Author Topic: ESA’s Ministerial - December 1-2, 2016 in Lucerne, Switzerland  (Read 4618 times)

Offline eeergo

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On Monday, there will be an interview (posted online on Tuesday) with Jan Woerner providing an overview of the upcoming Council.

http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/Call_for_Media_Press_briefing_on_Ministerial_Council_CM16
-DaviD-

Offline bolun

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Offline jacqmans

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Press Release
N°42-2016

Paris, 14 November

Media backgrounder: ESA’s Ministerial 2016 in Lucerne

The Ministers in charge of space within the 22 ESA Member States and Canada gather typically every three years to set the Agency’s strategy and policies. During these ESA Council meetings at Ministerial Level, decisions are taken on the main direction
for the coming years and on the additional budget for the future. Ministers agree to start new programmes or eventually to bring them to an end. This time, the ‘space ministers’ will meet on 1–2 December in Lucerne, Switzerland.

The meeting this year will define ESA’ objectives based on the vision of a United Space in Europe in the era of Space 4.0. 

United Space in Europe
European spirit, identity and cohesion are the overarching aspects for Europe to achieve the best of outcomes for its states and citizens in space and for a globally successful European space sector. 

ESA’s Ministerial Council takes place at a time when common goals for space have been defined at European level: ESA and the EU issued a joint statement on 26 October on a “Shared Vision and Goals for the Future of Europe in Space”, as part of a reinforced
cooperation for the future. 
ESA and EC define specific objectives under this common understanding. EC published its part on 26 October; ESA will decide its part in its role as the European Space Agency during the Ministerial Council, based on the ESA Convention and the anticipated
shift of paradigms in space: Space 4.0. 

United Space in Europe describes the intensive cooperation of different European entities for the sake of a strengthening of Europe. With this strengthened European cooperation in space, this Ministerial Council will further ESA’s breadth and strength
of action to cover its mandate as laid out in the ESA Convention through enhanced partnership with its Member States, with other institutional actors and with space actors worldwide.   

Space 4.0
The conference takes place in the advent of the Space 4.0 era, a time when space is evolving from being the preserve of the governments of a few spacefaring nations to a situation in which there is the increased number of diverse space actors around
the world, including the emergence of private companies, participation with academia, industry and citizens, digitalisation and global interaction. 

Space 4.0 represents the evolution of the space sector into a new era, characterised by a new playing field. This era is unfolding through interaction between governments, private sector, society and politics. Space 4.0 is analogous to, and is intertwined
with, Industry 4.0, which is considered as the unfolding fourth industrial revolution of manufacturing and services.   

To meet the challenges and to proactively develop the different aspects of Space 4.0, the European space sector can become globally competitive only by fully integrating into European society and economy. This requires a sustainable space sector closely
connected with the fabric of society and economy. For this to happen, space must be safe, secure and easily and readily accessible, and built on a foundation of excellence in science and technology – broadly and continuously over time.   

ESA will table proposals at the meeting to meet the common European goals for space in this exciting and challenging new era. 

The proposed global investment to be decided at the meeting amounts to about €11 billion.

The goals defined in the joint ESA–EC statement are taken into account by concrete proposals for the Ministerial Council:

Goal: maximise the integration of space into European society and economy
Target amount: €2.5 billion 

Concerted efforts ultimately leading to the full integration of space into European society and economy are about addressing and contributing to resolving societal challenges, about the link between the space sector and other sectors, and about closing
the gaps between space and users through data and services, and between space and citizens by informing, inspiring and interacting.

