29/2012 12:50 AM
I grumpily wish that PR-only updates would go into a PR-only thread.

PR campaigns are important, but they are not really updates, since nothing new really happened (on Mars).    grump grump grump.   "Rover checks into four-square" my foot wth is the world coming to.

I will only post updates from the MSL main page (unless something extraordinary is posted in some accredited webpage).

I honestly don't consider foursquare that important, but I'm thinking of the greater audience out there.

My main goal is the promotion of & interest in space for the greater population. I found this site in my net searches - hopefully others will too.

Anyhow...it's been a great year for MSL and the teams, and so very much looking forward to the new discoveries in 2013.

FORWARD!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 12/29/2012 04:53 AM
There is good data for the evaporites here on earth. First the less soluable sulfates of calcium and magnesium precipitate, followed by the halides of magnesium and calcium. If the water evaporates 100% the halides of sodium and potassium.

Generally yes, however a lot depends on both starting composition and the evolutionary pathway the bines follow.

Quote
On Mars the situation could be more similar to Atacama desert. There the salt is mostl deposited from the atmosphere and it is dominated by nitrates. Mars might have larger deposits of perchlorates instead of the nitrates. A layer of a few centimeters of perchlorates might have larger implications on the timescale when the last time water was present.

The salts of the Atacama have complex sources.  The nitrates are atmospheric in origin, while the iodates are from marine salts.  The most common salts are halite, gypsum, anhydrite, thenerdite, and calcite, these come from a combination of runoff, dust deposition, and groundwater discharge.

Quote
A chemcam LIBS spectrum will show what it is. The Chemmin (Salt crystalls give good signals in the x-ray.) might even the better alternative, but they will be afraid that the salt crust liquifies in the rover and kills the instrument.

Indeed, but only XRD will determine the mineral, as sometimes different minerals will have the same chemical composition.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 12/29/2012 04:59 AM
I grumpily wish that PR-only updates would go into a PR-only thread.

PR campaigns are important, but they are not really updates, since nothing new really happened (on Mars).    grump grump grump.   "Rover checks into four-square" my foot wth is the world coming to.

I will only post updates from the MSL main page (unless something extraordinary is posted in some accredited webpage).

I honestly don't consider foursquare that important, but I'm thinking of the greater audience out there.

My main goal is the promotion of & interest in space for the greater population. I found this site in my net searches - hopefully others will too.

Anyhow...it's been a great year for MSL and the teams, and so very much looking forward to the new discoveries in 2013.

FORWARD!

I'll live...  and thanks for posting them...   MSL is one exciting mission.  I'm  in total awe of the analysis capability it has, such a large step forward when compared with MERs.  I'm crossing my fingers that it endures.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 12/31/2012 01:32 PM
Remember also that it uses an RTU for power rather than solar so is not susceptible to power loss from dust on the panels, unlike MER.
Actually, getting dust on the RTG radiator does significantly lower its efficiency.

Also if there is substantial dust on the lander then eventually the wind eddies could blow it into undesirable places compared to what you would accumulate over several years with the MERs.

The prime example was dust disabling the MER-B Mini-TES.  At least MALHI has a dust cover but ChemCAM does not.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 01/01/2013 05:00 AM
Curiosity's New Year Greeting for Times Square

Published on Dec 31, 2012
JPLNews

New Year's Eve revelers watching giant screens in New York's Times Square saw a special Happy New Year greeting from Mars, which was 206 million miles away as of Dec. 31, 2012. The video is silent and formatted to fit the Times Square screens.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pk7J68MhOoQ
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 01/04/2013 11:54 PM
01.04.2013

Curiosity Rover Explores 'Yellowknife Bay'


PASADENA, Calif. - After imaging during the holidays, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity resumed driving Jan. 3 and pulled within arm's reach of a sinuous rock feature called "Snake River."
Snake River is a thin curving line of darker rock cutting through flatter rocks and jutting above sand. Curiosity's science team plans to get a closer look at it before proceeding to other nearby rocks.

"It's one piece of the puzzle," said the mission's project scientist, John Grotzinger of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "It has a crosscutting relationship to the surrounding rock and appears to have formed after the deposition of the layer that it transects."

The drive during the mission's 147th Martian day, or sol, on the Red Planet took Curiosity about 10 feet (3 meters) northwestward and brought the mission's total driving distance to 2,303 feet (702 meters). The rover is within a shallow depression called "Yellowknife Bay," which is a flatter and lighter-toned type of terrain from what the mission crossed during its first four months inside Gale Crater.

During a holiday break for the rover team, Curiosity stayed at a location within Yellowknife Bay from which the rover took images of its surroundings. The team is evaluating possible first targets for use of Curiosity's hammering drill in coming weeks. The drill will collect powdered samples from the interior of rocks for analysis by instruments inside the rover.

"We had no surprises over the holidays," said the mission's project manager, Richard Cook of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena. "Now, Curiosity is back on the move. The area the rover is in looks good for our first drilling target."

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to assess whether areas inside Gale Crater ever offered a habitable environment for microbes. JPL, a division of Caltech, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1407
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 01/05/2013 04:48 AM
Curiosity rover studies rocks and a 'flower' on Mars

By By Alan Boyle,

MSNBChttp://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/01/03/16329185-curiosity-rover-studies-rocks-and-a-flower-on-mars?lite


Quote
I initially suspected that the flower was a tiny shred of plastic from the rover itself. Such a shred popped up in October. At that time, experts at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory surmised that the plastic may have been a bit of wrapping that was knocked loose from the Mars Science Laboratory's descent stage during the spacecraft's August landing. The plastic was thought to have fallen on top of the rover, and then dropped to the ground weeks later.

That's what led me to go with the plastic-scrap hypothesis. However, some of the folks commenting on the pictures noted that the object seemed to be embedded in the rock — which would argue against my hypothesis. So I put in an inquiry with Guy Webster, who serves as JPL's main spokesman for NASA's Mars missions.

A couple of hours later, Webster emailed me the verdict: "That appears to be part of the rock, not debris from the spacecraft."

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 01/05/2013 01:56 PM
Reminds me of a gysum flower.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: wjbarnett on 01/05/2013 04:21 PM
Reminds me of a gysum flower.
That's exactly what I was thinking too!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: aero on 01/05/2013 04:51 PM
Some pictures of Gypsum flowers.

https://www.google.com/search?q=gypsum+flower&hl=en&tbo=u&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1mXoUO6pD9OQqwGar4FY&sqi=2&ved=0CDIQsAQ&biw=1536&bih=708 (https://www.google.com/search?q=gypsum+flower&hl=en&tbo=u&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=1mXoUO6pD9OQqwGar4FY&sqi=2&ved=0CDIQsAQ&biw=1536&bih=708)

for comparison.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 01/08/2013 12:50 AM
NASA's Big Mars Rover Makes First Use of its Brush

Image advisory: 2013-009                                                                     Jan. 7, 2013

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-009&cid=release_2013-009

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has completed first-time use of a brush it carries to sweep dust off rocks.

Nearing the end of a series of first-time uses of the rover's tools, the mission has cleared dust away from a targeted patch on a flat Martian rock using the Dust Removal Tool.

The tool is a motorized, wire-bristle brush designed to prepare selected rock surfaces for enhanced inspection by the rover's science instruments. It is built into the turret at the end of the rover's arm. In particular, the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer and the Mars Hand Lens Imager, which share the turret with the brush and the rover's hammering drill, can gain information after dust removal that would not be accessible from a dust-blanketed rock.

Choosing an appropriate target was crucial for the first-time use of the Dust Removal Tool. The chosen target, called "Ekwir_1," is on a rock in the "Yellowknife Bay" area of Mars' Gale Crater. The rover team is also evaluating rocks in that area as potential targets for first use of the rover's hammering drill in coming weeks.

Images of the brushed area on Ekwir are online at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16565 and http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16566 .

"We wanted to be sure we had an optimal target for the first use," said Diana Trujillo of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., the mission's activity lead for the Dust Removal Tool. "We need to place the instrument within less than half an inch of the target without putting the hardware at risk. We needed a flat target, one that wasn't rough, one that was covered with dust. The results certainly look good."

Honeybee Robotics, New York, N.Y., built the Dust Removal Tool for Curiosity, as well as tools for two previous Mars rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, which included wire brushes plus rock-grinding mechanisms.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory project is using Curiosity to investigate whether the study area within Gale Crater has offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory mission for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. For more information about the mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

Follow the mission on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: kevin-rf on 01/08/2013 01:07 AM
Mental note, read caption before looking at picture, I thought I was looking at a dinosaur egg...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 01/10/2013 04:34 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (Jan. 10, 2013): Giving Mars the Brush-off

Published on Jan 10, 2013
JPLNews
NASA's Curiosity rover dusts off a rock on Mars for the first time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVE1LaV5iMI
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 01/14/2013 06:57 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY: M13-016

NASA HOSTS JAN. 15 TELECONFERENCE ON CURIOSITY ROVER PROGRESS

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 10 a.m.
PST (1 p.m. EST) Tuesday, Jan. 15, to provide an update about the
Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater.

The Mars Science Laboratory Project and its Curiosity rover are five
months into a two-year prime mission to investigate whether
conditions may have been favorable for microbial life.

For teleconference dial-in information, reporters must send their
name, media affiliation and telephone number to Elena Mejia at
elena.mejia@jpl.nasa.gov or call NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Media Relations Office at 818-354-5011.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

and

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl

Visuals will be available at the start of the event at:

http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

and

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl

   
-end-
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 01/15/2013 06:16 PM
RELEASE: 13-022

NASA MARS ROVER PREPARING TO DRILL INTO FIRST MARTIAN ROCK

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity is driving toward a
flat rock with pale veins that may hold clues to a wet history on the
Red Planet. If the rock meets rover engineers' approval when
Curiosity rolls up to it in coming days, it will become the first to
be drilled for a sample during the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

The size of a car, Curiosity is inside Mars' Gale Crater investigating
whether the planet ever offered an environment favorable for
microbial life. Curiosity landed in the crater five months ago to
begin its two-year prime mission.

"Drilling into a rock to collect a sample will be this mission's most
challenging activity since the landing. It has never been done on
Mars," said Mars Science Laboratory project manager Richard Cook of
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. "The drill
hardware interacts energetically with Martian material we don't
control. We won't be surprised if some steps in the process don't go
exactly as planned the first time through."

Curiosity first will gather powdered samples from inside the rock and
use those to scrub the drill. Then the rover will drill and ingest
more samples from this rock, which it will analyze for information
about its mineral and chemical composition.

The chosen rock is in an area where Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam)
and other cameras have revealed diverse unexpected features,
including veins, nodules, cross-bedded layering, a lustrous pebble
embedded in sandstone, and possibly some holes in the ground.
The rock chosen for drilling is called "John Klein" in tribute to
former Mars Science Laboratory deputy project manager John W. Klein,
who died in 2011.

"John's leadership skill played a crucial role in making Curiosity a
reality," said Cook.

The target is on flat-lying bedrock within a shallow depression called
"Yellowknife Bay." The terrain in this area differs from that of the
landing site, a dry streambed about a third of a mile (about 500
meters) to the west. Curiosity's science team decided to look there
for a first drilling target because orbital observations showed
fractured ground that cools more slowly each night than nearby
terrain types do.

"The orbital signal drew us here, but what we found when we arrived
has been a great surprise," said Mars Science Laboratory project
scientist John Grotzinger, of the California Institute of Technology
in Pasadena. "This area had a different type of wet environment than
the streambed where we landed, maybe a few different types of wet
environments."

One line of evidence comes from inspection of light-toned veins with
Curiosity's laser-pulsing Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument,
which found elevated levels of calcium, sulfur and hydrogen.

"These veins are likely composed of hydrated calcium sulfate, such as
bassinite or gypsum," said ChemCam team member Nicolas Mangold of the
Laboratoire de Planetologie et Geodynamique de Nantes in France. "On
Earth, forming veins like these requires water circulating in
fractures."

Researchers have used the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) to
examine sedimentary rocks in the area. Some are sandstone, with
grains up to about peppercorn size. One grain has an interesting
gleam and bud-like shape that have brought it Internet buzz as a
"Martian flower." Other rocks nearby are siltstone, with grains finer
than powdered sugar. These differ significantly from pebbly
conglomerate rocks in the landing area.

"All of these are sedimentary rocks, telling us Mars had environments
actively depositing material here," said MAHLI deputy principal
investigator Aileen Yingst of the Planetary Science Institute in
Tucson, Ariz. "The different grain sizes tell us about different
transport conditions."

JPL manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science
Mission Directorate in Washington.
To see an image of the rock, visit:

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16567

For more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity


and


http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 01/16/2013 12:39 AM
Mars Rover Curiosity's Team to Receive Space Foundation Award

01.15.13

PASADENA, Calif. -- The NASA mission that had the nation holding its breath as it tested an ingenious but never-before-used landing technique, and continues to amaze with new discoveries about Mars has been selected as the 2013 recipient of the Space Foundation's John L. "Jack" Swigert, Jr., Award for Space Exploration.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory project is using the rover Curiosity to investigate whether the study area within Gale Crater has offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

"We are recognizing the NASA Mars Science Laboratory mission team for its aggressive and technologically advanced exploration of another planet," said Space Foundation Chief Executive Officer Elliot Pulham. "This incredible mission will yield valuable science about conditions on Mars and enable critical technologies for future missions."

The award is given annually to the person or organization that has made the most significant accomplishment in advancing the exploration of space during the previous year. It will be presented April 8 during the opening ceremony of the 29th National Space Symposium at The Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs, Colo.

The John L. "Jack" Swigert, Jr., Award for Space Exploration honors NASA Apollo astronaut Jack Swigert. The Space Foundation, founded in 1983 in part to honor Swigert's memory, created the Swigert Award in 2004 in tribute to his lasting legacy of space exploration. Previous recipients include NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander Team, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, the California Institute of Technology, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover team from JPL, President George W. Bush, the LCROSS mission and, in 2012, NASA's Kepler Mission.

JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. For more information about the mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl . More information about the Swigert Award is online at:

http://www.spacefoundation.org/media/press-releases/space-foundation-honors-nasa-mars-science-laboratory-mission-team-john-l-jack .
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 01/18/2013 06:09 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (Jan. 18, 2013):
Curiosity Finds Calcium-Rich Deposits

Published on Jan 18, 2013
NASA's Curiosity rover finds calcium deposits on Mars similar to those seen on Earth when water circulates in cracks and rock fractures.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5pnfpRiwi8

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 01/18/2013 07:07 PM
Keep those reports coming Catdir.  They are excellent.  Putting the still images together to simulate motion is a great idea.  I noticed that there are not round pebbles like you'd find in a creek bed here.  Some of the rocks in the images did have slightly rounded corners.  No skipping stones tho.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 01/18/2013 08:40 PM
The last telecon has a lot more detail http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/28512078

This weeks planetary society hangout with Emily Lakdawalla and MSL team member Dr. Joel Hurowitz is also good http://www.planetary.org/blogs/casey-dreier/2013/20130117-planetary-society-hangout-curiosity-drilling.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 01/19/2013 02:19 AM
01.18.2013

Ms. Curiosity Goes to Washington

PASADENA, Calif. - It's an all-American, once-every-four-years tradition: the inauguration of a president. On Monday, Jan. 21, the Red Planet will join the traditional red-white-and-blue pageantry when a life-size model of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity appears in the inaugural parade after President Barack Obama takes the oath of office.
The rover model will be accompanied by four members of the team from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that safely landed Curiosity on the Martian surface last August. The four JPLers representing Curiosity and the Mars Science Laboratory, the spacecraft that transported the rover to the Red Planet, are:

Richard Cook-project manager
Jennifer Trosper-mission manager
Allen Chen--Flight Dynamics and Operations Lead for the entry, descent, and landing team
Bobak Ferdowsi-flight director
In addition to the JPL team, current and former NASA astronauts will appear in the parade, along with a model of Orion, the multi-purpose capsule that will take astronauts farther into space than ever before.

A full schedule of NASA-related events for Inauguration Day and the weekend leading up to it is online at: http://www.nasa.gov/news/inauguration.html .



http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1412
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 01/20/2013 03:51 AM
NASA Preps for Inaugural Parade

Published on Jan 19, 2013
Video of preparations at the Joint Base Anacostia Bolling in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 19 for the two NASA floats scheduled to appear in Monday's Presidential Inaugural Parade. The floats will feature full-scale models of NASA's Orion, the multi-purpose capsule that will take our astronauts farther into space than ever, and the Curiosity rover now on Mars.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6o7s-fVykfs
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 01/25/2013 02:21 AM
01.24.2013
Mars Rover Curiosity Uses Arm Camera At Night

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has for the first time used the camera on its arm to take photos at night, illuminated by white lights and ultraviolet lights on the instrument.
Scientists used the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) instrument for a close-up nighttime look at a rock target called "Sayunei," in an area where Curiosity's front-left wheel had scuffed the rock to provide fresh, dust-free materials to examine. The site is near where the rover team plans to begin using Curiosity to drill into a rock in coming weeks. The images of the rock Sayunei and of MAHLI's calibration target were taken on Jan. 22 (PST) and received on Earth Jan. 23.

The MAHLI, an adjustable-focus color camera, includes its own LED (light-emitting diode) illumination sources. Images of Sayunei taken with white-LED illumination and with illumination by ultraviolet LEDs are available online at:
PIA16711 and
PIA16712 .

"The purpose of acquiring observations under ultraviolet illumination was to look for fluorescent minerals," said MAHLI Principal Investigator Ken Edgett of Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. "These data just arrived this morning. The science team is still assessing the observations. If something looked green, yellow, orange or red under the ultraviolet illumination, that'd be a more clear-cut indicator of fluorescence."

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1416
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 01/28/2013 11:31 PM
01.28.2013

Curiosity Maneuver Prepares for Drilling

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has placed its drill onto a series of four locations on a Martian rock and pressed down on it with the rover's arm, in preparation for using the drill in coming days.
The rover carried out this "pre-load" testing on Mars yesterday (Jan. 27). The tests enable engineers to check whether the amount of force applied to the hardware matches predictions for what would result from the commanded motions.

