Author Topic: "Wet" spacesuits.  (Read 1495 times)

Offline carmelo

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"Wet" spacesuits.
« on: 02/20/2017 10:41 PM »
I have a curiosity. You know the EVA training in the swimming pool? My curiosity is, once accomplished the training session, the spacesuits emerged from pool wet and dripping of water. Are these suits dried in some way (and if yes, how?) or simply leave them wet?

And again, the spacesuits that are used in these exercises have a particular overgarnment that dry quickly (like certain swimwear)?

Offline Nilof

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Re: "Wet" spacesuits.
« Reply #1 on: 02/21/2017 11:28 AM »
Are they even actual spacesuits, or just intended to look and feel similar to actual EVA spacesuits?
For a variable Isp spacecraft running at constant power and constant acceleration, the mass ratio is linear in delta-v.   Δv = ve0(MR-1). Or equivalently: Δv = vef PMF. Also, this is energy-optimal for a fixed delta-v and mass ratio.

Offline Anu

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Re: "Wet" spacesuits.
« Reply #2 on: 02/21/2017 12:46 PM »
The ones used at EAC in Cologne are analogue suits, not real EVA suits.

The ones you see in the Moscow hydrolab and at JSC are actual EVA suits (Orlan and EMU). We have an old Orlan that was used at JSC for NBL runs here on display at the National Space Centre.

Offline carmelo

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Re: "Wet" spacesuits.
« Reply #3 on: 02/21/2017 03:28 PM »
And how dry they?

Offline obi-wan

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Re: "Wet" spacesuits.
« Reply #4 on: 02/22/2017 08:28 PM »
The spacesuits used for neutral buoyancy simulation at the JSC NBL and elsewhere are the same EMU design used for flight, although all of the NB components are tagged "Class III/Not for Flight" (which mostly means they don't have the same paperwork trail as flight hardware, although it's still pretty extensive for the NB hardware.) The outer layers are Ortho fabric (as for flight), and the suit gets thoroughly wet down to the pressure bladder. The inside is pressurized with air (actually, a Nitrox mix at JSC) at 4.3 psi above the local ambient, so the inside is dry for the wearer, as it is in space (except that you're still affected by gravity, so if you turn upside down in the suit you fall against the helmet ring and shoulders, and you can feel the blood rushing to your head.)

Don't know the details of the NBL, but back at the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator at NASA Marshall they had a "drying closet", where the suit components were put after a run at a slightly elevated temperature to dry off more quickly, usually in time for a run the next day. The lower torso assembly was put on a rack upside down and dry air was blown into the feet and legs to dry out the inside (you may be wearing a liquid cooling garment, but there's still a lot of sweating going on inside the suit most of the time.)

Offline carmelo

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Re: "Wet" spacesuits.
« Reply #5 on: 02/23/2017 10:18 PM »
Many thanks Obi!

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