ESA will continue to address societal challenges thus also contributing to global Sustainable Development Goals associated with food, climate change and water reserves by:

•continuing to develop missions – namely Biomass, FLEX, Earth Explorer-9 & 10 and an additional ‘opportunity’ mission – within the Earth Observation Envelope Programme in its fifth period (EOEP-5), and in addition to Altius (an Earth Watch element
of the programme), specifically investigating stratospheric ozone profiles;
•improving data preservation and accessibility of all ESA science heritage data assets through the Long-Term Data Preservation programme (as part of the mandatory activities), and data exploitation schemes by extending and improving GMECV+ Essential
Climate Variables (Earth Watch) to further support climate science and monitoring for policy-making;
•investing in the ISS, including safe and efficient operation of Europe’s contributions, the first mission of the European Service Module for the NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, fulfilling Europe’s commitments until 2020 under current barter
arrangements with NASA, and the manufacture of the second flight model as a first contribution to a post-2020 barter;
•guaranteeing international cooperation in Earth observation and coordinated access to non-ESA Earth observation missions for Europe for, for example, disaster management and migration through Earthnet (as part of the mandatory activities).

With these programmes and activities ESA will continue to push the frontiers of knowledge and advance science, technology and applications. Through the Education Programme, this knowledge will be passed on to younger and future generations, guaranteeing
continuity. Furthermore, such knowledge is also important for developing business opportunities, through, for example, applications, thus leading to economic growth. ESA will foster this by:

•enabling a timely and efficient access to space, in order to demonstrate and validate innovative technologies, systems, services and applications through Pioneer, which aims at supporting the emergence of commercial entities interested in becoming
one-stop-shop service providers for proof of concept missions;
•promoting innovative services through existing and new user communities Integrated Application Promotion (IAP, in ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems – ARTES – programme) for the further integration of the individual areas into European
society and economy (Earth observation, navigation and telecommunications), and strengthening the links among the areas and actors.


Goal: foster a globally competitive European space sector
Target amount: €1.5 billion 

Concerted measures that foster the European space sector into becoming wholly competitive in the global market are also about enabling and implementing new cooperation methods between traditional, new and emerging actors, about new working methods
in line with Industry 4.0 and about pushing for a self-sustaining and commercially competitive European space industrial base open and easily accessible to other European sectors, which it helps to make profitable.

This calls for broadening the base of industrial actors through the emergence of new players, including small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), calls for implementing public–private partnerships (PPPs) in areas in which these have to date seen
only public financing, calls for clearer and stronger connections between the space and non-space sectors to allow for spin-ins and –offs, and for complementary activities.

ESA intends to address all of the above by:
•supporting the growth and networking of SMEs, through the SME Initiative, which helps to widen the base of actors and increase the dynamic nature of the space field;
•extending PPPs to the Earth observation area through InCubed (Earth Watch) to stimulate Europe’s Earth observation industry to develop innovative technologies and services for commercialisation in the new Space 4.0 environment;
•stimulating the first European commercial partnership(s) in space exploration, drawing on the group of innovative ideas already proposed by industry through commercial partnerships within the European Exploration Envelope Programme (E3P);
•coordinating space technology planning of ESA, EU and Member States with industry and other stakeholders through the establishment of technology roadmaps through technology harmonisation;
•providing support to the establishment and maintenance of standards for the space sector through standardisation;
•preparing future initiatives and developing competitive technologies and products for telecommunication and thus directly supporting industry competitiveness through the Future Preparation and Core Competitiveness Elements;
•providing extended geographical coverage and service enhancement of the European Data Relay Satellite System (EDRS), currently under development and opening new market opportunities for optical communication technologies, through the continuation
of the EDRS-GlobeNet programme;
•developing optical communication technologies to address future markets with ScyLight, which will also address quantum cryptography and other new applications;
•supplying a validated satellite-based communication solution for the European Air Traffic Management System, through Iris;
•supporting and enabling the development, qualification and demonstration in orbit of next-generation platform lines, allowing European prime satellite integrators already established in the 
3–6 tonne launch mass segment to address future satellite operators’ needs through Neosat;
•supporting the development, launch and validation in orbit of a satellite system based on an innovative geostationary platform in the 3 tonne launch mass range, using all-electric propulsion for transfer to geostationary orbit and for stationkeeping,
through Electra;
•supporting the design and development of the innovative elements that will contribute to an optimised delivery of future mobile satellite communication services, through ICE, Inmarsat Communications Evolution project;
•supporting the development, launch and validation in orbit of an innovative Ka- and V-band satellite system, through Lynxsat;
•supporting European satellite ground segment industry to develop, validate and roll out innovative ground segment solutions, through Aidan;
•supporting the development of streamlined microsatellites towards reduced recurring cost for serial production by supporting space-based tracking of seafaring vessels beyond coastal areas that are equipped with AIS (Automatic Identification System)
tracking devices through SAT-AIS missions and other applications and by addressing other opportunities offered by small LEO constellations high-performance ship detection capabilities;
•facilitating the transfer of technologies and knowhow developed at ESA into diverse non-space fields (spin-off) and supporting the local Business Incubator Centres in Member States, through the Technology Transfer and Incubation Programme (TTP); 
•preparing Europe for independent routine access and return from LEO with a reusable system able to transport payloads for several different applications through Space Rider (based on Vega C), and activities involving Dream Chaser (based on Ariane
64);
•providing low-cost launch services for light and small satellites based on Ariane 6 and Vega with the Light satellite, Low-cost Launch (LLL) initiative.