The next step is an overnight pre-load test, to gain assurance that the large temperature change from day to night at the rover's location does not add excessively to stress on the arm while it is pressing on the drill. At Curiosity's work site in Gale Crater, air temperature plunges from about 32 degrees Fahrenheit (zero degrees Celsius) in the afternoon to minus 85 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 65 degrees Celsius) overnight. Over this temperature swing, this large rover's arm, chassis and mobility system grow and shrink by about a tenth of an inch (about 2.4 millimeters), a little more than the thickness of a U.S. quarter-dollar coin.

The rover team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., sent the rover commands yesterday to begin the overnight pre-load test today (Monday).

"We don't plan on leaving the drill in a rock overnight once we start drilling, but in case that happens, it is important to know what to expect in terms of stress on the hardware," said JPL's Daniel Limonadi, the lead systems engineer for Curiosity's surface sampling and science system. "This test is done at lower pre-load values than we plan to use during drilling, to let us learn about the temperature effects without putting the hardware at risk."

Remaining preparatory steps will take at least the rest of this week. Some of these steps are hardware checks. Others will evaluate characteristics of the rock material at the selected drilling site on a patch of flat, veined rock called "John Klein."

Limonadi said, "We are proceeding with caution in the approach to Curiosity's first drilling. This is challenging. It will be the first time any robot has drilled into a rock to collect a sample on Mars."

An activity called the "drill-on-rock checkout" will use the hammering action of Curiosity's drill briefly, without rotation of the drill bit, for assurance that the back-and-forth percussion mechanism and associated control system are properly tuned for hitting a rock.

A subsequent activity called "mini-drill" is designed to produce a small ring of tailings -- powder resulting from drilling -- on the surface of the rock while penetrating less than eight-tenths of an inch (2 centimeters). This activity will not go deep enough to push rock powder into the drill's sample-gathering chamber. Limonadi said, "The purpose is to see whether the tailings are behaving the way we expect. Do they look like dry powder? That's what we want to confirm."

The rover team's activities this week are affected by the difference between Mars time and Earth time. To compensate for this, the team develops commands based on rover activities from two sols earlier. So, for example, the mini-drill activity cannot occur sooner than two sols after the drill-on-rock checkout.

Each Martian sol lasts about 40 minutes longer than a 24-hour Earth day. By mid-February, the afternoon at Gale Crater, when Curiosity transmits information about results from the sol, will again be falling early enough in the California day for the rover team to plan each sol based on the previous sol's results.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to assess whether areas inside Gale Crater ever offered a habitable environment for microbes. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1419
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 02/05/2013 02:22 AM
02.04.2013
Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Weekend Test on Mars Was Preparation
 to Drill a Rock


PASADENA, Calif. - The bit of the rock-sampling drill on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity left its mark on a Martian rock this weekend during brief testing of the tool's percussive action.
The successful activity, called a "drill-on-rock checkout" by the rover team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, is part of a series of tests to prepare for the first drilling in history to collect a sample of rock material on Mars.

An image of the bit mark on the rock target called "John Klein" is available online at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16717 .

Another preparatory test, called "mini drill," will precede the full drilling. The mini drill test will use both the rotary and percussive actions of the drill to generate a ring of rock powder around a hole. This will allow for evaluation of the material to see if it behaves as a dry powder suitable for processing by the rover's sample handling mechanisms.

During a two-year prime mission, researchers are using Curiosity's 10 science instruments to assess whether the study area in Gale Crater on Mars ever has offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1421
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 02/08/2013 01:40 AM
02.07.2013

Preparatory Drill Test Performed on Mars

PASADENA, Calif. - The drill on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used both percussion and rotation to bore about 0.8 inch (2 centimeters) into a rock on Mars and generate cuttings for evaluation in advance of the rover's first sample-collection drilling.
Completion of this "mini drill" test in preparation for full drilling was confirmed in data from Mars received late Wednesday at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. If the drill cuttings on the ground around the fresh hole pass visual evaluation as suitable for processing by the rover's sample handling mechanisms, the rover team plans to proceed with commanding the first full drilling in coming days.

An image of the hole and surrounding cuttings produced by the mini drill test is online at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16760 . (see below)

The test was performed on a patch of flat, vein-bearing rock called "John Klein." The locations of earlier percussion-only testing and planned sample-collection drilling are also on John Klein. Pre-drilling observations of this rock yielded indications of one or more episodes of wet environmental conditions. The team plans to use Curiosity's laboratory instruments to analyze sample powder from inside the rock to learn more about the site's environmental history.

The planned full drilling will be the first rock drilling on Mars to collect a sample of material for analysis.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1422

and:

02.07.2013
Preparatory Test of Drilling on Mars Generates Rock Powder

In an activity called the "mini drill test," NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used its drill to generate this ring of powdered rock for inspection in advance of the rover's first full drilling. Curiosity performed the mini drill test and used its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera to record this image of the resulting hole and cuttings during the 180th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Feb. 6, 2013).

The hole is 0.63 inch (1.6 centimeters) in diameter and about 0.8 (2 centimeters) deep. The location is on a patch of flat rock called "John Klein." If the cuttings are judged to be suitable for processing by the rover's sample handling mechanisms, the mission's first full drilling is planned for a nearby spot on John Klein. The full drilling will be the first rock drilling on Mars to collect a sample of material for analysis.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
 
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=5068
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 02/09/2013 04:16 PM
RELEASE: 13-044

NASA CURIOSITY ROVER COLLECTS FIRST MARTIAN BEDROCK SAMPLE

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Curiosity rover has, for the first time,
used a drill carried at the end of its robotic arm to bore into a
flat, veiny rock on Mars and collect a sample from its interior. This
is the first time any robot has drilled into a rock to collect a
sample on Mars.

The fresh hole, about 0.63 inch (1.6 centimeters) wide and 2.5 inches
(6.4 centimeters) deep in a patch of fine-grained sedimentary
bedrock, can be seen in images and other data Curiosity beamed to
Earth Saturday. The rock is believed to hold evidence about long-gone
wet environments. In pursuit of that evidence, the rover will use its
laboratory instruments to analyze rock powder collected by the drill.


"The most advanced planetary robot ever designed now is a fully
operating analytical laboratory on Mars," said John Grunsfeld, NASA
associate administrator for the agency's Science Mission Directorate.
"This is the biggest milestone accomplishment for the Curiosity team
since the sky-crane landing last August, another proud day for
America."

For the next several days, ground controllers will command the rover's
arm to carry out a series of steps to process the sample, ultimately
delivering portions to the instruments inside.

"We commanded the first full-depth drilling, and we believe we have
collected sufficient material from the rock to meet our objectives of
hardware cleaning and sample drop-off," said Avi Okon, drill
cognizant engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL),
Pasadena.

Rock powder generated during drilling travels up flutes on the bit.
The bit assembly has chambers to hold the powder until it can be
transferred to the sample-handling mechanisms of the rover's
Collection and Handling for In-Situ Martian Rock Analysis (CHIMRA)
device.

Before the rock powder is analyzed, some will be used to scour traces
of material that may have been deposited onto the hardware while the
rover still was on Earth, despite thorough cleaning before launch.

"We'll take the powder we acquired and swish it around to scrub the
internal surfaces of the drill bit assembly," said JPL's Scott
McCloskey, drill systems engineer. "Then we'll use the arm to
transfer the powder out of the drill into the scoop, which will be
our first chance to see the acquired sample."

"Building a tool to interact forcefully with unpredictable rocks on
Mars required an ambitious development and testing program," said
JPL's Louise Jandura, chief engineer for Curiosity's sample
system."To get to the point of making this hole in a rock on Mars, we
made eight drills and bored more than 1,200 holes in 20 types of rock
on Earth."

Inside the sample-handling device, the powder will be vibrated once or
twice over a sieve that screens out any particles larger than
six-thousandths of an inch (150 microns) across. Small portions of
the sieved sample will fall through ports on the rover deck into the
Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument and the Sample Analysis
at Mars (SAM) instrument. These instruments then will begin the
much-anticipated detailed analysis.

The rock Curiosity drilled is called "John Klein" in memory of a Mars
Science Laboratory deputy project manager who died in 2011. Drilling
for a sample is the last new activity for NASA's Mars Science
Laboratory Project, which is using the car-size Curiosity rover to
investigate whether an area within Mars' Gale Crater has ever offered
an environment favorable for life.

JPL manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in
Washington.

For more about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

and

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 02/09/2013 05:56 PM
Quote
See that mysterious silver object in the picture above? That photograph was taken on the surface of Mars, and yet it sure doesn't look like a red rock. On January 30th, NASA's Curiosity rover snapped shots of the Martian landscape with each of its two MastCam cameras with this mystery object in the shot. NASA doesn't seem to have commented on the horn-like item yet, but theories currently include a meteorite that landed on the planet, or a piece of ore exposed by erosion of some sort.

http://www.theverge.com/2013/2/9/3969648/curiosity-rover-spots-strange-hunk-of-metal-on-mars
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 02/09/2013 10:41 PM
Looks just like a meteorite to me. Mars is littered with them. The MER rovers have found lots of them:
http://geology.com/articles/mars-meteorites/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 02/10/2013 01:10 AM
I love that before and after gif.

Must have been quite some vibration, you can see quite a few small pebbles were moved around.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: happyflower on 02/10/2013 07:01 AM
Quote
See that mysterious silver object in the picture above? That photograph was taken on the surface of Mars, and yet it sure doesn't look like a red rock. On January 30th, NASA's Curiosity rover snapped shots of the Martian landscape with each of its two MastCam cameras with this mystery object in the shot. NASA doesn't seem to have commented on the horn-like item yet, but theories currently include a meteorite that landed on the planet, or a piece of ore exposed by erosion of some sort.

http://www.theverge.com/2013/2/9/3969648/curiosity-rover-spots-strange-hunk-of-metal-on-mars

Wouldnt this little piece of metal or whatever it is be worth to go back and study? It just seems so different. Different is good for science isnt it?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 02/10/2013 07:29 AM
For a geologist the one stone which is not like all the others is bad choice. If you understand what it is and all the history you know nothing about the geology of the area you are in. So if you understood what the geological setting is you are in then you look for the strange stones.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 02/12/2013 01:08 AM
02.11.2013

Mars Rock Takes Unusual Form


On Mars, as on Earth, sometimes things can take on an unusual appearance. A case in point is a shiny-looking rock seen in a recent image from NASA's Curiosity Mars rover.
Some casual observers might see a resemblance to a car door handle, hood ornament or some other type of metallic object. To Ronald Sletten of the University of Washington, Seattle, a collaborator on Curiosity's science team, the object is an interesting study in how wind and the natural elements cause erosion and other effects on various types of rocks.

Find out what likely caused the shiny appearance of the Martian rock, and see some examples of similar phenomena found on Earth. A PDF of the images and explanatory text is available: http://1.usa.gov/WFuZRm

(also saved as PDF attachment below)

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1424
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 02/12/2013 01:26 PM
For a geologist the one stone which is not like all the others is bad choice.

That certainly is the case for geology.  What we really want to see is a knapped flint.  Oh well.

Geology is not all there is, and sometimes different is good There had to be an understandable process by which that "different" something got there.

The ventifact is somewhat depressing.  It means that that tenuous wind has been blowing for a long, long, time.  Is there a growing consensus that Mars is dead?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 02/17/2013 05:23 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (February 15, 2013): Curiosity Drills on Mars

Published on Feb 15, 2013
JPLNews
NASA's Curiosity drills for first sample from inside a rock on Mars

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoGGdEpso84
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 02/20/2013 04:08 PM
MEDIA ADVISORY: M13-034

NASA HOSTS TELECONFERENCE TODAY ABOUT CURIOSITY ROVER

WASHINGTON -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 3 p.m. EST
(noon PST) today, Feb. 20, to provide an update on the Mars rover
Curiosity mission. This morning, Curiosity engineers confirmed the
rover had collected the first-ever sample from inside a rock on Mars.


The Mars Science Laboratory project and its Curiosity rover are
investigating whether conditions on Mars ever have been favorable for
microbial life.

For teleconference dial-in information, reporters must send their
name, media affiliation and telephone number to Elena Mejia at
elena.mejia@jpl.nasa.gov or call NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Media Relations Office at 818-354-5011.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

and

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl

Visuals will be available at the start of the teleconference at:

http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

and

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 02/20/2013 08:41 PM
NASA Teleconference - Update on the Curiosity Rovers - February 20
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8085
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 02/20/2013 11:19 PM
RELEASE : 13-059
Feb. 20, 2013
 
NASA Mars Rover Confirms First Drilled Martian Rock Sample
 
 
PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has relayed new images that confirm it has successfully obtained the first sample ever collected from the interior of a rock on another planet. No rover has ever drilled into a rock beyond Earth and collected a sample from its interior.

Transfer of the powdered-rock sample into an open scoop was visible for the first time in images received Wednesday at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif.

"Seeing the powder from the drill in the scoop allows us to verify for the first time the drill collected a sample as it bore into the rock," said JPL's Scott McCloskey, drill systems engineer for Curiosity. "Many of us have been working toward this day for years. Getting final confirmation of successful drilling is incredibly gratifying. For the sampling team, this is the equivalent of the landing team going crazy after the successful touchdown."

The drill on Curiosity's robotic arm took in the powder as it bored a 2.5-inch (6.4-centimeter) hole into a target on flat Martian bedrock on Feb. 8. The rover team plans to have Curiosity sieve the sample and deliver portions of it to analytical instruments inside the rover.
The scoop now holding the precious sample is part of Curiosity's Collection and Handling for In-Situ Martian Rock Analysis (CHIMRA) device. During the next steps of processing, the powder will be enclosed inside CHIMRA and shaken once or twice over a sieve that screens out particles larger than 0.006 inch (150 microns) across.

Small portions of the sieved sample later will be delivered through inlet ports on top of the rover deck into the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument.

In response to information gained during testing at JPL, the processing and delivery plan has been adjusted to reduce use of mechanical vibration. The 150-micron screen in one of the two test versions of CHIMRA became partially detached after extensive use, although it remained usable. The team has added precautions for use of Curiosity's sampling system while continuing to study the cause and ramifications of the separation.

The sample comes from a fine-grained, veiny sedimentary rock called "John Klein," named in memory of a Mars Science Laboratory deputy project manager who died in 2011. The rock was selected for the first sample drilling because it may hold evidence of wet environmental conditions long ago. The rover's laboratory analysis of the powder may provide information about those conditions.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using the Curiosity rover with its 10 science instruments to investigate whether an area within Mars' Gale Crater ever has offered an environment favorable for microbial life. JPL manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

An image of the drill's rock powder held in the scoop is online at:

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16729


For more about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl


You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity


and


http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity

 
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 02/22/2013 09:47 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (Feb. 21, 2013): Curiosity Collects First Rock Sample on Mars

Published on Feb 21, 2013
Curiosity rover obtains the first sample ever collected from the interior of a rock on another planet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFfRhXxEeGk
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 02/26/2013 01:59 AM
Curiosity has now delivered the gray soil sample drilled from the rock into the CheMin and SAM instruments:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1430

There's a planetary science conference next month in Texas, will there be findings by then?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 03/01/2013 01:36 AM
Mars Curiosity switched over to its B side computer due to corrupted flash memory:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-078

Working on getting back to normal science ops in a few days.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/01/2013 04:02 PM
Mars Curiosity switched over to its B side computer due to corrupted flash memory:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-078

Working on getting back to normal science ops in a few days.
I can just image half of Curiosity's face drooping down (then letter coming back).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 03/04/2013 05:16 PM
Any chance this was caused by a stray Gamma Ray hit?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: AnalogMan on 03/04/2013 05:53 PM
Any chance this was caused by a stray Gamma Ray hit?

http://www.space.com/20034-mars-rover-curiosity-computer-glitch.html
March 1, 2013

The computer problem is related to a glitch in flash memory on the A-side computer caused by corrupted memory files, Cook said. Scientists are still looking into the root cause the corrupted memory, but it's possible the memory files were damaged by high-energy space particles called cosmic rays, which are always a danger beyond the protective atmosphere of Earth.

"The hardware that we fly is radiation tolerant," Cook told SPACE.com, "but there's a limit to how hardened it can be. You can still get high-energy particles that can cause the memory to be corrupted. It certainly is a possibility and that's what we're looking into."
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Robotbeat on 03/04/2013 08:34 PM
GCR still cause data corruption and flipped bits on Earth as well. Earth's protection is finite. That's part of the reason for ECC memory in servers. The problem is worse at high altitudes.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: notsorandom on 03/05/2013 12:44 AM
Curiosity Rover's Recovery on Track
PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has transitioned from precautionary "safe mode" to active status on the path of recovery from a memory glitch last week. Resumption of full operations is anticipated by next week.

http://go.nasa.gov/Vws8Lb
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 03/07/2013 09:47 PM

March 07, 2013
 
MEDIA ADVISORY : M13-045
 
 
NASA TV Briefing Discusses Curiosity Rover Analysis of Mars Rock
 
 
WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a news conference at 1 p.m. EDT, Tuesday, March 12, to discuss the Curiosity rover's analysis of the first sample of rock powder ever collected on Mars.

The briefing will be held in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters at 300 E St. SW in Washington. It will be broadcast live on NASA Television and streamed on the agency's website.

The participants will be:
-- Michael Meyer, lead scientist, Mars Exploration Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington
-- John Grotzinger, Curiosity project scientist, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.
-- David Blake, principal investigator for Curiosity's Chemistry and Mineralogy investigation, NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
-- Paul Mahaffy, principal investigator for Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars investigation, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Media representatives may ask questions from participating NASA centers or by telephone. To participate by phone, reporters must contact Dwayne Brown at 202-358-1726 or dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov by noon, March 12.

During a two-year prime mission, researchers are using Curiosity's 10 science instruments to assess whether the Gale Crater area on Mars ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

For NASA TV streaming video, scheduling and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv


The event will also be streamed live on Ustream at:

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl


More information about Curiosity is online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl


and
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/


Follow Curiosity on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

and

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity


 
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 03/08/2013 12:44 AM
It sounds then like they had analyzed the sample before it went into safe mode. Looking forward to a good run by ChemMin and SAM and some basic results.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 03/08/2013 02:19 AM
It was just a couple weeks ago they got the rock drilled and sampled.  Now they're calling a press conference from NASA HQ.  What did they find? 

