Author Topic: NASA considers alternatives to its Orion spacecraft  (Read 15312 times)

Offline Rocket Science

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Re: NASA considers alternatives to its Orion spacecraft
« Reply #100 on: 11/21/2016 12:27 PM »
It's hard to rationalize to taxpayers a lot money being spent for little accomplishment...
« Last Edit: 11/22/2016 03:21 PM by Rocket Science »
“All engineering experiments generate valuable data, the failures are the ones that yield the most”
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Offline Oli

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Re: NASA considers alternatives to its Orion spacecraft
« Reply #101 on: 11/21/2016 01:16 PM »

This footnote is interesting:

Quote
The Design, Development, Test and Evaluation phase of a flight vehicle program typically culminates with development and production of the first vehicle.  For the Orion Program, this phase involves the development of two vehicles and will culminate with development and production of the vehicle that will be used for EM-2. The Production and Operations phase covers vehicles produced for subsequent missions and the Capability Enhancements phase, which includes a relatively small amount of reserve funds, makes modifications to those vehicles.

EM-2 is in 2023 and according to this part of DDTE. So the few Orion flights from then to 2030 come at a cost of $7.8bn. Even if there will be one flight per year from 2024 onwards that's $1.1bn per flight. Significantly more than the HEFT unit cost estimate ($840m).

Online jgoldader

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Re: NASA considers alternatives to its Orion spacecraft
« Reply #102 on: 11/22/2016 11:51 AM »
Is the ECLSS the long pole now for Orion?
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Offline woods170

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Re: NASA considers alternatives to its Orion spacecraft
« Reply #103 on: 11/22/2016 03:13 PM »
Is the ECLSS the long pole now for Orion?
Not for EM-1, given that only a very basic ECLSS set-up is required for that unmanned mission. It is however one of the current long poles for EM-2.

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