Author Topic: New Horizons updates  (Read 123717 times)

Offline MKremer

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #20 on: 10/09/2006 09:12 PM »
Considering how far away Jupiter was, those LORRI images are virtually an order of magnitude better than what Cassini took at less than half that distance with its main camera.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #21 on: 03/01/2007 04:21 PM »
Hubble Monitors Jupiter in Support of the New Horizons Flyby
 

 NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has recently taken images of Jupiter in support of the New Horizons Mission. The images were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys. Hubble will continue to photograph Jupiter, as well as its volcanically active moon, Io, over the next month as the New Horizons spacecraft flies past Jupiter. New Horizons is en route to Pluto, and made its closest approach to Jupiter on February 28, 2007. Through combined remote imaging by Hubble and in situ measurements by New Horizons, the two missions will enhance each other scientifically, allowing scientists to learn more about the Jovian atmosphere, the aurorae, and the charged-particle environment of Jupiter and its interaction with the solar wind.

See the full release:
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2007/11/


 
 

Offline jacqmans

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #22 on: 03/01/2007 04:22 PM »
RELEASE: 07-55

NASA SPACECRAFT GETS BOOST FROM JUPITER FOR PLUTO ENCOUNTER

LAUREL, Md. - NASA's New Horizons spacecraft successfully completed a
flyby of Jupiter early this morning, using the massive planet's
gravity to pick up speed for its 3-billion mile voyage to Pluto and
the unexplored Kuiper Belt region beyond.

"We're on our way to Pluto," said New Horizons Mission Operations
Manager Alice Bowman of Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics
Laboratory (APL), Laurel, Md. "The swingby was a success; the
spacecraft is on course and performed just as we expected."

New Horizons came within 1.4 million miles of Jupiter at 12:43 a.m.
EST, placing the spacecraft on target to reach the Pluto system in
July 2015. During closest approach, the spacecraft could not
communicate with Earth, but gathered science data on the giant
planet, its moons and atmosphere.

At 11:55 a.m. EST mission operators at APL established contact
through
NASA's Deep Space Network and confirmed New Horizons' health and
status.

The fastest spacecraft ever launched, New Horizons is gaining nearly
9,000 mph from Jupiter's gravity - accelerating to more than 52,000
mph. The spacecraft has covered approximately 500 million miles since
its launch in January 2006 and reached Jupiter faster than seven
previous spacecraft to visit the solar system's largest planet. New
Horizons raced through a target just 500 miles across, the equivalent
of a skeet shooter in Washington hitting a target in Baltimore on the
first try.

New Horizons has been running through an intense six-month long
systems check that will include more than 700 science observations of
the Jupiter system by the end of June. More than half of those
observations are taking place this week, including scans of Jupiter's
turbulent atmosphere, measurements of its magnetic cocoon, surveys of
its delicate rings, maps of the composition and topography of the
large moons Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, and a detailed look at
volcanic activity on Io.

"We designed the entire Jupiter encounter to be a tough test for the
mission team and our spacecraft, and we're passing the test," says
New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern from the Southwest
Research Institute in Boulder, Colo. "We're not only learning what we
can expect from the spacecraft when we visit Pluto in eight years,
we're already getting some stunning science results at Jupiter - and
there's more to come."

While much of the close-in science data will be sent back to Earth
during the coming weeks, the team also downloaded a sampling of
images to verify New Horizons' performance.

The outbound leg of New Horizons' journey includes the first-ever
trip
down the long "tail" of Jupiter's magnetosphere, a wide stream of
charged particles that extends more than 100 million miles beyond the
planet. Amateur backyard telescopes, the giant Keck telescope in
Hawaii, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory
and other ground and space-based telescopes are turning to Jupiter as
New Horizons flies by, ready to provide global context to the
close-up data New Horizons gathers.

New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers Program of
medium-class spacecraft exploration projects. The Applied Physics
Laboratory, Laurel, Md., manages the mission for NASA's Science
Mission Directorate, Washington. The mission team also includes
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; NASA's Jet
Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; the U.S. Department of
Energy, Washington; Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colo.; and
several corporations and university partners.