I'm looking forward to Tuesday. 
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 03/08/2013 04:49 AM
It was just a couple weeks ago they got the rock drilled and sampled.  Now they're calling a press conference from NASA HQ.  What did they find? 

I'm looking forward to Tuesday. 

So am I.  It does not take long to do an XRD and XRF analysis of a sample (the terrestial version of ChemMin does it in less than an hour), and the results are generally straight forward to interpret.  It's not like the mass spectrometer...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 03/09/2013 09:00 PM
This is a press conference which was said to happen on a regular basis. This is the last one before the conjunction. Why do people expect anything?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/09/2013 09:42 PM
This is a press conference which was said to happen on a regular basis. This is the last one before the conjunction. Why do people expect anything?
With the safing and switch to B side, Curiosity also just suffered it's most significant anomaly to date. That would enough to warrant a press conference all by itself, although the presenters for this one tells us we'll get some science too.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 03/10/2013 04:32 AM
This is a press conference which was said to happen on a regular basis. This is the last one before the conjunction. Why do people expect anything?

Because the announcement said they would be discussing results.  I don't expect anything out of the ordinary.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 03/10/2013 08:51 AM
I don't expect anything out of the ordinary.

If you look what Craig at spaceref is talking about he gives the impression that NASA announced a historic discovery. This is what I hate with the journalists, making up a story based on nothing.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Eosterwine on 03/10/2013 04:16 PM
I don't expect anything out of the ordinary.

If you look what Craig at spaceref is talking about he gives the impression that NASA announced a historic discovery. This is what I hate with the journalists, making up a story based on nothing.



I completely disagree. 

Even the recent revelation that many of the rocks of Glenelg had been formed through multiple aqueous processes over different time spans only received the standard teleconference - I actually think that discovery is far more important a find than that which Opportunity made early in it's mission of flowing water on Mars, and that got the full NASA HQ treatment.  Why not wait and announce a press Q&A at the planetary science conference thats happening a few days later?

Dragging these scientists all the way across the country to NASA HQ in Washington seems a bit odd for something routine or "nothing".
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: stone on 03/10/2013 05:00 PM
Dragging these scientists all the way across the country to NASA HQ in Washington

It is only John Grotzinger, and David Blake. The others are from headquarters. Passadena would have meant travel for the other two.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: AJA on 03/10/2013 05:27 PM
Getting back to the engineering for a bit...

From http://go.nasa.gov/Vws8Lb

Quote
"...Also, we need to go through a series of steps with the B-side, such as informing the computer about the state of the rover -- the position of the arm, the position of the mast, that kind of information."

This is intriguing me. Obviously, there's no external means to determine the position of the arm etc. (I AM ruling out the possibility of reconstructing the positions from the pictures that were beamed back before the rover went into safe mode, and any potential for the orbiters to suddenly provide spy satellite quality images)

Now, given that there's no external means of position determination, the rover has to get this information from onboard instrumentation. If the B side is up and running, shouldn't it automatically read these parameters? I mean there's got to be a subroutine that does this, because the rover's semi-autonomous. Furthermore, when the rover goes into safe mode, doesn't it bring the arm and mast into a least risk position as it does (so the state would be pre-defined and known -- unless of course, this step didn't happen)?

Or do they imply that they've got to copy the relevant information from the A-side? Because that might be problematic...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 03/10/2013 06:37 PM
Safe mode would not move the arm
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 03/10/2013 08:06 PM
One of the most robust computers ever made didn't just drop dead.

I think there's something else to this.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/10/2013 08:23 PM
This is intriguing me. Obviously, there's no external means to determine the position of the arm etc. (I AM ruling out the possibility of reconstructing the positions from the pictures that were beamed back before the rover went into safe mode)
Why are you excluding this? Imaging is a pretty important part of monitoring and verifying the position of the arm.
Quote
Now, given that there's no external means of position determination, the rover has to get this information from onboard instrumentation. If the B side is up and running, shouldn't it automatically read these parameters?
My understanding (going from memory of stuff that was discussed when the arm was first commission) is that the arm obviously does have sensors that report the position of the various joints etc., but for really accurate positioning they need to be calibrated. This can't be done perfectly before flight, because of gravity, temperature and the loads it experience in launch and landing. If parameters for this were on the A side, they might need to be re-uplinked or re-created for the B side. This is mostly speculation, but the main point is that the arm is complicated, so it shouldn't really be surprising that re-initializing requires the ground in the loop.
Quote
Furthermore, when the rover goes into safe mode, doesn't it bring the arm and mast into a least risk position as it does
As Jim says, no chance of this. The first rule of safe mode is to do no harm. If something bad enough to trigger safe mode happens, the rover is not going to be moving the arm around.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/10/2013 08:25 PM
One of the most robust computers ever made didn't just drop dead.
Correct, it didn't drop dead. Based on the information we have, it experienced what appears to be an error in flash memory. This is not terribly unexpected.
Quote
I think there's something else to this.
Such as? It's hard to see the point of this sort of vague innuendo...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 03/10/2013 09:05 PM
I just don't get it.

How does a flash memory chip corrupt itself after only slight use?

Is radiation that damaging to these chips?

Sorry if my "vague innuendo" offends you hop. You've jumped all over me before. There no rule of the internet that says you should be nice but it certainly helps.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: AJA on 03/11/2013 04:05 AM
Why are you excluding this? Imaging is a pretty important part of monitoring and verifying the position of the arm.
You answered this yourself
Quote
... for really accurate positioning they need to be calibrated.

Moreover, the arm might have moved since the last self-shot was taken. And the conditions (temperature etc. - to account for any expansion/contraction) have almost certainly changed.

Quote
...This can't be done perfectly before flight, because of gravity, temperature and the loads it experience in launch and landing. If parameters for this were on the A side, they might need to be re-uplinked or re-created for the B side. This is mostly speculation, but the main point is that the arm is complicated, so it shouldn't really be surprising that re-initializing requires the ground in the loop.

My point is that Curiosity is the best source for all this data! Regardless of the variety, number, or scope of the parameters. It seems an awfully roundabout manner to have to read this data, send it to the ground, and then them run a calibration routine and send it back up.

Quote
The first rule of safe mode is to do no harm. If something bad enough to trigger safe mode happens, the rover is not going to be moving the arm around.
Yeah, my first instinct led me to assume that nothing would be touched, and everything would be left as you were; but then, the rover isn't limited to a binary state of activity. If you remember, one of the things they were checking for when they did that overnight stress test on the arm, having it pressed down against the rock surface, was to determine if  thermal contraction could cause red-line stresses on the arm, in case the rover it was to suffer a lock up while the drill-head inside rock.

I was just thinking that the protocols for safe-mode might be different depending on the exact problem faced, as well as what the rover was doing when it occurred. Sure, worst case scenario would be touch nothing - and save power and comms. But if she knows she's healthier than that worst case, MSL might decide to hunker down and try and safeguard the science instrumentation from unnecessary exposure.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 03/11/2013 12:14 PM
This is intriguing me. Obviously, there's no external means to determine the position of the arm etc. (I AM ruling out the possibility of reconstructing the positions from the pictures that were beamed back before the rover went into safe mode)
Why are you excluding this? Imaging is a pretty important part of monitoring and verifying the position of the arm.

He seems to be more excluding the reconstruction of the arm position from photographic history from the category "external" means to determine the position of the arm.  I took "external" to mean, say, Melvin the Martian taking pix of the arm as a verification.

Quote from: AJA
Furthermore, when the rover goes into safe mode, doesn't it bring the arm and mast into a least risk position as it does...

Quote from: Hop
As Jim says, no chance of this. The first rule of safe mode is to do no harm. If something bad enough to trigger safe mode happens, the rover is not going to be moving the arm around.

I was thinking along Aja's lines of thought here; that if the command to go into "safe mode" were to be issued, that the rover would retract stuff, like extended arms, so as to protect itself.  If a sandstorm should come up, the rover wouldn't leave its arm extended.

I just don't get it.

How does a flash memory chip corrupt itself after only slight use?

Is radiation that damaging to these chips?

They don't get it either, apparently.  So all of this calibration and what have you is a means of figuring out what went wrong.

Quote from: Aja
But if she knows she's healthier than that worst case, MSL might decide to hunker down and try and safeguard the science instrumentation from unnecessary exposure.

That's what I would have thought too.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/11/2013 07:46 PM
You answered this yourself
Quote
... for really accurate positioning they need to be calibrated.

Moreover, the arm might have moved since the last self-shot was taken. And the conditions (temperature etc. - to account for any expansion/contraction) have almost certainly changed.
1) Imaging is capable of giving very accurate position information. At the end of the arms reach, both mastcams have sub millimeter / pixel resolution.
2) They can take new images, once they get the cameras activated...
I have no idea if imaging is required for the current process or not, just saying that you shouldn't necessarily dismiss the idea out of hand.
Quote
My point is that Curiosity is the best source for all this data! Regardless of the variety, number, or scope of the parameters. It seems an awfully roundabout manner to have to read this data, send it to the ground, and then them run a calibration routine and send it back up.
My point was that regardless of you think it should work, it's a fact that the initial arm checkout and activation was a slow process with the ground in the loop. It is definitely not the case that they just sent a "calibrate the arm" command and everything was ready to go. Curiosity has the data, but humans have the brains. As I said before, I don't know if the current recovery process is analogous to the initial activation, but it really shouldn't be surprising that it requires the ground in the loop.

The "we have to tell the rover where the arm is" statement is almost certainly a simplification of a much more complicated engineering process.

It's normal for the process of coming bringing a complicated spacecraft out of safe mode and getting all the systems back up and running to take days or weeks. This is also the first safing of Curiosity on Mars, so they will be going slow and may run into unexpected hitches.
Quote
I was just thinking that the protocols for safe-mode might be different depending on the exact problem faced, as well as what the rover was doing when it occurred.
The point of safe mode is to stay alive and in communication until the ground can figure out the problem. Adding complexity to this raises obvious risks, especially when you are relying on a system that is malfunctioning to diagnose it's own malfunctions. You do *not* want to have a bug in your safe mode code put the vehicle in an unexpected state.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 03/12/2013 04:00 AM
They're able to store data in much of the flash memory on side A:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1437

Looking forward to tomorrow!  Press conference at 10 am Pacific/11 am Mountain.  I'll try to keep up as best I can.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 03/12/2013 04:01 PM
They're able to store data in much of the flash memory on side A:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1437

Looking forward to tomorrow!  Press conference at 10 am Pacific/11 am Mountain.  I'll try to keep up as best I can.

Press conference now underway.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Galactic Penguin SST on 03/12/2013 04:06 PM
Oooh Curiosity found clay minerals (phyllosillicates) at "Yellowknife Bay" (or more explicitly on the bed rock target known as "John Klein")! That almost certainly means the rock was in a fresh water environment a long time ago. Yummy yummy yummy......  8)

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16830.html (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16830.html)

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/news/msl20130312.html (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/news/msl20130312.html)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 03/12/2013 04:53 PM
CNN is reporting right now that NASA is holding a press conference on the analysis of the first powdered rock sample, and that "Mars may once have supported life".  What did I miss?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Danderman on 03/12/2013 05:16 PM
Did the analysis provide an isotope breakdown of the carbon that was found?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 03/12/2013 05:38 PM
NASA News Conference on Curiosity Rover Mars Rock Analysis - March 12
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8126
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 03/12/2013 06:06 PM
A fundamental question for this mission is whether Mars could have supported a habitable environment," said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA's Mars Exploration Program at the agency's headquarters in Washington. "From what we know now, the answer is yes."  (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/news/msl20130312.html)

Realizing that "could have" doesn't mean "did" at all, I ask:  On the basis of this one sample, is it safe to say, catagorically, that Mars "could have" supported a habitable environment, in certain areas?

Followup question:  Where would those "certain areas" be?

Closing question:  What is the next piece of data that would change "could have" to "did"?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/12/2013 06:38 PM
Did the analysis provide an isotope breakdown of the carbon that was found?
The only isotope ratio mentioned was deuterium/hydrogen, which was  lower than rocknest. They didn't really elaborate, but this is what you'd expect if the water was from a time before so much of the H had a chance to escape.

As usual, the entire press conference is available on JPLs ustream
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/29927128 and the JPL version of the press release links all the graphics
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 03/12/2013 07:45 PM
Getting back to the engineering for a bit...

From http://go.nasa.gov/Vws8Lb

Quote
"...Also, we need to go through a series of steps with the B-side, such as informing the computer about the state of the rover -- the position of the arm, the position of the mast, that kind of information."

This is intriguing me. Obviously, there's no external means to determine the position of the arm etc. (I AM ruling out the possibility of reconstructing the positions from the pictures that were beamed back before the rover went into safe mode, and any potential for the orbiters to suddenly provide spy satellite quality images)

Now, given that there's no external means of position determination, the rover has to get this information from onboard instrumentation. If the B side is up and running, shouldn't it automatically read these parameters? I mean there's got to be a subroutine that does this, because the rover's semi-autonomous. Furthermore, when the rover goes into safe mode, doesn't it bring the arm and mast into a least risk position as it does (so the state would be pre-defined and known -- unless of course, this step didn't happen)?

Or do they imply that they've got to copy the relevant information from the A-side? Because that might be problematic...

It sounds like they're going through a cautious, multi-step recovery process along the lines of:

1.) Figure out what's working
2.) Enable side B and transfer basic functions to it
3.) Test function of B side
4.) Load operational parameters (such as arm position)
5.) Test rover operation

They didn't say how they recover the operational parameters. Presumably their first option is to read them from the side B memory, but if they had a memory fault, they want to be sure the parameters are accurate. The next fallback is probably to use the last known parameters, which they almost certainly keep track of back on earth either by the rover reporting them back to earth as the means of confirming each instruction was completed properly, or by reconstructing them from instructions that were confirmed in a simpler manner. They might also verify position from the cameras.

They may or may not be able to read the position of the arm directly. Position is usually measured by electronic encoders (basic concept is usually counting very finely etched marks on a scale and adding them up), but most encoders do not read absolute position...the controller has to add up travel to determine position since they last synched to a known location like the MAHLI calibration target, so that position would be a stored value as I refer to above.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 03/13/2013 02:24 AM
Does this discovery make it more likely that Gale Crater will be the landing site for the next rover and/or Martian Sample Return mission?

Also: can the powder around the drill holes Curiosity's made so far be collected on a later sample return mission?  Are there any plans for that?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 03/13/2013 03:18 AM
Does this discovery make it more likely that Gale Crater will be the landing site for the next rover and/or Martian Sample Return mission?

Also: can the powder around the drill holes Curiosity's made so far be collected on a later sample return mission?  Are there any plans for that?

Put it this way, I don't think it does Gale Crater's chances any harm!  It was already fairly high.

I suspect any MSR mission would collect new samples.  The power could have down away by then, or being contaminated.  Also researchers will prefer core to powder.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/13/2013 05:02 AM
Also: can the powder around the drill holes Curiosity's made so far be collected on a later sample return mission?  Are there any plans for that?
No. The samples are dumped in a compartment inside the rover which isn't accessible from the outside. You wouldn't want to return those anyway, since they would be all mixed up and have been heated  (for SAM samples) and possibly contaminated by MSL or the modern Mars environment anyway.

There was a sample cache in the plan at one point, but it was de-scoped. I believe Blackstar posted some informative stuff about that a while back in one of the MSL threads.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 03/13/2013 08:50 AM
Does this discovery make it more likely that Gale Crater will be the landing site for the next rover and/or Martian Sample Return mission?

Also: can the powder around the drill holes Curiosity's made so far be collected on a later sample return mission?  Are there any plans for that?

I would add does this make it more likely that this will be where the EXOMars rover will be sent as well?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 03/13/2013 10:58 PM
Does this discovery make it more likely that Gale Crater will be the landing site for the next rover and/or Martian Sample Return mission?

Also: can the powder around the drill holes Curiosity's made so far be collected on a later sample return mission?  Are there any plans for that?

I would add does this make it more likely that this will be where the EXOMars rover will be sent as well?

I think that would be overkill.  I imagine the ExoMars rover would go somewhere else interesting - Nilli Fossae perhaps.  That way we could have two well-dcomented sites to follow up with a sample return mission.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 03/14/2013 04:03 PM

Mawrth Vallis would be my preferred location...lots of different types of clays without too much roving.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 03/15/2013 10:21 PM
03.15.2013
Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Moon, Mars Science Conference Events to be Streamed

NASA's Mars Curiosity and lunar GRAIL missions, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., will be among those discussed during the 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Houston on March 18 to 22.
Science briefings for Curiosity and GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) will be streamed live by JPL on Ustream, as follows:

--Mars Curiosity: Monday, March 18, 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT), online at http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

--GRAIL and NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Tuesday, March 19, 10 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. EDT), online at: http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 .

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

The briefings, along with others from the conference, will also be streamed by the conference organizer, the Lunar and Planetary Institute of Houston, at: http://www.livestream.com/lpsc2013 . The institute is managed by the Universities Space Research Association, a national, nonprofit consortium of universities chartered at NASA's request in 1969 by the National Academy of Sciences.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1445
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 03/15/2013 10:40 PM
Image Advisory: 2013-097                                                                    March. 15, 2013

Panorama From NASA Mars Rover Shows Mount Sharp



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-097&cid=release_2013-097

PASADENA, Calif. -- Rising above the present location of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, higher than any mountain in the 48 contiguous states of the United States, Mount Sharp is featured in new imagery from the rover.

A pair of mosaics assembled from dozens of telephoto images shows Mount Sharp in dramatic detail. The component images were taken by the 100-millimeter-focal-length telephoto lens camera mounted on the right side of Curiosity's remote sensing mast, during the 45th Martian day of the rover's mission on Mars (Sept. 20, 2012).

This layered mound, also called Aeolis Mons, in the center of Gale Crater rises more than 3 miles (5 kilometers) above the crater floor location of Curiosity. Lower slopes of Mount Sharp remain a destination for the mission, though the rover will first spend many more weeks around a location called "Yellowknife Bay," where it has found evidence of a past environment favorable for microbial life.

A version of the mosaic that has been white-balanced to show the terrain as if under Earthlike lighting, which makes the sky look overly blue, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16768 . White-balanced versions help scientists recognize rock materials based on their terrestrial experience. The Martian sky would look like more of a butterscotch color to the human eye. A version of the mosaic with raw color, as a typical smart-phone camera would show the scene, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16769 .