Goal: ensure European autonomy in accessing and using space in a safe and secure environment
Target amount: €2.5 billion 

Europe can make the most of space by recognising that it is a critical infrastructure, the access to, and use and protection of which are fundamental for both its success and that of critical infrastructure that depend upon space assets and services.

In addition to developing the family of launchers Ariane 62/64 and Vega C, ESA will continue to ensure European autonomy in accessing space by:
•adopting the CSG Resolution for the period 2017–21 which guarantees a fully operational space centre for all European launchers;
•continuing the Launchers Exploitation Accompaniment Programme (LEAP) and extending by the period 2017–19 to cover costs linked to the support to the exploitation of Ariane 5 and Vega.

ESA will invest in a safe and secure space environment by:
•investing in Space Traffic Management consisting of:
–Space Situational Awareness activities aimed at contributing to a European capability to monitor the space environment for hazards, both natural and man-made that could affect assets in orbit or populations and infrastructure on ground. Activities
include the establishment of a network of Near-Earth Object (NEO) survey telescopes, the deployment of new applications in the NEO Coordination Centre as well as technology developments and networking of Space Surveillance and Tracking ground- and
space-based assets; 
–augmenting capabilities for monitoring of space weather with the development of a Space Weather mission to a Lagrange point (L1 or L5), including pre-development activities;   
–preparing the first steps towards protection against near-Earth objects by providing a companion observatory and microlander mission to the NASA DART impactor, which will strike the small Moon orbiting the Didymos binary asteroid with ESA’s Asteroid
Impact Mission (AIM) mission; 
–preparing the technologies for the removal of debris through the preparatory activities for e.Deorbit/Tug;
–continuing to invest efforts in other debris mitigation and remediation measures;
•continuing to invest and strengthening the European Space Security and Education Centre (ESEC)  in Redu, Belgium; 
•investing in the next generation of satellite navigation/positioning navigation timing innovative propositions in partnership with Member States and industry along the entire satellite navigation value chain, through the Navigation Innovation and
Support (NAVISP) programme; 
•developing innovative and secure satellite telecommunication systems and services through the Govsatcom Precursor programme;
•providing support to industry for European non-dependence on critical technologies by establishing an inventory of technologies considered critical and not available in Europe through the European Component Initiative;
•maintaining mission operations infrastructures.

