Author Topic: Blue Origin working towards making the Cape its Orbital Launch Site  (Read 21540 times)

Offline TrevorMonty

I read recent article about polar launches from Florida. Airforce thinks its possible. Can't remember where I read it but it was only few days ago.


Offline nacnud

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Offline Chasm

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I guess NG will just have to stage a bit early...

Or do a much more pronounced dogleg. They have more spare performance than the rest.

Offline ZachF

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I guess NG will just have to stage a bit early...

Or do a much more pronounced dogleg. They have more spare performance than the rest.

Since they are using wings primarily to slow down couldn't the first stage turn east after separation? Land in the space between Cuba and the Bahamas?


Online Space Ghost 1962

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I guess NG will just have to stage a bit early...

Or do a much more pronounced dogleg. They have more spare performance than the rest.

Since they are using wings primarily to slow down couldn't the first stage turn east after separation? Land in the space between Cuba and the Bahamas?
Not quite.

Not wings but fins. The vehicle strategy is to boost with maximum use of propellants, reserve only for landing downrange. Likely the booster body is the wing, and the fins are used to adjust attitude when the vehicle is in the atmosphere.

The idea is to use atmospheric drag maximally to consume the kinetic energy of the booster rather than boostback/entry burns, so that the reuse losses are at a minimum.

So back to your question - likely they are "doglegging" once offshore to the south, relying on AFTS to allow for enough coastal margin, then flying an optimal trajectory til stage sep - well before encountering the islands.

Then if the vehicle reuse strategy is best employed ... the booster post sep coasts as high and as long as possible to shed momentum with drag, using its attitude to gradually work off energy, and likely veering to avoid its IIP encountering land, where the recovery ship is located.

How close the vehicle is to any islands when it lands on the recovery ship only BO knows.

Likely there is considerable lost payload/margin for such a mission, but NG has a lot to lose to begin with.

Online vaporcobra

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At long last, a vague and unintentional update on LC-36's progress. Did some perspective changes in Photoshop to make it more natural. The original came from NASA Kennedy's Flickr, it was presented during the second National Space Council meeting.
I report on commercial space!

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