In both versions, the sky has been filled out by extrapolating color and brightness information from the portions of the sky that were captured in images of the terrain.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory project is using Curiosity and the rover's 10 science instruments to investigate environmental history within Gale Crater, a location where the project has found that conditions were long ago favorable for microbial life.

Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the Mast Camera (Mastcam) instrument. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory mission for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington, and built the rover.

For more information about the mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

Follow the mission on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov


- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 03/18/2013 04:57 PM
News release: 2013-099                                                                    March. 18, 2013

Curiosity Mars Rover Sees Trend in Water Presence

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-099&cid=release_2013-099

THE WOODLANDS, Texas - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has seen evidence of water-bearing minerals in rocks near where it had already found clay minerals inside a drilled rock.

Last week, the rover's science team announced that analysis of powder from a drilled mudstone rock on Mars indicates past environmental conditions that were favorable for microbial life. Additional findings presented today (March 18) at a news briefing at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in The Woodlands, Texas, suggest those conditions extended beyond the site of the drilling.

Using infrared-imaging capability of a camera on the rover and an instrument that shoots neutrons into the ground to probe for hydrogen, researchers have found more hydration of minerals near the clay-bearing rock than at locations Curiosity visited earlier.

The rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam) can also serve as a mineral-detecting and hydration-detecting tool, reported Jim Bell of Arizona State University, Tempe. "Some iron-bearing rocks and minerals can be detected and mapped using the Mastcam's near-infrared filters."

Ratios of brightness in different Mastcam near-infrared wavelengths can indicate the presence of some hydrated minerals. The technique was used to check rocks in the "Yellowknife Bay" area where Curiosity's drill last month collected the first powder from the interior of a rock on Mars. Some rocks in Yellowknife Bay are crisscrossed with bright veins.

"With Mastcam, we see elevated hydration signals in the narrow veins that cut many of the rocks in this area," said Melissa Rice of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. "These bright veins contain hydrated minerals that are different from the clay minerals in the surrounding rock matrix."

The Russian-made Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument on Curiosity detects hydrogen beneath the rover. At the rover's very dry study area on Mars, the detected hydrogen is mainly in water molecules bound into minerals. "We definitely see signal variation along the traverse from the landing point to Yellowknife Bay," said DAN Deputy Principal Investigator Maxim Litvak of the Space Research Institute, Moscow. "More water is detected at Yellowknife Bay than earlier on the route. Even within Yellowknife Bay, we see significant variation."

Findings presented today from the Canadian-made Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on Curiosity's arm indicate that the wet environmental processes that produced clay at Yellowknife Bay did so without much change in the overall mix of chemical elements present. The elemental composition of the outcrop Curiosity drilled into matches the composition of basalt. For example, it has basalt-like proportions of silicon, aluminum, magnesium and iron. Basalt is the most common rock type on Mars. It is igneous, but it is also thought to be the parent material for sedimentary rocks Curiosity has examined.

"The elemental composition of rocks in Yellowknife Bay wasn't changed much by mineral alteration," said Curiosity science team member Mariek Schmidt of Brock University, Saint Catharines, Ontario, Canada.

A dust coating on rocks had made the composition detected by APXS not quite a match for basalt until Curiosity used a brush to sweep the dust away. After that, APXS saw less sulfur.

"By removing the dust, we've got a better reading that pushes the classification toward basaltic composition," Schmidt said. The sedimentary rocks at Yellowknife Bay likely formed when original basaltic rocks were broken into fragments, transported, re-deposited as sedimentary particles, and mineralogically altered by exposure to water.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to investigate whether an area within Mars' Gale Crater has ever offered an environment favorable for microbial life. Curiosity, carrying 10 science instruments, landed seven months ago to begin its two-year prime mission. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more about the mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/msl and http://www.nasa.gov/msl .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .


Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Star One on 03/18/2013 08:30 PM
Quote
A new glitch on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has forced the vehicle to stay in safe mode longer than planned, stalling science operations for another couple of days, scientists said today (March 18).

http://www.space.com/20273-curiosity-mars-rover-safe-mode.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/19/2013 12:42 AM
For anyone who missed the LPSC press briefing associated with the PR jacqmans posted above, you can watch it here:
http://www.livestream.com/lpsc2013/video?clipId=pla_5f897671-5a33-43d2-991f-d6b0e2a3a340

Or on the JPL ustream channel: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/30076916
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mlindner on 03/19/2013 06:04 AM
For anyone who missed the LPSC press briefing associated with the PR jacqmans posted above, you can watch it here:
http://www.livestream.com/lpsc2013/video?clipId=pla_5f897671-5a33-43d2-991f-d6b0e2a3a340

Or on the JPL ustream channel: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/30076916

Is there any version that isn't heavily blurred? It looks like they were using out of focus cameras. (Also it's not just the low resolution, as viewing the video at original resolution it is still blurry.)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 03/19/2013 07:52 AM

Mawrth Vallis would be my preferred location...lots of different types of clays without too much roving.

Could be good - I still have hopes for Nili Fossae and the possibility of methane seeps.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/20/2013 01:21 AM
Is there any version that isn't heavily blurred?
It might appear on NASA or JPLs youtube channel, but I don't imagine that would be much different. The visuals from that presentation are available at http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1446
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 03/22/2013 01:02 AM
03.20.2013

Sun in the Way Will Affect Mars Missions in April

PASADENA, Calif. - The positions of the planets next month will mean diminished communications between Earth and NASA's spacecraft at Mars.

Mars will be passing almost directly behind the sun, from Earth's perspective. The sun can easily disrupt radio transmissions between the two planets during that near-alignment. To prevent an impaired command from reaching an orbiter or rover, mission controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., are preparing to suspend sending any commands to spacecraft at Mars for weeks in April. Transmissions from Mars to Earth will also be reduced.

The travels of Earth and Mars around the sun set up this arrangement, called a Mars solar conjunction, about once every 26 months.

"This is our sixth conjunction for Odyssey," said Chris Potts of JPL, mission manager for NASA's Mars Odyssey, which has been orbiting Mars since 2001. "We have plenty of useful experience dealing with them, though each conjunction is a little different."

The Mars solar conjunctions that occur once about every 26 months are not identical to each other. They can differ in exactly how close to directly behind the sun Mars gets, and they can differ in how active the sun is. The sun's activity, in terms of sunspots and solar flares, varies on a 22-year cycle.

This year, the apparent angle between Mars and the sun (if you could see Mars against the glare of the sun--but don't try, because it's dangerous to the eyes) will slim to 0.4 degree on April 17. The sun is in a more active period of solar flares for its current cycle, compared to the 2011 conjunction, but this cycle has been relatively mild.

"The biggest difference for this 2013 conjunction is having Curiosity on Mars," Potts said. Odyssey and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter relay almost all data coming from Curiosity and the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, as well as conducting the orbiters' own science observations.

Transmissions from Earth to the orbiters will be suspended while Mars and the sun are two degrees or less apart in the sky, from April 9 to 26, with restricted commanding during additional days before and after. Both orbiters will continue science observations on a reduced basis compared to usual operations. Both will receive and record data from the rovers. Odyssey will continue transmissions Earthward throughout April, although engineers anticipate some data dropouts, and the recorded data will be retransmitted later.

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will go into a record-only mode on April 4. "For the entire conjunction period, we'll just be storing data on board," said Deputy Mission Manager Reid Thomas of JPL. He anticipates that the orbiter could have about 40 gigabits of data from its own science instruments and about 12 gigabits of data from Curiosity accumulated for sending to Earth around May 1.

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is approaching its fifth solar conjunction. Its team will send no commands between April 9 and April 26. The rover will continue science activities using a long-term set of commands to be sent beforehand.

"We are doing extra science planning work this month to develop almost three weeks of activity sequences for Opportunity to execute throughout conjunction," said Opportunity Mission Manager Alfonso Herrera of JPL. The activities during the conjunction period will not include any driving.

Curiosity, the newest asset on Mars, can also continue making science observations from the location where it will spend the conjunction period. Curiosity's controllers plan to suspend commanding from April 4 to May 1.

"We will maintain visibility of rover status two ways," said Torsten Zorn of JPL, conjunction planning leader for the mission's engineering operations team. "First, Curiosity will be sending daily beeps directly to Earth. Our second line of visibility is in the Odyssey relays."

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the projects operating both NASA Mars orbiters and both Mars rovers for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1449
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 03/23/2013 04:26 AM
New raw images are up for sol 215 and sol 221-222!  Good to see them back.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 03/25/2013 11:46 PM
03.25.2013

Curiosity Resumes Science Investigations

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has resumed science investigations after recovery from a computer glitch that prompted the engineers to switch the rover to a redundant main computer on Feb. 28.
The rover has been monitoring the weather since March 21 and delivered a new portion of powdered-rock sample for laboratory analysis on March 23, among other activities.

"We are back to full science operations," said Curiosity Deputy Project Manager Jim Erickson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

The powder delivered on Saturday came from the rover's first full drilling into a rock to collect a sample. The new portion went into the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument inside the rover, which began analyzing this material and had previously analyzed other portions from the same drilling. SAM can analyze samples in several different ways, so multiple portions from the same drilling are useful.

The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) is recording weather variables. The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is checking the natural radiation environment at the rover's location inside Gale Crater.

Like many spacecraft, Curiosity carries a pair of main computers, redundant to each other, to have a backup available if one fails. Each of the computers, A-side and B-side, also has other redundant subsystems linked to just that computer. Curiosity is now operating on its B-side, as it did during part of the flight from Earth to Mars. The A-side was most recently used starting a few weeks before landing and continuing until Feb. 28, when engineers commanded a switch to the B-side in response to a memory glitch on the A-side. The A-side now is available as a backup if needed.

One aspect of ramping-up activities after switching to the B-side computer has been to check the six engineering cameras that are hard-linked to that computer. The rover's science instruments, including five science cameras, can each be operated by either the A-side or B-side computer, whichever is active. However, each of Curiosity's 12 engineering cameras is linked to just one of the computers. The engineering cameras are the Navigation Camera (Navcam), the Front Hazard-Avoidance Camera (Front Hazcam) and Rear Hazard-Avoidance Camera (Rear Hazcam). Each of those three named cameras has four cameras on it: two stereo pairs of cameras, with one pair linked to each computer. Only the pairs linked to the active computer can be used, and the A-side computer was active from before landing, in August, until Feb. 28.

"This was the first use of the B-side engineering cameras since April 2012, on the way to Mars," said JPL's Justin Maki, team lead for these cameras. "Now we've used them on Mars for the first time, and they've all checked out OK."

Engineers quickly diagnosed a software issue that prompted Curiosity to put itself into a precautionary standby "safe mode" on March 16, and they know how to prevent it from happening again. The rover stayed on its B-side while it was in safe mode and subsequently as science activities resumed.

Upcoming activities include preparations for a moratorium on transmitting commands to Curiosity from April 4 to May 1, while Mars will be passing nearly directly behind the sun from Earth's perspective. The moratorium is a precaution against possible interference by the sun corrupting a command sent to the rover.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory project is using Curiosity and the rover's 10 science instruments to investigate the environmental history within Gale Crater, a location where the project has found that conditions were long ago favorable for microbial life. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.



http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1456
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mlindner on 03/26/2013 02:18 AM
Upcoming activities include preparations for a moratorium on transmitting commands to Curiosity from April 4 to May 1, while Mars will be passing nearly directly behind the sun from Earth's perspective. The moratorium is a precaution against possible interference by the sun corrupting a command sent to the rover.

I'm not sure of the reasoning for this. Their communication should be encrypted and checksummed. There should be no way a command should be able to be corrupted unless there was a hardware failure on the rover itself.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 03/26/2013 03:37 AM
I'm not sure of the reasoning for this. Their communication should be encrypted and checksummed. There should be no way a command should be able to be corrupted unless there was a hardware failure on the rover itself.
I think it's a very big simplification for general audiences.

Checksum would prevent the rover from trying to execute corrupted commands, but there would still impacts. What ever was supposed to be uplinked doesn't get there, and the rover has to do something else instead. That "something else" has to be planned and tested, so at some error rate it's more efficient to just make the "something else" plan A and not bother trying to uplink at all. Downlink is limited in conjunction too, so science activities would have to be limited anyway.

That said, I recall reading elsewhere that the main reason they don't command is actually that they don't want to try to recover from anomalies when com is limited and unpredictable.  If the rover is sitting doing something very simple, it's unlikely to run into problems. If you start a drive under ratty com, hit a problem and go into safe mode, you may not be able to get telemetry to diagnose or uplink to recover. Many failures can result in falling back to low gain antennas, which would further complicate things.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: MP99 on 03/26/2013 10:12 PM
Upcoming activities include preparations for a moratorium on transmitting commands to Curiosity from April 4 to May 1, while Mars will be passing nearly directly behind the sun from Earth's perspective. The moratorium is a precaution against possible interference by the sun corrupting a command sent to the rover.

I'm not sure of the reasoning for this. Their communication should be encrypted and checksummed. There should be no way a command should be able to be corrupted unless there was a hardware failure on the rover itself.

Quote
"In theory, there should be no difference between theory and practice, but in practice, there is." (William T. Harbaugh)

If communication will be difficult, regardless whether some might get through and be checksum'd OK, it seems safer to wait it out.

DSN is a valuable resource, so I suspect it's more worthwhile to use it for something else during the "blackout".

cheers, Martin
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mlindner on 03/27/2013 01:54 AM
Upcoming activities include preparations for a moratorium on transmitting commands to Curiosity from April 4 to May 1, while Mars will be passing nearly directly behind the sun from Earth's perspective. The moratorium is a precaution against possible interference by the sun corrupting a command sent to the rover.

I'm not sure of the reasoning for this. Their communication should be encrypted and checksummed. There should be no way a command should be able to be corrupted unless there was a hardware failure on the rover itself.

Quote
"In theory, there should be no difference between theory and practice, but in practice, there is." (William T. Harbaugh)

If communication will be difficult, regardless whether some might get through and be checksum'd OK, it seems safer to wait it out.

DSN is a valuable resource, so I suspect it's more worthwhile to use it for something else during the "blackout".

cheers, Martin

That quote applies more in the real world. Inside of a computer the system is designed to be idealistic, its the only way you can guarantee code runs. Once you get the bits in from the radio it's either it fails checksum or it succeeds (assuming it doesn't fail decryption). If it succeeds then you can be 100% certain (as long as you have computers voting to avoid radiation effects) that what you got is what was sent from Earth. (Disclaimer: I'm a (soon to be) embedded software engineer. I've written checksumming code for cubesat communications.)

But we're getting off topic. This is an update thread. So I'll stop talking about this any longer here.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 03/27/2013 12:02 PM
DSN is a valuable resource, so I suspect it's more worthwhile to use it for something else during the "blackout".

Have they scheduled the bandwidth for another use?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Targeteer on 03/31/2013 08:00 PM
The Science Channel (SCI) has a show titled "NASA Mission to Mars" that discusses Curiousity's mission.  It originally aired 19 Mar and re-aired today when I caught it on the schedule.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: fthurber on 04/01/2013 03:39 PM
I saw this last week and I was a little dismayed at how beat up the wheels were just from short roving here on earth.  There were dents and even holes in the wheels; this does not bode well for long term roving on Mars...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mlindner on 04/01/2013 04:05 PM
I saw this last week and I was a little dismayed at how beat up the wheels were just from short roving here on earth.  There were dents and even holes in the wheels; this does not bode well for long term roving on Mars...

1/3rd the gravity, 1/3rd the force.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: douglas100 on 04/02/2013 02:16 PM
I saw this last week and I was a little dismayed at how beat up the wheels were just from short roving here on earth.  There were dents and even holes in the wheels; this does not bode well for long term roving on Mars...

Don't worry about it. Opportunity's been going over nine years and its wheels are still turning.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 04/02/2013 07:40 PM
Don't worry about it. Opportunity's been going over nine years and its wheels are still turning.
MER wheels aren't really a useful comparison, they are a different design and not subject to the same loads. However, the team have repeatedly stated that dings, dents and even holes in the wheels are expected and not a sign of problems.

edit:
oops, writing "are" instead of "aren't" also isn't useful :(
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 04/04/2013 12:57 AM
News release: 2013-121                                                                    April. 3, 2013

Used Parachute on Mars Flaps in the Wind



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-121&cid=release_2013-121

PASADENA, Calif. - Photos from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show how the parachute that helped NASA's Curiosity rover land on Mars last summer has subsequently changed its shape on the ground.

The images were obtained by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Seven images taken by HiRISE between Aug. 12, 2012, and Jan. 13, 2013, show the used parachute shifting its shape at least twice in response to wind.

The images in the sequence of photos are available online at http://uahirise.org/releases/msl-chute.php and at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA16813 .

Researchers have used HiRISE to study many types of changes on Mars. Its first image of Curiosity's parachute, not included in this series, caught the spacecraft suspended from the chute during descent through the Martian atmosphere.

HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson. The instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project and Curiosity are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

For more information about the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which has been studying Mars from orbit since 2006, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mro .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov


- end -


>>>Click on picture below to start the motion <<<
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: iamlucky13 on 04/05/2013 12:23 AM
DSN is a valuable resource, so I suspect it's more worthwhile to use it for something else during the "blackout".

Have they scheduled the bandwidth for another use?

They seldom have trouble finding multiple tasks to keep the DSN antennas (3 sites, each with 4 or more antennas) quite busy. The real challenge is scheduling everything so everyone can get their data without interrupting each other.

Currently though, the big 70m dish at the Goldstone, California site, is offline have one of its main bearings serviced. I would not be surprised if the start of this major maintenance work was deliberately chosen to coincide with the Mars conjunction, since the spacecraft there account for a lot of the DSN bandwidth allocation.

http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/dsn/features/70metermaintenance.html

Quote
As with any large, rotating structure that has operated almost 24 hours per day, seven days per week for over 40 years, we eventually have to replace major elements," said Wayne Sible, the network's deputy project manager at JPL.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 04/05/2013 01:23 AM
News release: 2013-121                                                                    April. 3, 2013

Used Parachute on Mars Flaps in the Wind

very cool to see!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 04/08/2013 07:47 PM
News release: 2013-127                                                                    April. 8, 2013

Remaining Martian Atmosphere Still Dynamic



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-127&cid=release_2013-127

VIENNA -- Mars has lost much of its original atmosphere, but what's left remains quite active, recent findings from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity indicate. Rover team members reported diverse findings today at the European Geosciences Union 2013 General Assembly, in Vienna.