Foundation: excellence in space science and technology
Target amount: €4.5 billion 

Excellent science and technology are a prerequisite for success. ESA intends to guarantee that this prerequisite is fulfilled, now and in the future, by:
•preparing Europe for the future with preparation and discovery projects, early ‘blue sky’ research, technical, scientific and strategic studies and technology development activities in direct support of ESA missions or projects, through the Preparation,
Discovery and Technology Development programme;
•continuing to develop a variety of science mission types and sizes to ensure a long-term perspective for the scientific community to respond to the evolving challenges of science and the rise of new scientific ideas, to enhance humanity’s knowledge,
and to implement global cooperation for global stability, through the scientific programme, that includes the following upcoming missions:
–the launch readiness of Cheops to study exoplanet transits in 2017/2018 (to be launched as a passenger on a TBD primary payload); 
–the launch of BepiColombo to Mercury in 2018, by Ariane 5; 
–the launch of the NASA-led JWST mission in 2018, by Ariane 5; 
–the launch of Solar Orbiter in 2018 to study the Sun and the heliospere, by a NASA-provided Atlas 5; 
–the launch of Euclid in 2020, by a Soyuz from CSG, for understanding the nature of “dark energy”.
•operating the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter in orbit around Mars since October 2016, as well as the completion and preparation for the launch of the ExoMars 2020 mission;
•providing ESA exploration products for landing and resources investigation for the Russian-led Luna-Resource Lander 
(Luna-27) mission and the building-up of a broad European lunar exploration user community, to exploit the engineering/scientific data and the other benefits generated during the project;
•developing exploration technologies and exploration concepts in preparation for new projects in human and robotic exploration for decision at the 2019 ESA Council meeting at Ministerial level through ExPeRT (Exploration Preparation, Research and Technology);

•undertaking world-class science in space and including multiple research results from the ISS, non-ISS space platforms and space environment analogues, to advance Europe’s knowledge base, support its economy and help prepare future space exploration
through SciSpacE;
•preparing meaningful European contributions to human exploration activities beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO) building on the ISS programme through Human Exploration beyond LEO;
•acquiring demonstrated technical capabilities and associated organisation for on-demand quick implementation on operational or future launchers, in view of launch service competitiveness, through the Future Launchers Preparatory Programme New Economic
Opportunities and through the Vega E (evolution) preparatory activities, including in particular system and stage studies;
•developing technologies with the specific aims of reducing time to market and increased in-orbit demonstration and validation through a renewed General Support Technology Programme (GSTP);
•PRODEX (PROgramme de Développement d’Expériences scientifiques) will continue to offer institutions and industry the chance to work on ESA experiments. 
•developing and maintaining core technical expertise, including technical assessments, investments and maintenance of engineering laboratories and test facilities.


Currently proposed financial envelope per programme families

The figures provided in the table below are indicative and provide a feel for the breadth of activities possible in and from space to fulfil the goals of Europe in space. 

By coming together on 1–2 December in Lucerne, Ministers will, together with the ESA Executive, discuss and finally decide what the focus for the coming years will be. This trade-off will consider the affordability of Member States and will lead to
the final selection of those activities that can best serve a united Europe to master today’s challenges and face those ahead.


Programme Families

Earth Observation ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19: 500 M€ 
Total CM16: 1600 M€  (up to 2025) 

Telecom ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017-19: 500 M€ 
Total CM16: /1200 M€   (up to 2024) 

Navigation  ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19: 50 M€ 
Total CM16: 100 M€ (up to 2021) ) 

Exploration  ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19: 1100 M€ 
Total CM16: 1600 M€ (up to 2021) 

Prodex (support to Scientific Programme) ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19:100 M€ 
Total CM16: 200 M€ (up to 2021) 

Launchers ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19: 1000 M€ 
Total CM16: 1700 M€ (up to 2023) 

Space Safety/Space Traffic Management  ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19:: 200 M€   
Total CM16: 400 M€ (up to 2022) ) 

Technology  ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19:100 M€ 
Total CM16: 300 M€  (up to 2022) 

Science, Research, and Development – ESA Mandatory Activities ( M€ at 2016 e.c.)
Sum 2017–19: 2300 M€
Total CM16: 3900 M€   (up to 2021) 

Total
2017–19 (M€ at 2016 e.c.) = 6 B€
Total CM16(M€ at 2016 e.c.) = 11 B€


Offline jacqmans

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Press Release
N°43-2016

Paris, 15 November 2016

Call for Media: ESA Council meeting at ministerial level, Lucerne, Switzerland, 1–2 December 2016

ESA’s Ministerial Council will be held in Lucerne, Switzerland on 
1–2 December. Ministers in charge of space activities from the 22 ESA Member States and Canada will meet to decide on future space activities for Europe. 