For the latest news and images from the New Horizons mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/newhorizons

Offline jacqmans

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #23 on: 03/01/2007 04:23 PM »
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/missionPhotos/pages/022807_1.html

[Ganymede Image]

This is New Horizons' best image of Ganymede, Jupiter's largest moon,
taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI)
camera at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from a range of 3.5
million kilometers (2.2 million miles). The longitude of the disk
center is 38 degrees West and the image scale is 17 kilometers
(11 miles) per pixel. Dark patches of ancient terrain are broken
up by swaths of brighter, younger material, and the entire icy
surface is peppered by more recent impact craters that have
splashed fresh, bright ice across the surface.

With a diameter of 5,268 kilometers (3.273 miles), Ganymede is
the largest satellite in the solar system.

This is one of a handful of Jupiter system images already returned
by New Horizons during its close approach to Jupiter. Most of
the data being gathered by the spacecraft are stored onboard and
will be downlinked to Earth during March and April 2007.

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/
Southwest Research Institute

Offline eeergo

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #24 on: 03/12/2007 12:05 PM »

Fantastic new movie made by New Horizons data, showing the giant planet rotating:

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0703/jupiterspin_newhorizons.mpg

Also, for news about the findings by NH in the Jupiter flyby (Stern's said periodic releases are expected frequently for the next 2-3 months) at http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/index.php. Among them, this nice photo of Jupiter's rings: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/missionPhotos/pages/030907.html

They're being a bit slow posting updates lately, and the released images resolution is quite crappy, but maybe it's because they've got so much data to analyse.

-DaviD-

Offline Danderman

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #25 on: 03/13/2007 07:07 PM »
How does the NH data compare with the Galileo data provided over many years by that spacecraft?

Offline rdale

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #26 on: 03/13/2007 07:18 PM »
That's a pretty wide-open question, anything more specific?

Offline Danderman

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #27 on: 03/13/2007 10:58 PM »
Quote
rdale - 13/3/2007  1:18 PM

That's a pretty wide-open question, anything more specific?

What instruments on NH are different than on Galileo (or offer better data)?


Offline Kayla

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #28 on: 03/17/2007 12:14 PM »
New Horizons is just starting to show the incredible return that these robotic missions can provide for reasonable investments, ~$700M in the case of NH.  Spirit & Discovery are 2 additional recent prime examples.  In the next few years LRO/LCROS, MSL, SDO and JUNO will continue demonstrating what a bonanza of science, information and ongoing popular appeal these medium cost robotic missions can provide.  Sadly, NASA has scrapped the center piece of the robotic lunar exploration, LPRP (Lunar Precursor Robotic Program), due to funding short falls in the ARES/ORION program.  LPRP would have truly set the stage for returning people to the moon to work.

Offline Jim

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #29 on: 03/17/2007 12:50 PM »
Quote
Danderman - 13/3/2007  7:58 AM

Quote
rdale - 13/3/2007  1:18 PM

That's a pretty wide-open question, anything more specific?

What instruments on NH are different than on Galileo (or offer better data)?


All are different, can't really compare them.  One is an orbiter and the other is a flyby spacecraft

Offline Antares

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #30 on: 03/17/2007 03:17 PM »
Quote
Kayla - 17/3/2007  9:14 AM
Sadly, NASA has scrapped the center piece of the robotic lunar exploration, LPRP (Lunar Precursor Robotic Program), due to funding short falls in the ARES/ORION program.  LPRP would have truly set the stage for returning people to the moon to work.
There's a silver lining to this.  Hopefully when LPRP comes back it will reappear at a Science Center (ARC preferably, GSFC or JPL).  It was only moved to MSFC, whose program management skill is iffy, because of Senator Shelby.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #31 on: 04/25/2007 04:55 PM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M07-41

NASA SCIENCE UPDATE TO DISCUSS NEW DATA FROM JUPITER FLYBY

WASHINGTON - A NASA Science Update at 1 p.m. EDT Tuesday, May 1, will
discuss new views of the Jupiter system. The Pluto-bound New Horizons
spacecraft is returning these images as it flies past the solar
system's largest planet during the initial stages of a planned
six-month encounter. The update will take place in the NASA
Headquarters auditorium at 300 E St., S.W., Washington. The update
will air live on NASA Television and be streamed at www.nasa.gov.