Evidence has strengthened this month that Mars lost much of its original atmosphere by a process of gas escaping from the top of the atmosphere.

Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument analyzed an atmosphere sample last week using a process that concentrates selected gases. The results provided the most precise measurements ever made of isotopes of argon in the Martian atmosphere. Isotopes are variants of the same element with different atomic weights. "We found arguably the clearest and most robust signature of atmospheric loss on Mars," said Sushil Atreya, a SAM co-investigator at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

SAM found that the Martian atmosphere has about four times as much of a lighter stable isotope (argon-36) compared to a heavier one (argon-38). This removes previous uncertainty about the ratio in the Martian atmosphere from 1976 measurements from NASA's Viking project and from small volumes of argon extracted from Martian meteorites. The ratio is much lower than the solar system's original ratio, as estimated from argon-isotope measurements of the sun and Jupiter. This points to a process at Mars that favored preferential loss of the lighter isotope over the heavier one.

Curiosity measures several variables in today's Martian atmosphere with the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), provided by Spain. While daily air temperature has climbed steadily since the measurements began eight months ago and is not strongly tied to the rover's location, humidity has differed significantly at different places along the rover's route. These are the first systematic measurements of humidity on Mars.

Trails of dust devils have not been seen inside Gale Crater, but REMS sensors detected many whirlwind patterns during the first hundred Martian days of the mission, though not as many as detected in the same length of time by earlier missions. "A whirlwind is a very quick event that happens in a few seconds and should be verified by a combination of pressure, temperature and wind oscillations and, in some cases, a decrease is ultraviolet radiation," said REMS Principal Investigator Javier Gómez-Elvira of the Centro de Astrobiología, Madrid.

Dust distributed by the wind has been examined by Curiosity's laser-firing Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument. Initial laser pulses on each target hit dust. The laser's energy removes the dust to expose underlying material, but those initial pulses also provide information about the dust.

"We knew that Mars is red because of iron oxides in the dust," said ChemCam Deputy Principal Investigator Sylvestre Maurice of the Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie in Toulouse, France. "ChemCam reveals a complex chemical composition of the dust that includes hydrogen, which could be in the form of hydroxyl groups or water molecules."

Possible interchange of water molecules between the atmosphere and the ground is studied by a combination of instruments on the rover, including the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN), provided by Russia under the leadership of DAN Principal Investigator Igor Mitrofanov.

For the rest of April, Curiosity will carry out daily activities for which commands were sent in March, using DAN, REMS and the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD). No new commands are being sent during a four-week period while Mars is passing nearly behind the sun, from Earth's perspective. This geometry occurs about every 26 months and is called Mars solar conjunction.

"After conjunction, Curiosity will be drilling into another rock where the rover is now, but that target has not yet been selected. The science team will discuss this over the conjunction period." said Mars Science Laboratory Project Scientist John Grotzinger, of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to investigate the environmental history within Gale Crater, a location where the project has found that conditions were long ago favorable for microbial life. Curiosity, carrying 10 science instruments, landed in August 2012 to begin its two-year prime mission. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more about the mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl . You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov


- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JayP on 04/09/2013 02:13 AM
I saw this last week and I was a little dismayed at how beat up the wheels were just from short roving here on earth.  There were dents and even holes in the wheels; this does not bode well for long term roving on Mars...

Those wheels have been rolling around in that sandbox for litterly years of testing. They probably have more mileage already than the flight vehicle will get in it's lifetime.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: R7 on 04/09/2013 01:07 PM
I saw this last week and I was a little dismayed at how beat up the wheels were just from short roving here on earth.  There were dents and even holes in the wheels; this does not bode well for long term roving on Mars...

Err the holes are manufactured. They imprint "JPL" in Morse code and are used to measure distances. (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1329) May also help clear sand from the rim inner surface.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JayP on 04/09/2013 02:00 PM
I saw this last week and I was a little dismayed at how beat up the wheels were just from short roving here on earth.  There were dents and even holes in the wheels; this does not bode well for long term roving on Mars...

Err the holes are manufactured. They imprint "JPL" in Morse code and are used to measure distances. (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1329) May also help clear sand from the rim inner surface.

Those are not the holes he was talking about. The Science Channel program showed clips of the test rover at JPL. It's wheels have numeros dents and tears from lots of use.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: R7 on 04/09/2013 02:49 PM
Those are not the holes he was talking about. The Science Channel program showed clips of the test rover at JPL. It's wheels have numeros dents and tears from lots of use.

Oh, thought he referred to the image on the last page, my bad sorry  :)

Is the clip available somewhere online?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 04/12/2013 07:56 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (April 12, 2013): Mars' Bygone Atmosphere

Published on Apr 12, 2013
NASA's Curiosity finds that the Red Planet doesn't have the same atmosphere it used to.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8OUL9QYNpI
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 05/04/2013 03:31 AM
Raw images are now updated.  Images in from sol 263.  They're uploading new flight software before returning to full science.  As I understand it they're going to drill another rock sample before going to Mount Sharp.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 05/04/2013 05:45 AM
Raw images are now updated.  Images in from sol 263.  They're uploading new flight software before returning to full science.  As I understand it they're going to drill another rock sample before going to Mount Sharp.

So that's another month being spent at Glenelg.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jacqmans on 05/09/2013 10:12 PM

RELEASE: 13-136

NASA CURIOSITY ROVER TEAM SELECTS SECOND DRILLING TARGET ON MARS

PASADENA, Calif. -- The team operating NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on
Mars has selected a second target rock for drilling and sampling. The
rover will set course to the drilling location in coming days.

This second drilling target, called "Cumberland," lies about nine feet
(2.75 meters) west of the rock where Curiosity's drill first touched
Martian stone in February. Curiosity took the first rock sample ever
collected on Mars from that rock, called "John Klein." The rover
found evidence of an ancient environment favorable for microbial
life. Both rocks are flat, with pale veins and a bumpy surface. They
are embedded in a layer of rock on the floor of a shallow depression
called "Yellowknife Bay."

This second drilling is intended to confirm results from the first
drilling, which indicated the chemistry of the first powdered sample
from John Klein was much less oxidizing than that of a soil sample
the rover scooped up before it began drilling.

"We know there is some cross-contamination from the previous sample
each time," said Dawn Sumner, a long-term planner for Curiosity's
science team at the University of California at Davis. "For the
Cumberland sample, we expect to have most of that cross-contamination
come from a similar rock, rather than from very different soil."

Although Cumberland and John Klein are very similar, Cumberland
appears to have more of the erosion-resistant granules that cause the
surface bumps. The bumps are concretions, or clumps of minerals,
which formed when water soaked the rock long ago. Analysis of a
sample containing more material from these concretions could provide
information about the variability within the rock layer that includes
both John Klein and Cumberland.

Mission engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in
Pasadena, Calif., recently finished upgrading Curiosity's operating
software following a four-week break. The rover continued monitoring
the Martian atmosphere during the break but the team did not send any
new commands because Mars and the sun were positioned in such a way
the sun could have blocked or corrupted commands sent from Earth.

Curiosity is about nine months into a two-year prime mission since
landing inside Gale Crater on Mars. After the second rock drilling in
Yellowknife Bay and a few other investigations nearby, the rover will
drive toward the base of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile (5-kilometer) tall
layered mountain inside the crater.

JPL manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project, of which Curiosity is
the centerpiece, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in
Washington.

For more information about the mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

To follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter, visit:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

and

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/09/2013 11:04 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (May 9, 2013):

Published on May 9, 2013
JPLNews
Curiosity gets new software and new capabilities for the long trek to Mt. Sharp.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ft5gJbqdzfY
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/10/2013 07:23 PM

May 9, 2013
 
RELEASE : 13-134
 
 
NASA Wins Prestigious Aerospace Industry Awards
 
 
WASHINGTON -- Two prominent aerospace industry organizations are recognizing the contributions of NASA, especially the achievements of the team that landed NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars in August, with coveted awards.

The National Aeronautic Association (NAA) will present its Robert J. Collier Trophy to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Team of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., at an event in Arlington, Va., Thursday night. At an event in Washington on Wednesday, the team received the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Foundation Award.

AIAA also conferred its highest recognition, the title of honorary fellow, on William Gerstenmaier, NASA's associate administrator for human exploration and operations and presented NASA's Associate Administrator for Science, astronaut John Grunsfeld, with its AIAA National Capitol Section Barry Goldwater Educator Award. AIAA recognized two other NASA employees as fellows: Ray G. Clinton of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., and Laurence D. Leavitt of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.

"It's wonderful to see NASA's people and their accomplishments recognized by the aerospace community," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. "In particular, the Curiosity landing was the hardest NASA mission ever attempted in the history of robotic planetary exploration. These prestigious awards are a testament to the dedication and hard work of the entire worldwide team."

The NAA established the Collier Trophy in 1911 and presents it yearly to recognize the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America. The AIAA awards recognize the most influential and inspiring individuals in aerospace, whose outstanding contributions merit the highest accolades. Past honorees have included Orville Wright, Neil Armstrong, the team that designed the space shuttle and the astronauts who carried out the first Hubble Space Telescope repair mission in 1993.

The NAA's Collier citation notes the MSL team's "extraordinary achievements of successfully landing Curiosity on Mars, advancing the nation's technological and engineering capabilities, and significantly improving humanity's understanding of ancient Martian habitable environments."

More than 7,000 people in at least 33 U.S. states and 11 other countries have worked on the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Curiosity, the laboratory's centerpiece, carries 10 science instruments to investigate the environmental history inside Gale Crater on Mars. In March, rover scientists announced an analysis of a rock sample collected there shows Mars could have supported living microbes in an ancient freshwater environment. Curiosity's mission is expected to last at least two years.

"The prestigious Collier Trophy is a wonderful recognition for Curiosity, a phenomenal engineering and science achievement that has captured the hearts and minds of children and adults across America and around the globe," said Charles Elachi, director of JPL. "It's an honor to do missions like this one on behalf of NASA and the nation."

Two other teams from JPL that manage NASA spacecraft, the Dawn mission to the asteroid belt and the Voyager mission to interstellar space, were finalists for the 2012 Collier Trophy.

JPL designed, developed and assembled the rover and manages its mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about the Collier Trophy, visit:

http://www.naa.aero/html/awards/index.cfm?cmsid=62


For more information about the AIAA awards, visit:

http://bit.ly/12j3ey0


For more about the Mars Science Laboratory mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl


For information on other NASA missions and programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

 
- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lar on 05/11/2013 03:23 AM
Those wheels have been rolling around in that sandbox for litterly years of testing.

Litterly? Sandbox? :)

I see what you did there.

Happy about the awards but why Gerst? The teams deserve the fellowships
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/16/2013 11:03 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (May 16, 2013):

 Rover Readies for Second Drilling

Published on May 16, 2013
Curiosity prepares for a second drilling and a tutorial on the complicated choreography to get the drill sample to her instruments.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVwuOByJ5zw
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/17/2013 08:25 PM
News release: 2013-167                                                                   May 17, 2013

Mars Rover Opportunity Examines Clay Clues in Rock



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-167&cid=release_2013-167

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's senior Mars rover, Opportunity, is driving to a new study area after a dramatic finish to 20 months on "Cape York" with examination of a rock intensely altered by water.

The fractured rock, called "Esperance," provides evidence about a wet ancient environment possibly favorable for life. The mission's principal investigator, Steve Squyres of Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., said, "Esperance was so important, we committed several weeks to getting this one measurement of it, even though we knew the clock was ticking."

The mission's engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., had set this week as a deadline for starting a drive toward "Solander Point," where the team plans to keep Opportunity working during its next Martian winter.

"What's so special about Esperance is that there was enough water not only for reactions that produced clay minerals, but also enough to flush out ions set loose by those reactions, so that Opportunity can clearly see the alteration," said Scott McLennan of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, a long-term planner for Opportunity's science team.

This rock's composition is unlike any other Opportunity has investigated during nine years on Mars -- higher in aluminum and silica, lower in calcium and iron.

The next destination, Solander Point, and the area Opportunity is leaving, Cape York, both are segments of the rim of Endeavour Crater, which spans 14 miles (22 kilometers) across. The planned driving route to Solander Point is about 1.4 miles (2.2 kilometers). Cape York has been Opportunity's home since the rover arrived at the western edge of Endeavour in mid-2011 after a two-year trek from a smaller crater.

"Based on our current solar-array dust models, we intend to reach an area of 15 degrees northerly tilt before Opportunity's sixth Martian winter," said JPL's Scott Lever, mission manager. "Solander Point gives us that tilt and may allow us to move around quite a bit for winter science observations."

Northerly tilt increases output from the rover's solar panels during southern-hemisphere winter. Daily sunshine for Opportunity will reach winter minimum in February 2014. The rover needs to be on a favorable slope well before then.

The first drive away from Esperance covered 81.7 feet (24.9 meters) on May 14. Three days earlier, Opportunity finished exposing a patch of the rock's interior with the rock abrasion tool. The team used a camera and spectrometer on the robotic arm to examine Esperance.

The team identified Esperance while exploring a portion of Cape York where the Compact Reconnaissance Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter had detected a clay mineral. Clays typically form in wet environments that are not harshly acidic. For years, Opportunity had been finding evidence for ancient wet environments that were very acidic. The CRISM findings prompted the rover team to investigate the area where clay had been detected from orbit. There, they found an outcrop called "Whitewater Lake," containing a small amount of clay from alteration by exposure to water.

"There appears to have been extensive, but weak, alteration of Whitewater Lake, but intense alteration of Esperance along fractures that provided conduits for fluid flow," Squyres said. "Water that moved through fractures during this rock's history would have provided more favorable conditions for biology than any other wet environment recorded in rocks Opportunity has seen."

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Project launched Opportunity to Mars on July 7, 2003, about a month after its twin rover, Spirit. Both were sent for three-month prime missions to study the history of wet environments on ancient Mars and continued working in extended missions. Spirit ceased operations in 2010.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. For more about Opportunity, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/rovers and http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov . You can follow the project on Twitter and on Facebook at: http://twitter.com/MarsRovers and http://www.facebook.com/mars.rovers .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov


- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Lar on 05/17/2013 08:41 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (May 16, 2013):

 Rover Readies for Second Drilling

Published on May 16, 2013
Curiosity prepares for a second drilling and a tutorial on the complicated choreography to get the drill sample to her instruments.


A tutorial? Who is getting a tutorial? Anyone know how to clarify that? I didn't think one typically trained robots unless they're neural network based.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 05/19/2013 12:30 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (May 16, 2013):

 Rover Readies for Second Drilling

Published on May 16, 2013
Curiosity prepares for a second drilling and a tutorial on the complicated choreography to get the drill sample to her instruments.


A tutorial? Who is getting a tutorial? Anyone know how to clarify that? I didn't think one typically trained robots unless they're neural network based.

My guess would be to execute a pre-determined choreography on drilling into a rock, only that it's a location where there is no rock (or there is a rock but they don't execute a drilling).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 05/20/2013 04:10 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (May 16, 2013):

 Rover Readies for Second Drilling

Published on May 16, 2013
Curiosity prepares for a second drilling and a tutorial on the complicated choreography to get the drill sample to her instruments.


A tutorial? Who is getting a tutorial? Anyone know how to clarify that? I didn't think one typically trained robots unless they're neural network based.

It's part of the anthropomorphism that seems to drive representation of these machines.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 05/20/2013 11:02 PM
NASA Mars Rover Curiosity Drills Second Rock Target
05.20.2013

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has used the drill on its robotic arm to collect a powdered sample from the interior of a rock called "Cumberland."
Plans call for delivering portions of the sample in coming days to laboratory instruments inside the rover. This is only the second time that a sample has been collected from inside a rock on Mars. The first was Curiosity's drilling at a target called "John Klein" three months ago. Cumberland resembles John Klein and lies about nine feet (2.75 meters) farther west. Both are within a shallow depression called "Yellowknife Bay."

The hole that Curiosity drilled into Cumberland on May 19 is about 0.6 inch (1.6 centimeters) in diameter and about 2.6 inches (6.6 centimeters) deep.

The science team expects to use analysis of material from Cumberland to check findings from John Klein. Preliminary findings from analysis of John Klein rock powder by Curiosity's onboard laboratory instruments indicate that the location long ago had environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. The favorable conditions included the key elemental ingredients for life, an energy gradient that could be exploited by microbes, and water that was not harshly acidic or briny.


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1475
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/20/2013 11:10 PM
Curiosity Drills Into Mars Again - First Image | Video

Published on May 20, 2013
The Mars Science Laboratory has completed its second drill into the surface of the Red Planet. The drilling target was nicknamed 'Cumberland'.

Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Original Music by Mark Peterson,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7PzJTYm1Qs
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 05/21/2013 05:10 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (May 16, 2013):

 Rover Readies for Second Drilling

Published on May 16, 2013
Curiosity prepares for a second drilling and a tutorial on the complicated choreography to get the drill sample to her instruments.


A tutorial? Who is getting a tutorial? Anyone know how to clarify that? I didn't think one typically trained robots unless they're neural network based.

The "and" is not used well...

The latest curiosity update report ALSO included a tutorial on how samples are moved from place to place by the rover.  It was actually very interesting....

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: dsmillman on 05/27/2013 04:58 PM
NASA Discusses Curiosity Radiation Findings

May 27, 2013

Trent J. Perrotto
Headquarters, Washington                               
202-358-1100
trent.j.perrotto@nasa.gov

MEDIA ADVISORY: M13-085

NASA DISCUSSES CURIOSITY RADIATION FINDINGS

WASHINGTON -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 2:30 p.m. EDT Thursday, May 30, to present new findings from the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) aboard the rover Curiosity.

The journal Science has embargoed details until 2 p.m. May 30.

The briefing participants are:

-- Donald M. Hassler, RAD principal investigator and program director, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio
-- Cary Zeitlin, principal scientist, SwRI
-- Eddie Semones, spaceflight radiation health officer, NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston
-- Chris Moore, deputy director of advanced exploration systems, NASA Headquarters, Washington

For dial-in information, media representatives should e-mail their name, affiliation and telephone number to Trent Perrotto at trent.j.perrotto@nasa.gov by noon May 30.

