Author Topic: ESA - XMM-Newton updates  (Read 15364 times)

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #20 on: 07/03/2012 04:23 PM »
X-raying the beating heart of a newborn star

03 Jul 2012

An international team of scientists has used the world's most powerful X-ray observatories - including ESA's XMM-Newton orbiter - to probe the dusty surroundings of a newborn star and discover some of its innermost secrets. These findings shed new light on one of the most fundamental processes in the Universe, the creation of stars.

 http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50462

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #21 on: 08/06/2012 11:02 AM »
Final cry of disrupted star points to site of oblivion

03 Aug 2012

Astronomers have detected tell-tale luminosity fluctuations in the X-ray signal from a star that was torn apart and devoured by the supermassive black hole at the centre of a distant galaxy. The fluctuations, which have a period of 200 seconds, originate from the innermost stable orbit around the black hole and represent the last signal sent by the debris of the disrupted star before disappearing beyond the black hole's event horizon. The discovery, based on data from ESA's XMM-Newton and the Japan/US Suzaku space observatories, has allowed astronomers to probe the details of matter accretion onto a supermassive black hole in the distant Universe for the first time.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50638

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #22 on: 08/13/2012 04:07 PM »
Aftermath of a stellar explosion

13 August 2012
 
Suspended in time and space, the aftermath of a massive star’s dramatic ending in a supernova explosion is captured by ESA’s XMM-Newton space observatory.

http://www.esa.int/export/esaSC/SEMHODYXP5H_index_0.html

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #23 on: 08/24/2012 07:43 PM »
XMM-Newton Announcement of Opportunity (AO-12)

21 Aug 2012

Proposals are solicited for observations with XMM-Newton in response to the twelfth Announcement of Opportunity, AO-12, issued 21 August 2012. This AO covers the period May 2013 to April 2014 and is open to proposers from all over the world.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50672

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #24 on: 10/14/2012 08:17 PM »
X-raying stellar winds in a high-speed collision
 
12 October 2012

Two massive stars racing in orbit around each other have had their colliding stellar winds X-rayed for the first time, thanks to the combined efforts of ESA’s XMM-Newton and NASA’s Swift space telescopes.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM3H93S18H_index_0.html

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=50904

Offline jacqmans

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #25 on: 11/03/2012 08:18 AM »
Fire burn and cauldron bubble


A giant bubble blown by the massive Wolf-Rayet star HD 50896, the pink star in the centre of the image.

X-ray data from XMM-Newton’s EPIC camera are shown in blue, while optical images were acquired using the Michigan Curtis Schmidt Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) and presented in red (H-alpha) and green (OIII).

The bubble, known as S 308, is about 60 light-years across and is located 5000 light-years away in the constellation of Canis Major.

Credits: ESA, J. Toala & M. Guerrero (IAA-CSIC), Y.-H. Chu & R. Gruendl (UIUC), S. Arthur (CRyA–UNAM), R. Smith (NOAO/CTIO), S. Snowden (NASA/GSFC) and G. Ramos-Larios (IAM)

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #26 on: 09/14/2013 09:48 AM »
Weakling magnetar reveals hidden strength

14 August 2013

Astronomers using ESA's XMM-Newton have measured the magnetic field in a small surface feature of a magnetar - a highly magnetised pulsar - for the first time. Until now, only the dipolar magnetic field of magnetars had been measured. With a new technique, the astronomers have now revealed a strong, localised surface magnetic field in the magnetar that had the lowest measured dipolar field. The discovery yields conclusive proof that magnetars conceal some of the strongest magnetic fields in the Universe.

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/52772-weakling-magnetar-reveals-hidden-strength/

Image credit: ESA/ATG medialab

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #27 on: 10/05/2013 10:38 AM »
Volatile pulsar reveals millisecond missing link

25 September 2013

For the first time, astronomers have caught a pulsar in a crucial transitional phase that explains the origin of the mysterious millisecond pulsars. These pulsars spin much faster than expected for their old age, and astronomers believe their rotation receives a boost as they accrete matter in a binary system. The newly found pulsar swings back and forth between accretion-powered X-ray emission and rotation-driven radio emission, bringing conclusive evidence for their 'rejuvenation'. The discovery was made possible by the coordinated efforts of ESA's two missions that scan the high-energy sky: INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton.

http://sci.esa.int/integral/52866-volatile-pulsar-reveals-millisecond-missing-link/

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #28 on: 12/17/2015 08:23 PM »
Unravelling the Cosmic Web: Survey gives insights into Universe's structure

15 December 2015

Today marks the release of the first papers to result from the XXL survey, the largest survey of galaxy clusters ever undertaken, carried out with ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory. The gargantuan clusters of galaxies surveyed are key features of the large-scale structure of the Universe and to better understand them is to better understand this structure and the circumstances that led to its evolution. The first results from the survey, published in a special issue of Astronomy and Astrophysics, hint at the answers and surprises that are captured in this unique bank of data and reveal the true potential of the survey.

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/57031-unravelling-the-cosmic-web-survey-gives-insights-into-universes-structure/

Image credit: ESA/XMM-Newton/XXL survey consortium

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #29 on: 04/04/2016 01:29 PM »
Andromeda's pulsing neutron star

Andromeda, or M31, is a spiral galaxy similar to our own Milky Way. For the first time, a spinning neutron star has been inferred in XMM-Newton data.

Related article: Andromeda's first spinning neutron star

Image credit:  Andromeda: ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE/J. Fritz, U. Gent/XMM-Newton/EPIC/W. Pietsch, MPE; data: P. Esposito et al. (2016)

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/57662-andromedas-pulsing-neutron-star/


Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #30 on: 12/12/2016 08:41 PM »
Space selfie

Launched on 10 December 1999, XMM-Newton is an X-ray observatory designed to investigate some of the most violent phenomena in the Universe. Sources that emit large amounts of X-rays include remnants of supernova explosions and the surroundings of black holes.

Detecting this energetic radiation is a daunting endeavour, requiring techniques that are greatly different from those used in traditional telescopes. In the case of XMM-Newton, it carries three telescopes of 58 nested mirrors each. These sit at one end of a 7 m-long tube, while at the other end are the scientific instruments at the focus.

The two images in this collage were taken by the two low-resolution monitoring cameras mounted on opposite sides of the focal plane assembly, looking along the pointing direction of the telescope tube towards the service module (see below for an annotated version with explanation).

The cameras were originally used by controllers to check how the solar wings unfolded after launch, and have remained dormant since 2003.

When these images were captured on 14 September 2016 at 06:50 GMT, XMM-Newton was in its 3070th orbit at around 50 000 km altitude and in contact with mission controllers at ESA’s mission control in Darmstadt, Germany, via the antenna at Kourou, French Guiana.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/12/Space_selfie

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - XMM-Newton updates
« Reply #31 on: 02/21/2017 01:39 PM »
The brightest furthest pulsar in the Universe

21 February 2017

ESA's XMM-Newton has found a pulsar – the spinning remains of a once-massive star – that is a thousand times brighter than previously thought possible.

The pulsar is also the most distant of its kind ever detected, with its light travelling 50 million light-years before being detected by XMM-Newton.

http://sci.esa.int/xmm-newton/58817-the-brightest-furthest-pulsar-in-the-universe/

Image credit: ESA/XMM-Newton; NASA/Chandra and SDSS

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