Author Topic: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread  (Read 125315 times)

Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #500 on: 04/09/2013 03:18 AM »
The woman who pretty much killed the UK's space program has died.

Not many will miss her for reasons more than the above.

That was Edward Heath.  She did not reactivate it.

Offline Prospero

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #501 on: 04/09/2013 10:28 AM »
I think the rot against the British space program started a lot sooner than just Maggie's era to be honest. She certainly didn't help, but the UK has suffered from a lack of sufficient political support & vision where space is concerned since the 60's :( At the time there were indeed real financial issues that needed to be addressed and therefore what looked like good reasons to do what they did, but it doesn't change the fact that with a bit more thought, will and the ability to see where things were headed the UK could have been a lot more involved and a lot more advanced where space is concerned. We got out of it all just when the money started to come back in and inevitably it was ESA that benefited Still, no use complaining about the past - better to focus instead on where we could go in the future with the UKSA :)
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Offline Jason Sole

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #502 on: 04/12/2013 04:51 PM »
Good to see the British back on board with Orion money.

Offline bolun

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #503 on: 05/15/2013 12:47 PM »
N° 14–2013: ESA opens its doors in UK

14 May 2013

 David Willetts, UK Minister for Universities and Science, and Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA Director General, today unveiled the Agency’s first UK facility: ECSAT, the European Centre for Space Applications and Telecommunications, located at the Harwell Oxford campus.
 
ECSAT supports activities related to telecommunications, climate change, technology, science and ‘integrated applications’ – the combined use of different space and terrestrial technologies, data and infrastructures to create new everyday applications. The development of innovative public–private partnerships will be emphasised.
 
David Willetts noted: “The UK space industry is increasingly important to growth, contributing over £9 billion to the economy every year and supporting thousands of highly skilled jobs. ESA’s decision to locate its high-tech facility in this country shows that we are creating the right environment for innovation and cutting-edge research.
 
“The centre will benefit from working closely with other space scientists and businesses at Harwell, including the Satellite Applications Catapult being officially launched today.”
 
Despite the current economic climate, the UK space industry has been identified as a growth sector. With 70% of its output being exported it is a major player on the global stage. ECSAT is designed to play a key role in the UK space domain.
 
ESA’s presence in the UK is a clear sign that the Agency is supporting the increased importance given to space by the UK government.
 
Mr Dordain welcomed the UK’s increased interest for investing in space in particular through ESA: “Investing in space is investing in competitiveness and growth, through knowledge, innovation and services. The Harwell Oxford campus is already a unique place of competences and the building up of ESA’s presence in this campus will reinforce both ESA and the campus.”
 
ECSAT will complement ESA’s current world-class capabilities located at ESTEC, the European Space Research and Technology Centre (the Netherlands), ESOC, the European Space Operations Centre (Germany), ESRIN, the European Space Research Institute (Italy), ESAC, the European Space Astronomy Centre (Spain), EAC, the European Astronaut Centre (Germany) and the Redu Centre (Belgium), which, together with Headquarters (France), constitute the main infrastructure of ESA.

 http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/ESA_opens_its_doors_in_UK

Offline bolun

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #504 on: 07/17/2013 08:39 PM »
UK Space Conference showcases buoyant UK space sector

http://www.bis.gov.uk/ukspaceagency/news-and-events/2013/Jul/uk-space-conference-showcases-buoyant-uk-space-sector

British astronaut inspires next generation of scientists

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23339980

Offline Michael Z Freeman

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #505 on: 12/12/2013 02:33 PM »
I think this is the correct thread to present this. I think there is an urgent need now to place NASA and ESA media and educational programming on Freeview here in the UK. There is already a government initiative to encourage the emergence of local TV stations that are broadcast on Freeview. There is evidence that, even though ...

1. The UK provides British astronauts to the ISS (even if its indirectly)

2. Has a large space industry of its own.

3. Is a member and contributing partner to ESA and ESA missions.

... that the message simple is not getting through ...

Quote
"Of those surveyed, 33% were interested in space to 'discover a new planet', and 24% to find life on another planet. When asked to list space exploration organisations 77% listed NASA. Six of those surveyed listed ESA (<0.5%). The data bring starkly to light, despite the Huygens landing on Titan and Mars Express, the lack of awareness of the existence of ESA among a new generation of European school children."

A pilot survey of attitudes to space sciences and exploration among British school children

There is further evidence which I'm looking into ...