The meeting will further the vision of a United Space in Europe in the era of Space 4.0. 

A background note on the objectives and programmatic aspects tabled for discussion was issued on 14 November 2016 (ESA PR 42-2016).

Accreditation

Media wishing to attend must be accredited by Wednesday, 23 November. To obtain a personal access badge, press credentials are required for accreditation. 
The passport or national ID card listed on the accreditation form must be shown at the venue. No other means of identification will be accepted. 

For accreditation, please fill out the form at:


https://myconvento.com/public/event_register/index/1504856


Address of event: Culture and Convention Centre Lucerne (KKL), Europaplatz 1, CH-6005 Lucerne

For this new venue, ESA is not arranging accommodation for media. 


Press programme (provisional; all times CET)

Thursday, 1 December 
07:30
Opening of Press Centre and accreditation formalities 
08:45–09:00
Opportunity for photographers to visit the conference room 

09:00
Council meeting at ministerial level starts (not open to media) 

10:00 
Press briefing: introduction to the Council deliberations 

12:45
Official group photo of Ministers (for professional photographers only) 

13:00
Lunch break 

15:00
Meeting resumes 

18:30
Expected end of meeting

20:30
Press Centre closes

Friday, 2 December
07:30
Opening of Press Centre and accreditation formalities 

09:00
Council meeting at ministerial level starts (not open to media) 

13:00
Expected end of meeting, followed by a press conference with the ESA Director General and the Chairs of the Council at Ministerial Level.  Meeting not expected to go beyond 15:00

18:30
Press Centre closes 
All requests for interviews should be addressed to ESA Media Relations at the Press Centre. 
ESA TV
ESA TV will provide: 

Videos 21–29 November explaining what is at stake in Lucerne for each ESA programme Directorate will  be transmitted via ESA TV platforms (ESA TV ftp, EbS).

ESA TV will edit highlights before, during and after the conference and put them in a dedicated folder on ESA TV FTP news site: ftp://tvdownload.esa.int/ Login: esa/ Password ftp4esa

All details will be available at: http://www.esa.int/esatv/Television
Images 
The latest high-resolution images can be found at:

ESA’s Multimedia Gallery: http://spaceinimages.esa.int/Images 

Media image queries can be directed to spaceinimages@esa.int 

Social media 
ESA will cover events on Social Media via the following channels:

Twitter: http://twitter.com/ESA  Hashtag #ESACM16
Additional coverage will be available via: 

Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/EuropeanSpaceAgency 
Google+  https://plus.google.com/+EuropeanSpaceAgency/
Flickr  https://www.flickr.com/photos/europeanspaceagency 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ESA_events   

Questions may be asked via https://www.reddit.com/r/esa/

Offline mupp

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Quote
preparing Europe for independent routine access and return from LEO with a reusable system able to transport payloads for several different applications through Space Rider (based on Vega C), and activities involving Dream Chaser (based on Ariane 64);

http://www.esa.int/About_Us/Ministerial_Council_2016/Media_backgrounder_ESA_s_Ministerial_2016_in_Lucerne

Neat.....
« Last Edit: 11/15/2016 10:08 PM by mupp »

Offline Star One

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This seems relevant to this thread. I am hoping the UK's strong vote in favour of ESA will mean as one result that the likelihood of Tim Peake flying again is increased.

Britain endorses ESA, promises increased export-credit support for industry

Quote
PARIS — The British government has emphatically endorsed its investment in the 22-nation European Space Agency and rejected a parliamentary proposal that its space budget be more evenly divided between ESA and a national program.

Countering the centrifugal trend in Europe — highlighted by the U.K. decision to quit the European Union — the government reaffirmed that Brexit will have no effect on the UK role in ESA.