New Horizons is using Jupiter's gravity to boost its speed toward the
outer solar system while training its cameras and sensors on the
giant planet and its moons.

Briefing participants are:
-- Alan Stern, NASA associate administrator, Science Mission
Directorate, and New Horizons principal investigator, Headquarters,
Washington
-- Jeff Moore, New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team lead, Ames
Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
-- John Spencer, New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team deputy
lead, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colo.
-- Hal Weaver, New Horizons project scientist, Johns Hopkins
University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.

Reporters at participating NASA centers will be able to ask questions.
For more information about NASA TV, streaming video, downlink and
schedule information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

Offline Argosy

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #32 on: 04/26/2007 11:47 AM »
Are there any indications of the so-called Pioneer effect/anomally? I remember, I may be wrong, that it all started around Saturn on the Pioneers?

Offline Jim

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #33 on: 04/26/2007 11:55 AM »
Quote
Argosy - 26/4/2007  7:47 AM

Are there any indications of the so-called Pioneer effect/anomally? I remember, I may be wrong, that it all started around Saturn on the Pioneers?

That was much further out of the solar system

Offline jacqmans

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #34 on: 05/01/2007 07:24 PM »
RELEASE: 07-95

PLUTO-BOUND NEW HORIZONS PROVIDES NEW LOOK AT JUPITER SYSTEM

WASHINGTON - NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has provided new data on
the Jupiter system, stunning scientists with never-before-seen
perspectives of the giant planet's atmosphere, rings, moons and
magnetosphere.

These new views include the closest look yet at the Earth-sized
"Little Red Spot" storm churning materials through Jupiter's cloud
tops; detailed images of small satellites herding dust and boulders
through Jupiter's faint rings; and of volcanic eruptions and circular
grooves on the planet's largest moons.

New Horizons came to within 1.4 million miles of Jupiter on Feb. 28,
using the planet's gravity to trim three years from its travel time
to Pluto. For several weeks before and after this closest approach,
the piano-sized robotic probe trained its seven cameras and sensors
on Jupiter and its four largest moons, storing data from nearly 700
observations on its digital recorders and gradually sending that
information back to Earth. About 70 percent of the expected 34
gigabits of data has come back so far, radioed to NASA's largest
antennas over more than 600 million miles. This activity confirmed
the successful testing of the instruments and operating software the
spacecraft will use at Pluto.

"Aside from setting up our 2015 arrival at Pluto, the Jupiter flyby
was a stress test of our spacecraft and team, and both passed with
very high marks," said Science Mission Directorate Associate
Administrator and New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern,
NASA Headquarters, Washington. "We'll be analyzing this data for
months to come; we have collected spectacular scientific products as
well as evocative images."

Images include the first close-up scans of the Little Red Spot,
Jupiter's second-largest storm, which formed when three smaller
storms merged during the past decade. The storm, about half the size
of Jupiter's larger Great Red Spot and about 70 percent of Earth's
diameter, began turning red about a year before New Horizons flew
past it. Scientists will search for clues about how these systems
form and why they change colors in their close observations of
materials spinning within and around the nascent storm.

"This is our best look ever of a storm like this in its infancy," said
Hal Weaver, New Horizons project scientist from the Johns Hopkins
University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), Laurel, Md. APL built
and operates the New Horizons spacecraft. "Combined with data from
telescopes on and around Earth taken at the same time New Horizons
sped past Jupiter, we're getting an incredible look at the dynamics
of weather on giant planets."

Under a range of lighting and viewing angles, New Horizons also
grabbed the clearest images ever of the tenuous Jovian ring system.
In them, scientists spotted a series of unexpected arcs and clumps of
dust, indicative of a recent impact into the ring by a small object.
Movies made from New Horizons images also provide an unprecedented
look at ring dynamics, with the tiny inner moons Metis and Adrastea
appearing to shepherd the materials around the rings.