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1       Preaching to the converted? An analysis of the UK public for space exploration 
Entradas, M., Miller, S., Peters, H.P.   2013   Public Understanding of Science 22 (3) , pp. 269-286    0
Full Text(opens in a new window) | Show abstract: Subscription required Show abstract  | Related documents

2    Scientific literacy and attitudes towards American space exploration among college undergraduates 
Cook, S.B., Druger, M., Ploutz-Snyder, L.L.   2011   Space Policy 27 (1) , pp. 48-52    2
Full Text(opens in a new window) | Show abstract: Subscription required Show abstract  | Related documents

3    Investigating public space exploration support in the UK 
Entradas, M., Miller, S.   2010   Acta Astronautica 67 (7-8) , pp. 947-953    1
Full Text(opens in a new window) | Show abstract: Subscription required Show abstract  | Related documents

4    Investigating public space exploration interest and support in the UK 
Entradas, M., Miller, S.   2009   60th International Astronautical Congress 2009, IAC 2009 12 , pp. 9529-9537

The UK Space Agency has an educational strategy that, I think, needs to include getting programming on Freeview from NASA and ESA. NASA TV provides a lot of coverage but its not specific to the UK. ESA is currently broadcasting via Liveview but what I've seen is limited.

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"Recommendation 12 proposed that the space industry and the UK Space Agency “should show exemplary and proactive support in championing initiatives aimed at addressing the STEM issues in our schools, colleges, universities and businesses.” The Government accepted this recommendation and the UK Space Agency is now working with industry partners to implement the actions supporting it."
p2

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"Several reviews and much anecdotal evidence demonstrate that few subjects have as much impact as space to inspire interest in the young. For example, a 2009 survey3 that 9% of children now want to become an astronaut"
p2

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"ensure that support and materials on careers in the space industry are easily accessible, including role models (mainly for younger pupils),"
p4

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"Encourage and support the use of space as an inspiring context for learning across all age groups,"
p4

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"Develop and implement wider outreach programmes to improve awareness and engagement with the UK’s space programme"
p4

(my emphasis) UK Space Agency Education, Skills and Outreach Strategy, Using space to inspire learning. Helping to build a skilled workforce.

The initiative to encourage local Freeview stations appears to be in line, in spirit, with a possible channel that contains a mixture of NASA ISS, ESA and other space agencies (seeing as we are working with them) programming. The channel could show docking at the ISS, space walks, other missions like the rovers and solar system satellites as well as interviews with UK space industry personnel and business leaders. Other programming could include educational programs for schools. I'm going to contact the UK Space Agency about this as well as my MP but would like to hear ideas and viewpoints about this. Funding for the channel ("UK Space" ?) might come from UK Space Agency directly, the government, or even as part of BBC expenditure.

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Space exploration is inherently exciting, and as such is an obvious vehicle for inspiring the public in general, and young people in particular, to take an increased interest in science and engineering. This was explicitly recognized in the conclusions of the UK Microgravity Review Panel:

"We have also found considerable public interest in activities in space, particularly those that have human involvement.. This is important in addressing the need for future students to study science and technology subjects and in engaging the public in scientific issues..."
A similar point was made by the RAS Report, which concluded that:

We find compelling evidence that the outreach potential of human space exploration may significantly influence the interests and educational choices of children towards science, engineering and technology.

Case for Space
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Offline Celebrimbor

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #506 on: 07/14/2014 10:02 AM »
A thread on a UK spaceport has popped up in response to an UKSA Spaceport making the headlines:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35163.new#new

Offline bolun

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #507 on: 07/06/2015 02:08 PM »
N° 23–2015: Call for media: First ESA facility in UK - a catalyst for growth

http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/Call_for_media_First_ESA_facility_in_UK_-_a_catalyst_for_growth

Offline bolun

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #508 on: 07/09/2015 07:37 PM »


Offline Star One

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #510 on: 12/02/2016 07:29 PM »
Excellent news as far as the prospects of Tim Peake flying again to the ISS by the looks of it.

Offline Star One

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Re: British Space Agency / UKSA Master Thread
« Reply #511 on: 02/20/2017 06:27 AM »
Space flight is next frontier for UK under new powers

Quote
The Spaceflight Bill will also allow scientists to fly to the edge of space and conduct experiments in zero gravity, which could help develop vaccines and antibiotics, the Department for Transport (DfT) said.
Science minister Jo Johnson said the bill would "cement the UK's position as a world leader in this emerging market".
The first commercial flight from a UK space port could lift off by 2020 under the powers, the DfT said.
Mr Johnson said: "From the launch of Rosetta, the first spacecraft to orbit a comet, to Tim Peake's six months on the International Space Station, the UK's space sector has achieved phenomenal things in orbit and beyond.
"With this week's Spaceflight Bill launch, we will cement the UK's position as a world leader in this emerging market, giving us an opportunity to build on existing strengths in research and innovation."

http://www.aol.co.uk/news/2017/02/20/space-flight-is-next-frontier-for-uk-under-new-powers/

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