SwRI and Christian Albrechts University in Kiel, Germany, built RAD with funding from NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate and Germany's national aerospace research center, Deutsches Zentrum fC<r Luft- und Raumfahrt. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project. NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington manages the Mars Exploration Program.

Visuals will be posted at the start of the teleconference on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory website at:

http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon

Audio of the teleconference will be streamed live on NASA's website
at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

   
-end-
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 05/27/2013 11:18 PM
NASA Discusses Curiosity Radiation Findings

May 27, 2013

Trent J. Perrotto
Headquarters, Washington                               
202-358-1100
trent.j.perrotto@nasa.gov

MEDIA ADVISORY: M13-085

NASA DISCUSSES CURIOSITY RADIATION FINDINGS

WASHINGTON -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 2:30 p.m. EDT Thursday, May 30, to present new findings from the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) aboard the rover Curiosity.

The journal Science has embargoed details until 2 p.m. May 30....

Yay!  We are finally getting a paper on the sciene, the first one I think.  By this stage more than a dozen had been published on the MERs.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/29/2013 06:56 PM
Curiosity's 9-Month 'Dance' On Mars Time-Lapsed By Tech Geek | Video

Published on May 29, 2013
Professional programmer Karl Sanford wrote a program to compile images from Sol 0 (August 8th, 2012) through Sol 281 (May 21st, 2013) from the Mars Science Laboratory website.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkmDM376-nE
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/30/2013 09:46 PM
News release: 2013-183                                                                   May 30, 2013

Data From NASA Rover's Voyage to Mars Aids Planning



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-183&cid=release_2013-183

PASADENA, Calif. -- Measurements taken by NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission as it delivered the Curiosity rover to Mars in 2012 are providing NASA the information it needs to design systems to protect human explorers from radiation exposure on deep-space expeditions in the future.

Curiosity's Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is the first instrument to measure the radiation environment during a Mars cruise mission from inside a spacecraft that is similar to potential human exploration spacecraft. The findings reduce uncertainty about the effectiveness of radiation shielding and provide vital information to space mission designers who will need to build in protection for spacecraft occupants in the future.

"As this nation strives to reach an asteroid and Mars in our lifetimes, we're working to solve every puzzle nature poses to keep astronauts safe so they can explore the unknown and return home," said William Gerstenmaier, NASA's associate administrator for human exploration and operations in Washington. "We learn more about the human body's ability to adapt to space every day aboard the International Space Station. As we build the Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket to carry and shelter us in deep space, we'll continue to make the advances we need in life sciences to reduce risks for our explorers. Curiosity's RAD instrument is giving us critical data we need so that we humans, like the rover, can dare mighty things to reach the Red Planet."

The findings, which are published in the May 31 edition of the journal Science, indicate radiation exposure for human explorers could exceed NASA's career limit for astronauts if current propulsion systems are used.

Two forms of radiation pose potential health risks to astronauts in deep space. One is galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), particles caused by supernova explosions and other high-energy events outside the solar system. The other is solar energetic particles (SEPs) associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections from the sun.

Radiation exposure is measured in units of Sievert (Sv) or milliSievert (one one-thousandth Sv). Long-term population studies have shown exposure to radiation increases a person's lifetime cancer risk. Exposure to a dose of 1 Sv, accumulated over time, is associated with a five percent increase in risk for developing fatal cancer.

NASA has established a three percent increased risk of fatal cancer as an acceptable career limit for its astronauts currently operating in low-Earth orbit. The RAD data showed the Curiosity rover was exposed to an average of 1.8 milliSieverts of GCR per day on its journey to Mars. Only about three percent of the radiation dose was associated with solar particles because of a relatively quiet solar cycle and the shielding provided by the spacecraft.

The RAD data will help inform current discussions in the United States' medical community, which is working to establish exposure limits for deep-space explorers in the future.

"In terms of accumulated dose, it's like getting a whole-body CT scan once every five or six days," said Cary Zeitlin, a principal scientist at the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio and lead author of the paper on the findings. "Understanding the radiation environment inside a spacecraft carrying humans to Mars or other deep space destinations is critical for planning future crewed missions."

Current spacecraft shield much more effectively against SEPs than GCRs. To protect against the comparatively low energy of typical SEPs, astronauts might need to move into havens with extra shielding on a spacecraft or on the Martian surface, or employ other countermeasures. GCRs tend to be highly energetic, highly penetrating particles that are not stopped by the modest shielding provided by a typical spacecraft.

"Scientists need to validate theories and models with actual measurements, which RAD is now providing," said Donald M. Hassler, a program director at SwRI and principal investigator of the RAD investigation. "These measurements will be used to better understand how radiation travels through deep space and how it is affected and changed by the spacecraft structure itself. The spacecraft protects somewhat against lower energy particles, but others can propagate through the structure unchanged or break down into secondary particles."

After Curiosity landed on Mars in August, the RAD instrument continued operating, measuring the radiation environment on the planet's surface. RAD data collected during Curiosity's science mission will continue to inform plans to protect astronauts as NASA designs future missions to Mars in the coming decades.

SwRI, together with Christian Albrechts University in Kiel, Germany, built RAD with funding from NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate and Germany's national aerospace research center, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project and the project's Curiosity rover. The NASA Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington manages the Mars Exploration Program.

For more information about the mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl . To follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter visit: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

For more information about NASA human spaceflight and exploration, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/exploration .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Trent Perrotto 202-358-1100
NASA Headquarters, Washington
trent.j.perrotto@nasa.gov

Deb Schmid 210-522-2254
Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio
deb.schmid@swri.org


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Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 05/30/2013 09:50 PM
News feature: 2013-181                                                                   May 30, 2013

Pebbly Rocks Testify to Old Streambed on Mars



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-181&cid=release_2013-181

PASADENA, Calif. - Detailed analysis and review have borne out researchers' initial interpretation of pebble-containing slabs that NASA's Mars rover Curiosity investigated last year: They are part of an ancient streambed.

The rocks are the first ever found on Mars that contain streambed gravels. The sizes and shapes of the gravels embedded in these conglomerate rocks -- from the size of sand particles to the size of golf balls -- enabled researchers to calculate the depth and speed of the water that once flowed at this location.

"We completed more rigorous quantification of the outcrops to characterize the size distribution and roundness of the pebbles and sand that make up these conglomerates," said Rebecca Williams of the Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, Ariz., lead author of a report about them in the journal Science this week. "We ended up with a calculation in the same range as our initial estimate last fall. At a minimum, the stream was flowing at a speed equivalent to a walking pace -- a meter, or three feet, per second -- and it was ankle-deep to hip-deep."

Three pavement-like rocks examined with the telephoto capability of Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) during the rover's first 40 days on Mars are the basis for the new report. One, "Goulburn," is immediately adjacent to the rover's "Bradbury Landing" touchdown site. The other two, "Link" and "Hottah," are about 165 and 330 feet (50 and 100 meters) to the southeast. Researchers also used the rover's laser-shooting Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument to investigate the Link rock.

"These conglomerates look amazingly like streambed deposits on Earth," Williams said. "Most people are familiar with rounded river pebbles. Maybe you've picked up a smoothed, round rock to skip across the water. Seeing something so familiar on another world is exciting and also gratifying."

The larger pebbles are not distributed evenly in the conglomerate rocks. In Hottah, researchers detected alternating pebble-rich layers and sand layers. This is common in streambed deposits on Earth and provides additional evidence for stream flow on Mars. In addition, many of the pebbles are touching each other, a sign that they rolled along the bed of a stream.

"Our analysis of the amount of rounding of the pebbles provided further information," said Sanjeev Gupta of Imperial College, London, a co-author of the new report. "The rounding indicates sustained flow. It occurs as pebbles hit each other multiple times. This wasn't a one-off flow. It was sustained, certainly more than weeks or months, though we can't say exactly how long."

The stream carried the gravels at least a few miles, or kilometers, the researchers estimated.

The atmosphere of modern Mars is too thin to make a sustained stream flow of water possible, though the planet holds large quantities of water ice. Several types of evidence have indicated that ancient Mars had diverse environments with liquid water. However, none but these rocks found by Curiosity could provide the type of stream flow information published this week. Curiosity's images of conglomerate rocks indicate that atmospheric conditions at Gale Crater once enabled the flow of liquid water on the Martian surface.

During a two-year prime mission, researchers are using Curiosity's 10 science instruments to assess the environmental history in Gale Crater on Mars, where the rover has found evidence of ancient environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

More information about Curiosity is online at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .

You can follow the mission on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

2013-181


- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 06/03/2013 11:34 PM
News release: 2013-185                                                                   Jun. 3, 2013

NASA to Host June 5 Teleconference on Curiosity Mars Rover



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-185&cid=release_2013-185

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA will host a media teleconference at 11:30 a.m. PDT (2:30 p.m. EDT), Wednesday, June 5 to provide an update about the Mars Science Laboratory mission and activities of the Curiosity rover.

The briefing participants will be:

-- Jim Erickson, Mars Science Laboratory project manager, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
-- Joy Crisp, Mars Science Laboratory deputy project scientist, JPL
-- Joe Melko, Mars Science Laboratory sampling activity lead, JPL

The NASA Mars rover Curiosity is approximately 10 months into a two-year prime mission to investigate the environmental history of an area inside Mars' Gale Crater, where it has already found evidence of ancient environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

Visuals will be posted at the start of the event at: http://go.nasa.gov/curiositytelecon .

For information about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

Guy Webster/Elena Mejia 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / elena.mejia@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov


- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 06/04/2013 04:18 AM
Probably preliminary results of the second drilling location
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 06/04/2013 12:57 PM
Pebbles, huh?

Quote from: Rebecca Williams
We ended up with a calculation in the same range as our initial estimate last fall. At a minimum, the stream was flowing at a speed equivalent to a walking pace -- a meter, or three feet, per second -- and it was ankle-deep to hip-deep.

The pebbles in the article are not nearly as rounded as the pebbles here in Mechum's river.

So how long does it take, in that reduced gravity, for those martian pebbles to get as rounded as they are?

A hundred thousand years?  A million years?

How long did the water flow?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 06/04/2013 11:21 PM
Pebbles, huh?

Quote from: Rebecca Williams
We ended up with a calculation in the same range as our initial estimate last fall. At a minimum, the stream was flowing at a speed equivalent to a walking pace -- a meter, or three feet, per second -- and it was ankle-deep to hip-deep.

The pebbles in the article are not nearly as rounded as the pebbles here in Mechum's river.

So how long does it take, in that reduced gravity, for those martian pebbles to get as rounded as they are?

A hundred thousand years?  A million years?

How long did the water flow?

That a difficult question.  As a geologist would define them, those pebbles are subrounded to rounded.  This is reasonable considering the travel distance and the igenous rocks that they are composed of, which are generally quite hard.

The maximum likely travel distance is of the order of 40 km or so, from up on the rim. 

The pebbles are unlikely to be recyled, they have been trasnported from bedrock to where they are now, rather than reworking of older pebbles.

Pebble beds are typically deposited in high energy flow events lasting minutes to hours.  During these events they may move a few m to several km, tending on veolcity and duration. Thus many flow events will be needed to shift the pebbles from their source to where they are now.  On terrestrial fans such flows might happen once of twice a season, to once every few thousand years in hyper arid environments. 

How long it takes on Mars is anybody's guess.  I would suspect that the deposits seen here would respresent episodic processes over a few thousand to a few million years.  Which isn't long.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Targeteer on 06/05/2013 06:30 PM
telecon about to begin
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 06/05/2013 07:15 PM
Curiosity Mars Rover Drilling Into Its Second Rocks

Published on Jun 5, 2013
This sequence of images from the Front Hazard-Avoidance Camera on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows the rover drilling into a rock target "Cumberland" on May 19, 2013.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6jf82YfupU
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 06/05/2013 08:05 PM
NASA Teleconference on Curiosity Mars Rover - June 5
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8307
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 06/05/2013 10:32 PM
News release: 2013-187                                                                   Jun. 5, 2013

NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover Nears Turning Point



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-187&cid=release_2013-187

Mars Science Laboratory Mission Status Report

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is approaching its biggest turning point since landing its rover, Curiosity, inside Mars' Gale Crater last summer.

Curiosity is finishing investigations in an area smaller than a football field where it has been working for six months, and it will soon shift to a distance-driving mode headed for an area about 5 miles (8 kilometers) away, at the base Mount Sharp.

In May, the mission drilled a second rock target for sample material and delivered portions of that rock powder into laboratory instruments in one week, about one-fourth as much time as needed at the first drilled rock.

"We're hitting full stride," said Mars Science Laboratory Project Manager Jim Erickson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "We needed a more deliberate pace for all the first-time activities by Curiosity since landing, but we won't have many more of those."

No additional rock drilling or soil scooping is planned in the "Glenelg" area that Curiosity entered last fall as the mission's first destination after landing. To reach Glenelg, the rover drove east about a third of a mile (500 meters) from the landing site. To reach the next destination, Mount Sharp, Curiosity will drive toward the southwest for many months.

"We don't know when we'll get to Mount Sharp," Erickson said. "This truly is a mission of exploration, so just because our end goal is Mount Sharp doesn't mean we're not going to investigate interesting features along the way."

Images of Mount Sharp taken from orbit and images Curiosity has taken from a distance reveal many layers where scientists anticipate finding evidence about how the ancient Martian environment changed and evolved.

While completing major first-time activities since landing, the mission has also already accomplished its main science objective. Analysis of rock powder from the first drilled rock target, "John Klein," provided evidence that an ancient environment in Gale Crater had favorable conditions for microbial life: the essential elemental ingredients, energy and ponded water that was neither too acidic nor too briny.

The rover team chose a similar rock, "Cumberland," as the second drilling target to provide a check for the findings at John Klein. Scientists are analyzing laboratory-instrument results from portions of the Cumberland sample. One new capability being used is to drive away while still holding rock powder in Curiosity's sample-handling device to supply additional material to instruments later if desired by the science team.

For the drill campaign at Cumberland, steps that each took a day or more at John Klein could be combined into a single day's sequence of commands. "We used the experience and lessons from our first drilling campaign, as well as new cached sample capabilities, to do the second drill campaign far more efficiently," said sampling activity lead Joe Melko of JPL. "In addition, we increased use of the rover's autonomous self-protection. This allowed more activities to be strung together before the ground team had to check in on the rover."

The science team has chosen three targets for brief observations before Curiosity leaves the Glenelg area: the boundary between bedrock areas of mudstone and sandstone, a layered outcrop called "Shaler" and a pitted outcrop called "Point Lake."

JPL's Joy Crisp, deputy project scientist for Curiosity, said "Shaler might be a river deposit. Point Lake might be volcanic or sedimentary. A closer look at them could give us better understanding of how the rocks we sampled with the drill fit into the history of how the environment changed."

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. For more about the mission, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov


- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 06/06/2013 03:23 AM
Still no data then.... :(
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 06/06/2013 06:14 PM
Advisory: 2013-192                                                                   Jun. 6, 2013

NASA to Host June 7 Mars Rover Opportunity Teleconference



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-192&cid=release_2013-192

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA will hold a media teleconference at 9 a.m. PDT (noon EDT) on Friday, June 7, to provide an update about the long-lived Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The 10th anniversary of this rover's launch is next month.

The briefing participants will be:

-- John Callas, project manager for Opportunity, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
-- Steve Squyres, principal investigator for Opportunity, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.
-- Ray Arvidson, deputy principal investigator for Opportunity, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 .

Visuals will be posted at the start of the event at: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mer/telecon/20130607.html .

For information about NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Project and the twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/rovers and http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov .

Guy Webster/Elena Mejia 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / elena.mejia@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov


- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 06/07/2013 06:33 PM
Curiosity Rover Report (June 7, 2013): Rover Ready to Switch Gears

Published on Jun 7, 2013
NASA's Curiosity rover switches to long-distance driving mode as she heads to Mount Sharp.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GH56wMh3FZg

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 06/07/2013 06:36 PM
NASA Mars Rover News - June 7
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8313
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 06/14/2013 03:21 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (June 13, 2013): Curiosity's Cameras

Published on Jun 13, 2013
Curiosity is at Point Lake on Mars and will snap pictures to send home. Find out more about the rover's 17 cameras, including why some shoot in color and others others take black-and-white images.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2rwWECbEHg
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 06/19/2013 06:50 PM
Image Advisory: 2013-205                                                                  June 19, 2013

Billion-Pixel View of Mars Comes From Curiosity Rover



The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-205&cid=release_2013-205

PASADENA, Calif. -- A billion-pixel view from the surface of Mars, from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, offers armchair explorers a way to examine one part of the Red Planet in great detail.

The first NASA-produced view from the surface of Mars larger than one billion pixels stitches together nearly 900 exposures taken by cameras onboard Curiosity and shows details of the landscape along the rover's route.

The 1.3-billion-pixel image is available for perusal with pan and zoom tools at: http://mars.nasa.gov/bp1/ .

The full-circle scene surrounds the site where Curiosity collected its first scoops of dusty sand at a windblown patch called "Rocknest," and extends to Mount Sharp on the horizon.

"It gives a sense of place and really shows off the cameras' capabilities," said Bob Deen of the Multi-Mission Image Processing Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "You can see the context and also zoom in to see very fine details."

Deen assembled the product using 850 frames from the telephoto camera of Curiosity's Mast Camera instrument, supplemented with 21 frames from the Mastcam's wider-angle camera and 25 black-and-white frames -- mostly of the rover itself -- from the Navigation Camera. The images were taken on several different Mars days between Oct. 5 and Nov. 16, 2012. Raw single-frame images received from Curiosity are promptly posted on a public website at: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/ . Mars fans worldwide have used those images to assemble mosaic views, including at least one gigapixel scene.

The new mosaic from NASA shows illumination effects from variations in the time of day for pieces of the mosaic. It also shows variations in the clarity of the atmosphere due to variable dustiness during the month while the images were acquired.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory project is using Curiosity and the rover's 10 science instruments to investigate the environmental history within Gale Crater, a location where the project has found that conditions were long ago favorable for microbial life.

Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates Curiosity's Mastcam. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington and built the Navigation Camera and the rover.

