Author Topic: European standard interface for satellite servicing  (Read 626 times)

Offline savuporo

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https://nereus.mech.ntua.gr/Documents/pdf_ps/AA17.pdf

Abstract


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Exploitation of space must benefit from the latest advances in robotics. On-orbit servicing is a clear candidate for the application of autonomous rendezvous and docking mechanisms. However, during the last three decades most of the trials took place combining extravehicular activities (EVAs) with telemanipulated robotic arms. The European Space Agency (ESA) considers that grasping and refuelling are promising near-mid-term capabilities that could be performed by servicing spacecraft. Minimal add-ons on spacecraft to enhance their serviceability may protect them for a changing future in which satellite servicing may become mainstream.

ESA aims to conceive and promote standard refuelling provisions that can be installed in present and future European commercial geostationary orbit (GEO) satellite platforms and scientific spacecraft. For this purpose ESA has started the ASSIST activity addressing the analysis, design and validation of internal provisions (such as modifications to fuel, gas, electrical and data architecture to allow servicing) and external provisions (such as integrated berthing fixtures with peripheral electrical, gas, liquid connectors, leak check systems and corresponding optical and radio markers for cooperative rendezvous and docking). This refuelling approach is being agreed with European industry (OHB, Thales Alenia Space) and expected to be consolidated with European commercial operators as a first step to become an international standard; this approach is also being considered for on-orbit servicing spacecraft, such as the SpaceTug, by Airbus DS.

Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline savuporo

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« Last Edit: 03/10/2017 05:51 AM by savuporo »
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline Rei

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Re: European standard interface for satellite servicing
« Reply #2 on: 03/10/2017 09:30 AM »
Very nice to see work on the concept.

Is there an estimate of how much mass they're looking at to add such a dock?  I didn't see one in the paper.  I hope they keep it small...

Offline savuporo

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Re: European standard interface for satellite servicing
« Reply #3 on: 03/10/2017 02:58 PM »
The weight wasnt explicitly stated, but if you look at the setup of the emulator robots:
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The default setup of the CSL Space Emulator is comprised of two robots, the Cepheus (chaser) and the Cassiopeia (target). Both translate using 3 or 4 pairs of thrusters and rotate using either the thrusters or their reaction wheel or both. Cepheus robot has a diameter of 0.5 m and weight adjustable between 18 and 24 kg. Cassiopeia has adjustable side length (0.45 m, 0.6 m and 0.7 m) and adjustable weight between 11 and 24 kg.

The coupling target can't be more than a kilogram or two, at most. Well worth the mass hit.

Also,
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. The design of the internal provision has been performed taken into account the characteristics of current and foreseeable GEO telecommunication satellites. These internal provisions are intending to impose the minimum possible impact on the current architecture of GEO satellite and minimum additional risks in its commissioning. The same applies to the external provision (berthing fixture) of the client GEO satellite, which will have to be designed seeking a minimum impact (in terms of mass, volume and complexity) in order to have a chance to be adopted by the industry, while also being able to provide flexibility in terms of the type of servicing they will enable.
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

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