“The UK’s investment in the European Space Agency is an important part of our overall investment in space, from which we obtain excellent value,” the government said in a written response to questions from the UK Parliament’s Science and Technology Committee, which were published Nov. 24.

ESA “is a membership organization which contains members from both within and outside the European Union, and the UK will continue to be a member of the European Space Agency after the UK leaves the European Union.”

The government’s statement, coming just a week before ESA ministers meet in Lucerne, Switzerland, to debate a multi-year funding package of around $12 billion, will be music to the ears of ESA officials always wary that the zero-sum-calculus of European national budgets means that more national spending translates into less ESA investment.

- See more at: http://spacenews.com/britain-endorses-esa-promises-increased-export-credit-support-for-industry/#sthash.jHlbGphF.dpuf
« Last Edit: 11/25/2016 06:59 PM by Star One »

Offline bolun

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« Last Edit: 11/26/2016 02:49 PM by bolun »

Offline Star One

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As the UK has reconfirmed its support for ESA it would be nice if ESA reciprocated and showed more monetary support for REL.

Offline catdlr

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ESA has up a YouTube Playlist of related videos for this meeting....

ESA Ministerial 2016 - United Space in Europe

Published on Nov 21, 2016
European spirit, identity and cohesion are the overarching aspects for Europe to achieve the best of outcomes for its states and citizens in space and for a globally successful European space sector.

United Space in Europe describes the intensive cooperation of different European entities for the sake of a strengthening of Europe. With this strengthened European cooperation in space, the 2016 Ministerial Council will further ESA’s breadth and strength of action to cover its mandate as laid out in the ESA Convention through enhanced partnership with its Member States, with other institutional actors and with space actors worldwide.

The conference takes place in the advent of the Space 4.0 era, a time when space is evolving from being the preserve of the governments of a few spacefaring nations to a situation in which there is the increased number of diverse space actors around the world, including the emergence of private companies, participation with academia, industry and citizens, digitalisation and global interaction.

Space 4.0 represents the evolution of the space sector into a new era, characterised by a new playing field. This era is unfolding through interaction between governments, private sector, society and politics. Space 4.0 is analogous to, and is intertwined with, Industry 4.0, which is considered as the unfolding fourth industrial revolution of manufacturing and services.

To meet the challenges and to proactively develop the different aspects of Space 4.0, the European space sector can become globally competitive only by fully integrating into European society and economy. This requires a sustainable space sector closely connected with the fabric of society and economy. For this to happen, space must be safe, secure and easily and readily accessible, and built on a foundation of excellence in science and technology – broadly and continuously over time.

ESA will table proposals at the meeting to meet the common European goals for space in this exciting and challenging new era.

Read more about the ESA Ministerial Council 2016:
http://www.esa.int/About_Us/Ministerial_Council_2016

YouTube Playlist
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbyvawxScNbt6N4TkCmRCuGoIMCzswTOJ

« Last Edit: 11/27/2016 04:10 AM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

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ESA’s Ministerial Council is taking place in Lucerne, Switzerland on 1–2 December 2016. Ministers in charge of space activities from the 22 ESA Member States, Slovenia and Canada are meeting to decide on future space activities for Europe.


copyrights: ESA-Stephane Corvaja, 2016.
« Last Edit: 12/02/2016 08:19 AM by jacqmans »

Offline yg1968

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Offline jacqmans

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Press Release
No. 50-2016

Lucerne, 2 December 2016

European ministers ready ESA for a United Space in Europe in the era of Space 4.0

ESA today concluded a two-day Council meeting at ministerial level in Lucerne, Switzerland. Ministers in charge for space  matters from ESA’s 22 member states plus Slovenia and Canada allocated €10.3 billion for space activities and programmes based
on the vision of a United Space in Europe in the era of Space 4.0.

The high level of subscriptions demonstrates once more that ESA’s Member States consider space as a strategic and attractive investment with a particularly high socio-economic value.