"We're starting to see that rings can evolve rapidly, with changes
detectable during weeks and months," said Jeff Moore, New Horizons
Jupiter Encounter science team lead from NASA Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, Calif. "We've seen similar phenomena in the rings of
Saturn."

Of Jupiter's four largest moons, the team focused much attention on
volcanic Io, the most geologically active body in the solar system.
New Horizons' cameras captured pockets of bright, glowing lava
scattered across the surface; dozens of small, glowing spots of gas;
and several fortuitous views of a sunlit umbrella-shaped dust plume
rising 200 miles into space from the volcano Tvashtar, the best
images yet of a giant eruption from the tortured volcanic moon.

The timing and location of the spacecraft's trajectory also allowed it
to spy many of the mysterious, circular troughs carved onto the icy
moon Europa. Data on the size, depth and distribution of these
troughs, discovered by the Jupiter-orbiting Galileo mission, will
help scientists determine the thickness of the ice shell that covers
Europa's global ocean.

Already the fastest spacecraft ever launched, New Horizons reached
Jupiter 13 months after lifting off from Cape Canaveral Air Force
Station, Fla., in January 2006. The flyby added 9,000 miles per hour,
pushing New Horizons past 50,000 miles per hour and setting up a
flight by Pluto in July 2015.

The number of observations at Jupiter was twice that of those planned
at Pluto. New Horizons made most of these observations during the
spacecraft's closest approach to the planet, which was guided by more
than 40,000 separate commands in the onboard computer.

"We can run simulations and take test images of stars, and learn that
things would probably work fine at Pluto," said John Spencer, deputy
lead of the New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team, Southwest
Research Institute, Boulder, Colo. "But having a planet to look at
and lots of data to dig into tells us that the spacecraft and team
can do all these amazing things. We might not have explored the full
capabilities of the spacecraft if we didn't have this real planetary
flyby to push the system and get our imaginations going."

More data are to come, as New Horizons completes its unprecedented
flight down Jupiter's long magnetotail, where it will analyze the
intensities of sun-charged particles that flow hundreds of millions
of miles beyond the giant planet.

New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers Program of
medium-class spacecraft exploration projects. Stern leads the mission
and science team as principal investigator; APL manages the mission
for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. The mission team also
includes Ball Aerospace Corp., Boulder, Colo; the Boeing Company,
Chicago; NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.;NASA's
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Stanford University,
Palo Alto, Calif.; KinetX, Inc., Simi Valley, Calif.; Lockheed Martin
Corp.; Denver; University of Colorado, Boulder; the U.S. Department
of Energy, Washington; and a number of other firms, NASA centers, and
university partners.

To view the new images visit:

www.nasa.gov/newhorizons


-end-

Offline John44

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #35 on: 05/01/2007 08:06 PM »
video - NASA Science Update Pluto New Horizons: A New View of Jup
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1954&Itemid=2

Offline 02hurnella

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #36 on: 05/22/2007 07:37 PM »
Yeah is NH designed to test the Pioneer anomaly. Shaking up our knowledge of physics (or confirming it) would be pretty good going fo a mid sized mission.

Offline MKremer

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #37 on: 05/22/2007 08:11 PM »
Quote
02hurnella - 22/5/2007  2:37 PM

Yeah is NH designed to test the Pioneer anomaly. Shaking up our knowledge of physics (or confirming it) would be pretty good going fo a mid sized mission.
Pardon?
NH was designed for Pluto/Charon and future possible Kuiper belt objects, period. I seriously doubt Dr. Stern even had a passing thought about any 'Pioneer anomoly' research designing the craft/experiments/mission.
(not to say other scientists might use NH data/transmissions for that research in future years, but that wasn't a part of the PI's spacecraft plans or mission)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #38 on: 10/09/2007 05:31 PM »
RELEASE: 07-221

NASA SPACECRAFT SEES CHANGES IN JUPITER SYSTEM

LAUREL, Md. - NASA's New Horizons spacecraft provided a new bird's-eye
view of the dynamic Jupiter system as it traveled through the
planet's orbit on Feb. 28.

New Horizons used Jupiter's gravity to boost its speed and shave three
years off its trip to Pluto. Although the eighth spacecraft to visit
Jupiter, New Horizons' combination of trajectory, timing and
technology allowed it to explore details never before observed.