More information about the mission is online at: http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

For more information about the Multi-Mission Image Processing Laboratory, see: http://www-mipl.jpl.nasa.gov/mipex.html .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

- end -

Below is a reduced version of panorama from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity with 1.3 billion pixels in the full-resolution version. It shows Curiosity at the "Rocknest" site where the rover scooped up samples of windblown dust and sand. Curiosity used three cameras to take the component images on several different days between Oct. 5 and Nov. 16, 2012. Viewers can explore this image with pan and zoom controls at http://mars.nasa.gov/bp1/.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Full size image can be found here:
http://mars.nasa.gov/multimedia/interactives/billionpixel/
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 07/03/2013 04:59 AM
Trying to figure out where the updates are it seems like Facebook and Twitter are getting the info while the main jpl page and youtube are dormant.

https://twitter.com/marscuriosity

https://www.facebook.com/MarsCuriosity

Curiosity has been visiting Point Lake and is now at Shaler.

The raw images site is going so slow it might be quicker to direct download from Mars  :D

Here's a few shots from Shaler I've picked out. Enjoy  8)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/03/2013 05:44 AM
Trying to figure out where the updates are it seems like Facebook and Twitter are getting the info while the main jpl page and youtube are dormant.

https://twitter.com/marscuriosity

https://www.facebook.com/MarsCuriosity

Curiosity has been visiting Point Lake and is now at Shaler.

The raw images site is going so slow it might be quicker to direct download from Mars  :D

Here's a few shots from Shaler I've picked out. Enjoy  8)

Cross bedded sandstone....
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: mlindner on 07/03/2013 06:02 AM
Trying to figure out where the updates are it seems like Facebook and Twitter are getting the info while the main jpl page and youtube are dormant.

https://twitter.com/marscuriosity

https://www.facebook.com/MarsCuriosity

Curiosity has been visiting Point Lake and is now at Shaler.

The raw images site is going so slow it might be quicker to direct download from Mars  :D

Here's a few shots from Shaler I've picked out. Enjoy  8)

Cross bedded sandstone....

For us non-geologists, whats the significance of "cross bedded sandstone?"
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: jebbo on 07/03/2013 11:35 AM
For us non-geologists, whats the significance of "cross bedded sandstone?"

The deposition mechanism: was it aeolian (wind) or fluvial (water)?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/04/2013 11:31 PM

Cross bedded sandstone....

For us non-geologists, whats the significance of "cross bedded sandstone?"

Jebbo is right, cross-bedding forms when sand is deposited in a specific velocity regime.  From it we can infer things like flow velocity, grainsize, depositional environment, and transport direction.  They are very important palaeoenvironmental indicators.  With a bit more work we can determine whether they were deposited by wind or water, and by what sort of bedform (which type of bar or dune).
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 07/06/2013 05:03 AM
"ROAD TRIP!"

Curiosity's started her drive to Mt. Sharp.  This could take 6 mos. to a year to do.  If it takes an earth year to get there from this day, then she'd get there about 90 days before a big comet approaches Mars.  Lots of spectacular views possible.  Looking forward to her arrival, and seeing those daily raw images showing the drive will be very interesting, at least to me.

A link to an announcement from the USGS Astrogeology page:

http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/news?id=news/sol-326-update-on-curiosity-from-usgs-scientist-ken-herkenhoff-road-trip
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/07/2013 10:06 PM
At the rate taken since landing Curiosity will be at the foothills of Mt Sharp in about a decade...
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 07/07/2013 10:48 PM
At the rate taken since landing Curiosity will be at the foothills of Mt Sharp in about a decade...

Not quite. Looking at the pics it does seem like they have a bit of a boring drive through a flat rocky area.

Perhaps it was worth investigating the interesting features near the landing site.

This drive seems to be progressing well. No thick sand. I suspect JPL don't want to release an official update until they've clocked some miles so they can't be accused of having gone nowhere in a whole year.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/08/2013 04:31 AM
At the rate taken since landing Curiosity will be at the foothills of Mt Sharp in about a decade...

Not quite. Looking at the pics it does seem like they have a bit of a boring drive through a flat rocky area.

Not much was expected on the road to Gelnelg (although anyone from Adelaide could have told them differently ;) ).  I am sure they will see lots of potentially interesting things cand have to cose between driving on, brief stop to do contact science and ChemCam work, or a more detailed site investigation.

Quote
Perhaps it was worth investigating the interesting features near the landing site.

I think so, although to date we only have had one paper (although lots of abstracts)

Quote
This drive seems to be progressing well. No thick sand. I suspect JPL don't want to release an official update until they've clocked some miles so they can't be accused of having gone nowhere in a whole year.

I don't think they have got very far as yet.  One drive of just under 18 m on Sol 324. http://curiosityrover.com/tracking/drivelog.html

I don't think sand will be an issue until they get close to the foothills of Mt Sharp, then there is the barchan belt to negotiate.  This will be quite interesting as satellite imagery indicates that these are near 10 m high and that their surfaces are actiively moving.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: notsorandom on 07/08/2013 01:02 PM
Getting to Mt. Sharp or not lets remember that MSL has already accomplished all of its mission goals. Everything else at this point is a bonus, and I am sure that there are many more interesting things that will be discovered before it reaches the mountain.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/08/2013 01:25 PM
Getting to Mt. Sharp or not lets remember that MSL has already accomplished all of its mission goals. Everything else at this point is a bonus, and I am sure that there are many more interesting things that will be discovered before it reaches the mountain.

One of those goals was to search for "signs of possible life".  I haven't heard an official announcement that this goal had been met.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 07/08/2013 01:41 PM
Yes,  the process of searching has been successful.  That was the goal.  The results of the search is a different matter
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: pippin on 07/08/2013 02:09 PM
You can't credibly set a goal of actually finding something of which you don't know whether it's there.
The whole "signs of life on Mars" story (at least in general publications) is already on the brink of fudging up stories just because people WANT to hear that signs of life have been found (although all the evidence found so far strongly suggest there has been none because on earth it's so ubiquitous that you will immediately find it's signs wherever you look and that probably wouldn't change for hundreds of millions of years even if it completely died now).

Your goal can be whether life is or has been possible and to search whether or not there are signs for it and whatever you find is the result and if the result is conclusive (in whatever direction) and procedurally OK, then that's a success.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/08/2013 02:57 PM
Yes,  the process of searching has been successful.  That was the goal.  The results of the search is a different matter

Mission accomplished?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 07/08/2013 03:00 PM
One of those goals was to search for "signs of possible life".

I thought it was to search for signs of past habitability?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 07/08/2013 08:00 PM
I thought it was to search for signs of past habitability?
Indeed it is. From the mission fact sheet: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/fact_sheets/mars-science-laboratory.pdf
Quote
The overarching science goal of the mission is to assess whether the landing area has ever had or still has environmental conditions favorable to microbial life, both its habitability and its preservation.
(my bold)
Every time questions about life come up in the press conferences, the team go out of their way to emphasize that that the mission is about habitability not past or present life detection.

They did announce that preliminary results from the John Klein mudstone showed it was a relatively habitable environment at some point in the past. Considering that they expected to have to drive many km to even get to that kind of environment, it's seems difficult to argue that they are behind on their goals.

Based on MER experience, we should expect the pace of drives to pick up significantly once they get into the swing of things.

Of course, it's a science driven mission, so there will undoubtedly be stops and detours along the way.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 07/08/2013 11:36 PM
An update!!!  :o

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-215
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/09/2013 01:40 AM
Yes,  the process of searching has been successful.  That was the goal.  The results of the search is a different matter

Mission accomplished?

... the rover found evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life. This means the mission already accomplished its main science objective.  (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-215)

Looks like me and Jim are both right!

YPMV  (Your Parsing Might Vary)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: RigelFive on 07/09/2013 06:17 AM
An update!!!  :o

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-215
Hmmmmph!

If it takes a nuclear powered rover ONE EARTH YEAR to reach its target by creeping along the surface of Mars... wouldst reason not provide for another rover sent from Earth to just intrinsically arrive at said target in less time?   Perhaps next time, a multi rover mission would be a smidge cheaper, faster, harder, stronger, et cetera, et cetera, in order to reach said target?

Also, when the MSL rover actually arrives at Mount Sharp, will the habitability of Mars suddenly become apparent?  So then like, all of the manned Mars missions will then land at Mount Sharp?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 07/09/2013 07:04 AM
It's all about the landing zone.

They didn't want to be flying the skycrane near the mountain.

This photo was uploaded a while back showing how far Curiosity has to travel.

I thought they were going through the black sand but it looks like they are charting their way around it.

The main science objective for this mission has already been met. They didn't have to sift through all the layers of Mt Sharp to find what they were looking for.

Now everything is a bonus. Perhaps they will now be able to ascertain at what times and for how long Mars was habitable.

The next Mars lander (Insight) will have a whole new set of science objectives. It's not a rover and it's designed to look farther underneath the surface than Curiosity can with it's short drill and laser.

Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/09/2013 11:25 AM
Yesterday the rover drove almost 40 m http://curiosityrover.com/tracking/drivelog.html
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/09/2013 01:07 PM
Also, when the MSL rover actually arrives at Mount Sharp, will the habitability of Mars suddenly become apparent?

We now know that "the rover found evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life".

The mission has "already accomplished its main science objective".  By this metric, the mission is already a complete success.  This is the only metric that matters.  You know that.

What we have now are the bonus science objectives, literally at no extra cost.

You should also know that general questions about the "why" of this mission, beyond the demonstrated current success, are not appreciated.  Once the experts decide what they want to do next, you will be informed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/10/2013 01:27 PM
Waitamartianminute!  Everything from now on "is a bonus"?!  Does that mean that LIKE we, the taxpayers of the United States can finally use the MSL rover to perform a paucity of science objectives?

Which raises an interesting point:  Is a martian minute the same as some two Earth minutes?

Seriously, to me, there is a very strong argument for practice.  The vehicle is up there; all is not known about weather, geography, driving and communication issues.  These techniques can be honed, as they should be, over time.  It would be a mistake if they only let one person run the rover, and not broaden the operating experience of the team; there is plenty of time for them to put up info on their website regarding that.

There is another very strong point which completely accepts the long journey to their next destination.  There's plenty of time, at least, to find a fossil.  Or a bug.  The chances of finding the former seem slim, but the chances of finding the latter seem fat.  At least on the surface of the planet, the search for macro evidence of life, past or present, can take place, as long as it is incidental to the continuing main scientific approach.

Remember, the mission has "already accomplished its main science objective"; that is, the rover has "found evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life".   There was no  possible way to find "evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life", other than to ground truth this fact.  At $2.6B, this one fact is an obvious bargain, as anyone can see.

The taxpayer can be forgiven for not having correctly parsed the wording of the limitations of the stated mission objectives all those years ago, when the funding of the mission was being discussed. 

If you, R5, thought that this mission was about the search for a second genesis of life on Mars, unfortunately, you would have been completely wrong.  That hypothetical search has nothing to do with this mission.

The mission is a complete success, and every scientific fact that they next discover is a bonus.

YPMV.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: spectre9 on 07/11/2013 12:44 AM
JPL employs as many people as they possibly can to operate Curiosity.

It's very much a team effort deciding what to look at with what instruments and for how long.

They might have been able to meet the primary science objective in one area but if they can find more evidence of habitable environments in the layers of Mt Sharp that would be a good thing to do.

The instrumentation of Curiosity clearly goes way beyond that of the MER rovers. There's so much more science that can be done but being authorized for an extended mission usually comes with a smaller budget.

Perhaps JPL will only be keeping those scientists predisposed to fossil hunting and optimistic about finding life on Mars  ;)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 07/11/2013 02:46 AM
We now know that "the rover found evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life".

The mission has "already accomplished its main science objective".  By this metric, the mission is already a complete success.  This is the only metric that matters.  You know that.
Both you and RigelFive continue to "flat out not get it"

The overall theme of the MSL science investigation is past and present habitability. This guided the selection of the instruments and landing site, and continues to guide the science investigations. It doesn't mean that as soon as you spot a potentially habitable environment, you check that box off and that objective is done.

The mission is about building as complete a picture as possible. Quoting  Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-012-9892-2/fulltext.html)

Quote
The Mars Science Laboratory Mission will explore and quantitatively assess the habitability and environmental history of the Gale crater field site (landing ellipse, adjacent lower portion of Mount Sharp). As described in the 2004 Announcement of Opportunity solicitation, the mission has the primary objective of placing a mobile science laboratory on the surface of Mars to assess the biological potential of the landing site, characterize the geology of the landing region, investigate planetary processes that influence habitability, and characterize the broad spectrum of surface radiation.
(my bold)

So yes, the results in Glenelg is a great start, but it's only a start. We are very far from having a coherent picture of habitability at Gale.

There are also specific mission success criteria. However these are not given in terms of specific results (if we knew the results, there would be no reason to send the mission), but rather in terms of number of samples analyzed, distance driven etc. These have certainly not all been completed.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/11/2013 01:16 PM
We now know that "the rover found evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life".

The mission has "already accomplished its main science objective".  By this metric, the mission is already a complete success.  This is the only metric that matters.  You know that.

Both you and RigelFive continue to "flat out not get it" ...

Parse away, kemosabe.

Quote from: Hop
The overall theme of the MSL science investigation is past and present habitability...

The mission is about building as complete a picture as possible. ...

There are also specific mission success criteria.

The mission has "already accomplished its main science objective".  Overall themes, and "completing" pictures are bonus elements.  You should not have a problem with that.

The mission is already a success.  Sheesh.

Up thread, some are complaining about the pace of the coming year's travel.  After all, Lewis and Clark traveled much faster.  Of course, speed is not the point of the continuing work up there, and you know that.

I made two salient points about that, but you chose to parse them out of your acknowledged awareness.

They simply must practice operating the machine, and ensuring that it doesn't get stuck, etc.  You may not agree, but they should take their time and get the operations correct in their attempt to "complete" as much of the habitability picture as they can.

Secondly, it would be foolish for anyone to expect that they'd find a macroscopic "Melvin", even a fossilized one, upon landing and traveling such a short distance.  Who knows, over the coming year, if such a discovery will be made?

We all know that the mission parameters do not explicitly state that there would be an organized search for macroscopic life; this would be a bonus in the best of worlds.  It would be shocking, however, to the taxpayer community, for them to publicly admit that they would ignore such a fortuitous find.  Some of us believe this is a glass half full sort of thing.

Apparently, Mars hsd had an atmo, and running water in the past, after all.  Therefore, it appears already that Mars had a past habitability:  That's what  the phrase, we have "found evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life" means.

The mission has already been a complete success, because it has met its main scientific objectives.  Period.  The rest of the work is a bonus.  You don't like the time frame and the number of people involved?  Don't talk to me about that.  They're the experts.

It still seems that Mars is a dead planet, today.  Mr. Musk's ideas of possible colonization seem more feasible to me, assuming a dead planet.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 07/12/2013 01:16 AM
Curiosity Rover Report (July 11, 2013): Trek to Mount Sharp Begins

Published on Jul 11, 2013
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity heads on the long journey to the mission's main destination, Mount Sharp.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vluaivJqo9w
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/12/2013 01:26 PM
The video is interesting, and something is indeed learned.  The student in that particular classroom only learns what the teacher wants to present.

The teaching is by no means Socratic. 

I'll ask a few questions anyhow:

1) It would be helpful to see a terrain map correlated with the photograph.  Notice how the photos don't have blind spots, but the terrain map is a swiss cheese map.

2) Some discussion and information on the mapping algorithms would be interesting to a few people.  Fo' example: 

There are two images coming into the camera.  How are they scaled? How are the edges found, then converted into x,y,z coordinates into the CAD system?  What is the format of the CAD database?  Is it available in ASCII format for homegrown experimentation?  Can us children try some of this at home, with our Lego rovers?  How?  What topography data is publicly available?

3) Etc.

Outside of the ivory tower, the sneering is understandable, because it is now completely clear that the mission will not look for macroscopic or microscopic life, whether living or dead.  They will literally drive over a sea shell, particularly a sea shell the size of a diatom.

Now that the mission has "already accomplished its main science objective", they are "free" to focus on their carefully planned transit and the associated chemical analyses.  They will make regular reports on this, particularly when they fire off the laser at a target.

Of course, during the public scrutiny and so-called informed consent of the taxpayer at the beginnings of this mission, it was always made very clear that the mission was only about assessing "the biological potential of the landing site, characterize the geology of the landing region, investigate planetary processes that influence habitability, and characterize the broad spectrum of surface radiation".

We knew that all along.  Every last congress critter would tell you that.  It's always been just about the "potential".
 
They never, ever said or implied that we were looking for life on Mars.  It's a dead planet with potential.  We're starting to get that now.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Chris Bergin on 07/12/2013 01:44 PM
Remember this is an update thread.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/12/2013 02:48 PM
Point taken.

I started a splinter thread here:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=32357.msg1073695#msg1073695
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/13/2013 03:56 AM
Curiosity has just driven just under another 28 m.  The next drive (tomorrow or day after?) should take the rover over the km mark. http://curiosityrover.com/tracking/drivelog.html

In the past week they have driven 127 metres.  As they operators gain confidence and experience this rate should go up.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/13/2013 12:21 PM
As the operators gain confidence and experience this rate should go up.

Good.

Practice makes perfect.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 07/13/2013 06:54 PM
In the past week they have driven 127 metres.  As they operators gain confidence and experience this rate should go up.
In the last update, it was mentioned that they will start using auto-nav soon, which should allow them to do 100+ meter drives. Directed drives can only go as far as they have good navcam data, which is around 40 meters.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Dalhousie on 07/13/2013 10:26 PM
In the past week they have driven 127 metres.  As they operators gain confidence and experience this rate should go up.
In the last update, it was mentioned that they will start using auto-nav soon, which should allow them to do 100+ meter drives. Directed drives can only go as far as they have good navcam data, which is around 40 meters.


Yep, the distances match that. 

To cover the 10 km to the base of Mount Sharp and still have time for a for some stops they will need to be doing that fairly soon. Especially as when they get to the dunes they will need to go back to directed driving again.  After that it is the foothills, more slow going and probably lots to see we have not seen before.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 07/18/2013 02:32 AM
07.16.2013
Curiosity Mars Rover Passes Kilometer of Driving

PASADENA, Calif. - The latest drive by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover brought the total distance that the rover has driven on Mars to more than 1 kilometer. One kilometer is about 0.62 mile.
The drive covered about 38 meters (125 feet) and brought the mission's odometry to about 1.029 kilometers (3,376 feet). The drive was completed in the early afternoon of the rover's 335th Martian day, or sol, of work on Mars (July 17). It continued progress in a multi-month trek begun this month toward a mountain destination.