It also underlines that ESA is THE European Space Agency capable of channeling their investment to respond effectively to regional, national and European needs by covering all elements of space: science, human spaceflight, exploration, launchers, telecommunications,
navigation, Earth observation, applications (combining space, airborne and terrestrial technology), operations and technologies; as well as responding to the needs and challenges of Europe and the Member States by bringing together all stakeholders.

Ministers confirmed the confidence that ESA can conceptualize, shape and organize the change in the European space sector and in ESA itself. While also acting as a global player, broker and mediator at the centre of international cooperation in space
activities, in areas ranging from the far away in exploration (with the concept of a Moon Village for instance) to supporting closer to home the international global climate research effort following the Paris Agreement of 2o15.

At this summit, Ministers in charge of space matters have declared support for ESA’s Director General’s vision for Europe in space and the role and development of ESA: now the Space 4.0i era can start with ESA committing to inform, innovate, interact
and inspire. And, building on commercialization, participation, digitalization, jobs and growth, the concept of  “United Space in Europe” will soon become a reality.

The following Resolutions were adopted:

– Towards Space 4.0 for a United Space in Europe,
– Level of Resources for the Agency’s Mandatory Activities 2017-2021,
– CSG (Guiana Space Centre) (2017-2021),
– ESA Programmes

Additionally, a Resolution on setting up the “ESA Grand Challenge” was approved in regular Council on 30 November.

The Resolutions are available on ESA’s website. 

The sums allocated by Ministers to allow ESA to reach its future goals can be summarized as follows :

Maximise the integration of space into European society and economy
Amount: €2.5 billion

Foster a globally competitive European space sector
Amount: €1.4 billion

Ensure European autonomy in accessing and using space in a safe and secure environment
Amount: €1.8 billion

Foundation: excellence in space science and technology
Amount: €4.6 billion

The same amounts can also be seen spread in a more traditional  approach by programme families.

Programme Families Total CM16
(M€ at 2016 e.c.)

Earth Observation 1370 (up to 2025)
Telecom 1280 (up to 2024)
Navigation 69 (up to 2021)
Exploration 1452 (up to 2021)
Prodex (support to Scientific Programme) 172 (up to 2021)
Launchers 1611 (up to 2023)
Space Safety 95 (up to 2022)
Technology 445 (up to 2022)
Science, Research, and Development – ESA Mandatory Activities 3813 (up to 2021)

Total 10.3 B€

The figures above include Member States' additional subscriptions to already-running optional programmes not tabled at the Ministerial. 

Next Council at Ministerial Level 

Ministers decided to hold the next Council at ministerial level during late 2019 in Spain under the Chairmanship of  Luis de Guindos, Minister of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness.

Offline yg1968

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Quote
preparing Europe for independent routine access and return from LEO with a reusable system able to transport payloads for several different applications through Space Rider (based on Vega C), and activities involving Dream Chaser (based on Ariane 64);

http://www.esa.int/About_Us/Ministerial_Council_2016/Media_backgrounder_ESA_s_Ministerial_2016_in_Lucerne

Neat.....

Here is a presentation on Space Rider:
http://www.cesmamil-hypersonic.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/35.1-SPACE-RIDER-the-Reusable-Orbital-Re-entry-Vehicle-for-Europe-Massobrio-Rufolo.pdf

See also this thread:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41709.0
« Last Edit: 12/02/2016 03:18 PM by yg1968 »

Offline yg1968

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Offline jacqmans

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December 02, 2016
RELEASE 16-116

NASA Administrator Statement on ESA’s Commitment to Space Station

The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on ESA’s (European Space Agency’s) decision to continue its operations aboard the International Space Station:

"I'm excited all the International Space Station partners have now joined us in committing to operation of this invaluable resource through at least 2024.

"The European Space Agency contributions to station are essential, and we look forward to continuing to work with ESA, the Canadian Space Agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and Roscomos for extended operations, and to collaborating with other nations to push the boundaries of human exploration, and extend our reach farther into the solar system as part of the ongoing Journey to Mars."