The spacecraft revealed lightning near the Jupiter's poles, the life
cycle of fresh ammonia clouds, boulder-size clumps speeding through
the planet's faint rings, the structure inside volcanic eruptions on
its moon Io, and the path of charged particles traversing the
previously unexplored length of the planet's long, magnetic tail.

"The Jupiter encounter was successful beyond our wildest dreams," said
Alan Stern, principal investigator for the New Horizons mission, NASA
Headquarters, Washington. "Not only did it prove our spacecraft and
put it on course to reach Pluto in 2015, it was a chance for us to
take sophisticated instruments to places in the Jovian system where
other spacecraft could not go. It returned important data that adds
tremendously to our understanding of the solar system's largest
planet and its moons, rings and atmosphere."

The New Horizons team presented its latest, most detailed analyses of
those data Tuesday at the American Astronomical Society's Division
for Planetary Sciences meeting in Orlando, Fla. Results also will
appear in a special section of the Oct. 12 issue of the journal
Science.

From January through June, New Horizons' seven science instruments
made more than 700 separate observations of the Jovian system.
Jupiter's weather was high on the list, as New Horizons' visible
light, infrared and ultraviolet remote-sensing instruments probed the
planet's atmosphere for data on cloud structure and composition.

Instruments saw clouds form from ammonia welling up from the lower
atmosphere. Heat-induced lighting strikes in the polar regions also
were observed. This was the first polar lighting ever seen beyond
Earth, demonstrating that heat moves through water clouds at
virtually all latitudes across Jupiter.

New Horizons made the most-detailed size and speed measurements yet of
"waves" that run the width of the planet and indicate violent storm
activity below. Additionally, New Horizons snapped the first close-up
images of the Little Red Spot, gathering new information on storm
dynamics. The spot is a nascent storm about half the size of
Jupiter's larger Great Red Spot, or about 70 percent of Earth's
diameter.

The spacecraft captured the clearest images to date of the tenuous
Jovian ring system, showing clumps of debris that may indicate a
recent impact inside the rings or some more exotic phenomenon. Movies
made from New Horizons images offer an unprecedented look at ring
dynamics, showing the tiny inner moons Metis and Adrastea shepherding
the materials around the rings. A search for smaller moons inside the
rings, and possible new sources of the dusty material, found no
bodies wider than a mile.

The mission's investigations of Jupiter's four largest moons focused
on Io, the closest to Jupiter, which has active volcanoes that blast
tons of material into the Jovian magnetosphere and beyond. New
Horizons spied 11 different volcanic plumes of varying size, three of
which were seen for the first time. One, a spectacular 200-mile-high
eruption rising above the volcano Tvashtar, provided a unique
opportunity to trace plume structure and motion. New Horizons' global
map of Io's surface confirms the moon's status as the solar system's
most active body, showing more than 20 geological changes since the
Galileo Jupiter orbiter provided the last close-up look in 2001.

New Horizons' flight down Jupiter's magnetic tail offered a look at
the vast region dominated by the planet's strong magnetic field.
Specifically observing the fluxes of charged particles that flow
hundreds of millions of miles beyond the giant planet, spacecraft
particle detectors saw evidence that tons of material from Io's
volcanoes move down the tail in large, dense, slow-moving blobs.

Designed, built and operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied
Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., New Horizons lifted off in January
2006. The fastest spacecraft ever launched, it reached Jupiter in
just 13 months. New Horizons is now approximately halfway between the
orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, more than 743 million miles from Earth.
It will fly past Pluto and its moons in July 2015, then head deeper
into the Kuiper belt of icy, rocky objects on the planetary frontier.
New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers Program of
medium-class spacecraft exploration projects.

For more details on the findings, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/newhorizons

Offline swervin irvin

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Re: New Horizons update
« Reply #39 on: 01/30/2008 02:29 AM »
i know this is shameless bragging, as part of the redmond rocket team (aerojet)

i helped assemble the reaction control system onto that cool piano sort of chassis

what a thrill to watch her screaming out into the deep