"When I saw that the drive had gone well and passed the kilometer mark, I was really pleased and proud," said rover driver Frank Hartman of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "Hopefully, this is just the first of many kilometers to come."

Yesterday was is halfway through the mission's prime mission of one Martian year. Two weeks ago, Curiosity finished investigating science targets in the Glenelg area, about half a kilometer (500 yards) east of where the one-ton rover landed on Aug. 5, 2012, PDT (Aug. 6, Universal Time). The mission's next major destination is at the lower layers of Mount Sharp, about 8 kilometers (5 miles) southwest of Glenelg.

Mount Sharp, in the middle of Gale Crater, exposes many layers where scientists anticipate finding evidence about how the ancient Martian environment changed and evolved. At targets in the Glenelg area, the rover already accomplished the mission's main science objective by finding evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life.


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1492
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 07/19/2013 02:51 AM
Reports Detail Mars Rover Clues to Atmosphere's Past

07.18.2013

PASADENA, Calif. - A pair of new papers report measurements of the Martian atmosphere's composition by NASA's Curiosity rover, providing evidence about loss of much of Mars' original atmosphere.
Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of laboratory instruments inside the rover has measured the abundances of different gases and different isotopes in several samples of Martian atmosphere. Isotopes are variants of the same chemical element with different atomic weights due to having different numbers of neutrons, such as the most common carbon isotope, carbon-12, and a heavier stable isotope, carbon-13.

SAM checked ratios of heavier to lighter isotopes of carbon and oxygen in the carbon dioxide that makes up most of the planet's atmosphere. Heavy isotopes of carbon and oxygen are both enriched in today's thin Martian atmosphere compared with the proportions in the raw material that formed Mars, as deduced from proportions in the sun and other parts of the solar system. This provides not only supportive evidence for the loss of much of the planet's original atmosphere, but also a clue to how the loss occurred.

"As atmosphere was lost, the signature of the process was embedded in the isotopic ratio," said Paul Mahaffy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. He is the principal investigator for SAM and lead author of one of the two papers about Curiosity results in the July 19 issue of the journal Science.

Other factors also suggest Mars once had a much thicker atmosphere, such as evidence of persistent presence of liquid water on the planet's surface long ago even though the atmosphere is too scant for liquid water to persist on the surface now. The enrichment of heavier isotopes measured in the dominant carbon-dioxide gas points to a process of loss from the top of the atmosphere -- favoring loss of lighter isotopes -- rather than a process of the lower atmosphere interacting with the ground.

Curiosity measured the same pattern in isotopes of hydrogen, as well as carbon and oxygen, consistent with a loss of a substantial fraction of Mars' original atmosphere. Enrichment in heavier isotopes in the Martian atmosphere has previously been measured on Mars and in gas bubbles inside meteorites from Mars. Meteorite measurements indicate much of the atmospheric loss may have occurred during the first billion years of the planet's 4.6-billion-year history. The Curiosity measurements reported this week provide more precise measurements to compare with meteorite studies and with models of atmospheric loss.

The Curiosity measurements do not directly measure the current rate of atmospheric escape, but NASA's next mission to Mars, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN), will do so. "The current pace of the loss is exactly what the MAVEN mission now scheduled to launch in November of this year is designed to determine," Mahaffy said.

The new reports describe analysis of Martian atmosphere samples with two different SAM instruments during the initial 16 weeks of the rover's mission on Mars, which is now in its 50th week. SAM's mass spectrometer and tunable laser spectrometer independently measured virtually identical ratios of carbon-13 to carbon-12. SAM also includes a gas chromatograph and uses all three instruments to analyze rocks and soil, as well as atmosphere.

"Getting the same result with two very different techniques increased our confidence that there's no unknown systematic error underlying the measurements," said Chris Webster of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. He is the lead scientist for the tunable laser spectrometer and the lead author for one of the two papers. "The accuracy in these new measurements improves the basis for understanding the atmosphere's history."

Curiosity landed inside Mars' Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012 Universal Time (on Aug. 5 PDT). The rover this month began a drive of many months from an area where it found evidence for a past environment favorable for microbial life, toward a layered mound, Mount Sharp, where researchers will seek evidence about how the environment changed.


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1496
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: ugordan on 07/19/2013 08:22 AM
Wow, perhaps Mars has been shrinking very slowly whilst losing mass and gravitational pull slowly over time?  Relatavistic speed decay near the speed of light would also make something lose apparent mass.  However we all know that the universe is accelerating outwardly while the Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course with our galaxy.

Maybe Phaeton shrunk and then exploded and formed the astroid belt?

 I am glad that we will never really know what Mars smells like.

???

OR... maybe it's a simple fact that, for a given temperature, lighter atmospheric species have higher velocities and hence a higher fraction of them will exceed the planet's escape velocity than heavier molecules.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/19/2013 01:12 PM
... we all know that the universe is accelerating outwardly while the Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course with our galaxy...

???

OR... maybe it's a simple fact that, for a given temperature, lighter atmospheric species have higher velocities and hence a higher fraction of them will exceed the planet's escape velocity than heavier molecules.

More evidence that the asteroid heist is misprioritized.  With Andromeda headed this way at that rate, shouldn't somebody be doing something about this?  It's a friggin' galaxy!

Seriously, fractional isotopic escape over time is one mechanism to help explain those results.  I imagine there's no helium in Mars' atmo.

If my understanding is correct, Mars could support a heavier atmo even today, were it available.  I understand that there's no magnetosphere, which would explain how, over time, the atmo could have been stripped away.

Still, an impact may have caused a sudden loss of atmo:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2013/jul/18/curiosity-rover-mars

If this happened as long ago as Mr. Webster suggests, then I'd say that Mars has been a dead planet for the last 4.5B years.  Life would not have been all that well established in those early days, and it is certainly the case that life forms can be killed off, as we demonstrate here daily.

If that supposition is valid, then there would be an upper size limit on the type of fossils to look for.  Seashells would be out, plankton in.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: meekGee on 07/19/2013 05:11 PM
... we all know that the universe is accelerating outwardly while the Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course with our galaxy...

???

OR... maybe it's a simple fact that, for a given temperature, lighter atmospheric species have higher velocities and hence a higher fraction of them will exceed the planet's escape velocity than heavier molecules.

More evidence that the asteroid heist is misprioritized.  With Andromeda headed this way at that rate, shouldn't somebody be doing something about this?  It's a friggin' galaxy!


'sactly!!!!!  :)
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Jim on 07/20/2013 02:03 AM
Why do we need to do any space science or even science at all?

I suggest Rigel go to  another thread or forum to make his nonsensical post
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: JohnFornaro on 07/20/2013 12:34 PM
Why do we need to do any space science or even science at all?

I suggest Rigel go to  another thread or forum to make his nonsensical post

Unfortunately, the thread for all of that got locked.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: RigelFive on 07/21/2013 07:12 AM
Nope my bad.  I was trolling for MSL -v- other mission comparisons.  I made a comment that we are seeing repeats of discoveries that go back to the 70s.

Sorry Jim.  Let you enjoy the thread.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 07/21/2013 07:30 PM
Meanwhile, Curiosity appears to have made her first > 100m drive: http://curiosityrover.com/tracking/drivetrack.php?drivenum=64
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 07/23/2013 01:16 AM
^^^I'd heard they were about to try out some upgrades to the auto-navigation software.  Looks like it works pretty good.  And unless I'm mistaken, that's also the first drive that's more than a single straight line.

Two turns.  Were those segments programmed from here, or Curiosity's choice?
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: hop on 07/23/2013 01:29 AM
And unless I'm mistaken, that's also the first drive that's more than a single straight line.
This is definitely not true.
Quote
Two turns.  Were those segments programmed from here, or Curiosity's choice?
Based on http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/news?id=news/sol-339-update-on-curiosity-from-usgs-scientist-ken-herkenhoff-visual-odometry it seems like this was visodom but not autonav. If I've understood correctly, they had better visibility of the terrain than usual, so they could do a 100m directed drive.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Norm38 on 07/23/2013 01:19 PM
^^^  Yes I was mistaken.  Going back to the route maps like this one (http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?act=attach&type=post&id=30554), there are many other drives with turns.  But those were all considerably shorter and easier to pre-plan.  This is an encouraging increase in autonomy.  100m+ drives are going to have to become commonplace to make good time to Mt. Sharp.
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 07/23/2013 11:55 PM
07.23.2013

Curiosity Makes Its Longest One-Day Drive on Mars

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars rover Curiosity drove twice as far on July 21 as on any other day of the mission so far: 109.7 yards (100.3 meters).
The length of the drive took advantage of starting the 340th Martian day, or sol, of the mission from a location with an unusually good view for rover engineers to plan a safe path. In weeks to come, the rover team plans to begin using "autonav" capability for the rover to autonomously navigate a path for itself, which could make such long drives more frequent.

Curiosity is about three weeks into a multi-month trek, from the "Glenelg" area where it worked for the first half of 2013, to an entry point for the mission's major destination: the lower layers of Mount Sharp. The mission's longest one-day drive prior to July 21 was about 54 yards (49 meters), on Sol 50 (Sept. 26, 2012). After completing the longer drive, Curiosity drove 68.2 yards (62.4 meters) on July 23 (Sol 342), bringing the mission's total driving distance so far to 0.81 mile (1.23 kilometers).

The Sol 340 drive included three segments, with turns at the end of the first and second segments. Rover planners used information from stereo imaging by the Navigation Camera (Navcam) on Curiosity's mast, plus images from the telephoto-lens Mast Camera (Mastcam). The drive also used the rover's capability to use imagery taken during the drive to calculate the driving distance, a way to verify that wheels have not been slipping too much while turning.

"What enabled us to drive so far on Sol 340 was starting at a high point and also having Mastcam images giving us the size of rocks so we could be sure they were not hazards," said rover planner Paolo Bellutta of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "We could see for quite a distance, but there was an area straight ahead that was not clearly visible, so we had to find a path around that area."

The rover was facing southwest when the sol began. It turned slightly more to the west before driving and used visual odometry to be sure it drove the intended distance (about 55 yards or 50 meters) before turning back farther southward. The second leg, next turn, and third leg completed the drive without visual odometry, though the rover was using another new capability: to turn on visual odometry autonomously if tilt or other factors exceed predetermined limits.

New software on Curiosity gives it the capability to use visual odometry through a range of temperatures. This was needed because testing this spring indicated the Navcam pair linked to the rover's B-side computer is more sensitive to temperature than anticipated. Without the compensating software, the onboard analysis of stereo images could indicate different distances to the same point, depending on the temperature at which the images are taken. The rover was switched from its A-side computer to the redundant B-side computer on Feb. 28 due to a flash-memory problem -- subsequently resolved -- on the A-side. The Navcam pair linked to the A-side computer shows less variability with temperature than the pair now in use.

"For now, we're using visual odometry mostly for slip-checking," said JPL's Jennifer Trosper, deputy project manager for Curiosity. "We are validating the capability to begin using autonav at different temperatures."

The autonomous navigation capability will enable rover planners to command drives that go beyond the route that they can confirm as safe from previous-sol images. They can tell the rover to use the autonomous capability to choose a safe path for itself beyond that distance.

Curiosity landed at the "Bradbury Landing" location within Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012, EDT and Universal Time (Aug. 5, PDT). From there, the rover drove eastward to the Glenelg area, where it accomplished the mission's major science objective of finding evidence for an ancient wet environment that had conditions favorable for microbial life. The rover's route is now southwestward. At Mount Sharp, in the middle of Gale Crater, scientists anticipate finding evidence about how the ancient Martian environment changed and evolved.


http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1498
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: robertross on 07/25/2013 12:30 AM
07.24.2013

Curiosity Mars Rover Gleams in View from Orbiter

PASADENA, Calif. -- An image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter released today shows NASA's Curiosity Mars rover and the wheel tracks from its landing site to the "Glenelg" area where the rover worked for the first half of 2013.
The image is available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA17080 and http://uahirise.org/ESP_032436_1755.

The orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera captured the scene on June 27, 2013, with the orbiter rolled for an eastward-looking angle rather than straight downward. The afternoon sun illuminated the scene from the western sky, so the lighting was nearly behind the camera. This geometry hides shadows and reveals subtle color variations.

Curiosity that day was examining an outcrop called "Shaler," the rover mission's final science target in the Glenelg area before commencing a many-month trek southwestward to an entry point for the lower layers of Mount Sharp. The rover appears as a bright blue spot in the enhanced coloring of the image.

The image shows two scour marks at the Bradbury Landing site where the Mars Science Laboratory mission's skycrane landing system placed Curiosity onto the ground on Aug. 6, 2012, EDT and Universal Time (Aug. 5, PDT). The scour marks are where the landing system's rockets cleared away reddish surface dust. Visible tracks commencing at the landing site show the path the rover traveled eastward to Glenelg.

HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson. The instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project and Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1499
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: Bubbinski on 08/01/2013 04:36 AM
Curiosity's gone southwest these past few sols, toward the mountain and away from its landing site. 

This page: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/ now has the location up to Sol 349, they've started putting up progress maps and images.  Rove on!
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/01/2013 07:58 PM
Twelve Months in Two Minutes; Curiosity's First Year on Mars

Published on Aug 1, 2013
Here is a rover's eye view of driving, scooping and drilling during Curiosity's first year on Mars, August 2012 through July 2013.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Alq08Poqb0
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/02/2013 04:23 PM
Curiosity Rover: One Year on Mars

Published on Aug 2, 2013
A look at the challenges and achievements of Curiosity's first year on Mars

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt20kTRV-_M
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/02/2013 07:00 PM
News release: 2013-240                                                                 
Aug. 2, 2013

NASA's Curiosity Nearing First Anniversary on Mars

Curiosity Sol 343 Vista With 'Twin Cairns' on Route to Mount Sharp

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-240&cid=release_2013-240

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Curiosity rover will mark one year on Mars next week and has already achieved its main science goal of revealing ancient Mars could have supported life. The mobile laboratory also is guiding designs for future planetary missions.

"Successes of our Curiosity -- that dramatic touchdown a year ago and the science findings since then -- advance us toward further exploration, including sending humans to an asteroid and Mars," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "Wheel tracks now, will lead to boot prints later."

After inspiring millions of people worldwide with its successful landing in a crater on the Red Planet on Aug. 5, 2012, PDT (Aug. 6, 2012, EDT), Curiosity has provided more than 190 gigabits of data; returned more than 36,700 full images and 35,000 thumbnail images; fired more than 75,000 laser shots to investigate the composition of targets; collected and analyzed sample material from two rocks; and driven more than one mile (1.6 kilometers).

MSL Facts

Curiosity team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.,will share remembrances about the dramatic landing night and the overall mission in an event that will air on NASA Television and the agency's website from 7:45 to 9 a.m. PDT (10:45 a.m. to noon EDT) on Tuesday, Aug. 6. Immediately following that program, from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. (noon to 1:30 p.m.), NASA TV will carry a live public event from NASA Headquarters in Washington. That event will feature NASA officials and crew members aboard the International Space Station as they observe the rover anniversary and discuss how its activities and other robotic projects are helping prepare for a human mission to Mars and an asteroid. Social media followers may submit questions on Twitter and Google+ in advance and during the event using the hashtag #askNASA.

Curiosity, which is the size of a car, traveled 764 yards (699 meters) in the past four weeks since leaving a group of science targets where it worked for more than six months. The rover is making its way to the base of Mount Sharp, where it will investigate lower layers of a mountain that rises three miles from the floor of the crater.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft and its unprecedented sky crane landing system placed Curiosity on Mars near the base of Mount Sharp. The mountain has exposed geological layers, including ones identified by Mars orbiters as originating in a wet environment. The rover landed about one mile (1.6 kilometers) from the center of that carefully chosen, 12-mile-long (20-kilometer-long) target area.

Scientists decided first to investigate closer outcrops where the mission quickly found signs of vigorous ancient stream flow. These were the first streambed pebble deposits ever examined up close on Mars.

Evidence of a past environment well suited to support microbial life came within the first eight months of the 23-month primary mission from analysis of the first sample material ever collected by drilling into a rock on Mars.

"We now know Mars offered favorable conditions for microbial life billions of years ago," said the mission's project scientist, John Grotzinger of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "It has been gratifying to succeed, but that has also whetted our appetites to learn more. We hope those enticing layers at Mount Sharp will preserve a broad diversity of other environmental conditions that could have affected habitability."

The mission measured natural radiation levels on the trip to Mars and is monitoring radiation and weather on the surface of Mars, which will be helpful for designing future human missions to the planet. The Curiosity mission also found evidence Mars lost most of its original atmosphere through processes that occurred at the top of the atmosphere. NASA's next mission to Mars, Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN), is being prepared for launch in November to study those processes in the upper atmosphere.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Curiosity mission and built the rover for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

To follow the conversation online about Curiosity's first year on Mars, use hashtag #1YearOnMars or follow @NASA and @MarsCuriosity on Twitter.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/ntv . The events airing on Tuesday also will be carried on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl .

A movie made with Hazard-Avoidance Camera images from Curiosity's first year, titled "Twelve Months in Two Minutes," is available at http://mars.nasa.gov/msl/1yearin2mins .

For more information about the mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

- end -
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: John44 on 08/06/2013 05:21 PM
Curiosity - First Year on Mars
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8421

Curiosity's First Year on Mars: The Path to Future Robotic and Human Exploration
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8422
Title: Re: LIVE: MSL Curiosity Post Landing SOL 1 onwards Update Thread
Post by: catdlr on 08/14/2013 11:11 PM
News release: 2013-250                                                                  Aug. 14, 2013

Mars Rover Opportunity Working at Edge of 'Solander'

Geological Boundary at the Edge of 'Solander Point'

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-250&cid=release_2013-250

Mars Exploration Rover Mission Status Report

PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars rover Opportunity is studying the area of contact between a rock layer formed in acidic wet conditions long ago and an even older one that may be from a more neutral wet environment.

This geologic