For more information about the International Space Station, its research and crews, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Offline jacqmans

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Press release, 2 December 2016

ESA Council meeting at ministerial level in Lucerne – Germany awards approximately two billion euro to space projects

The highest decision-making body of the European Space Agency (ESA) met this year on 1 and 2 December at the Culture and Convention Centre (KKL) in Lucerne, Switzerland, to set the financial and
programme-based course for European space travel for the coming years. Ministers in charge of space in Europe last came together exactly two years ago on 2 December 2014 in Luxembourg.

The German Federal Government was represented by Brigitte Zypries, Parliamentary State Secretary at the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). Brigitte Zypries, who is also aerospace
coordinator, was supported by Pascale Ehrenfreund, Chair of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) Executive Board and Gerd Gruppe, Member of the DLR Executive
Board responsible for the Space Administration, which, in close collaboration with the BMWi, prepared the German position for the ESA Council meeting at ministerial level.

"Our commitment to the application programmes, in particular, leads to concrete benefits for people. Satellite-based Earth observation is the basis for improved climate protection. In addition,
innovative business models are created for German companies through the use of satellite data," emphasised Brigitte Zypries. "We have also succeeded in supporting small and medium-sized enterprises
in space investment." At the same time, from a German perspective, the focus was on the ESA programmes, which, with excellent research, fundamentally expand the understanding of the Universe and
Earth and are the basis for strategic international cooperation. The International Space Station (ISS) also wants to make further use of Germany: "We are taking responsibility for a central global
project at the ISS, and the Space Station offers excellent opportunities for research under space conditions, and the German industry is also benefiting from results, for example in the field of
materials research. And we are looking forward to Alexander Gerst’s mission in 2018,” added Zypries.

“With our investments in the programme, we are ensuring the necessary continuity, but are also placing new emphasis on particularly future-oriented topics. The German contribution has succeeded
in establishing the European participation in the ISS reliably and in the long term by 2024. With 29 million euro for ExoMars, Germany has maintained its commitments and is thus a strong partner
in this international cooperation with the US and Russia,” adds DLR Chair Pascale Ehrenfreund, and emphasises: "With our scientific and technological expertise and our stakeholders in programmes
such as Earth observation, we can make a decisive contribution to international development assistance and the implementation of the global sustainability and environmental targets of the United
Nations."

At the ESA Council meeting at ministerial level, financial resources totalling around 10.3 billion euro were awarded. Germany provided two billion euro and is thus one of the largest ESA contributors.
More specifically, Germany accounted for around 903 million euro for the ESA compulsory programmes, which in addition to the general budget, include the science programme and the European spaceport
in French Guiana. Around 1.2 billion euro of the German contribution was allocated to the so-called optional programmes: more specifically, around 300 million euro to Earth observation, some 160
million euro to telecommunications, around 63 million euro to technology programmes and around 346 million euro to continuing operation of the International Space Station (ISS) until 2019 and about
88 million for research under space conditions. In addition, Germany is supporting the extension of ISS operation until 2024 in the form of a political declaration. 

German financial contributions in detail:

E3P – new framework programme for research and exploration

All robotic and astronautical activities for exploration are combined in the new European Exploration Envelope (framework) Programme (E3P). This combines the European science and technology programme
for use of near-Earth orbit for space research with exploration of the Moon and Mars. Subprogrammes here include the ISS (German share: 346 million euro) and its utilisation programme SciSpacE
(German share: 88 million euro) in low Earth orbit. Germany is thereby taking on the leading role. For the continuation of the ExoMars mission the member countries contributed a further 339 million
euro, of which Germany;s share was about 28 million. In addition, Germany is investing 21 million euro in ExPeRT (exploration, preparation, research and technology), a programme for mission studies
and technology development for further exploration, including a commercial approach.   

Launchers

In terms of launchers, the central decisions lay with the ‘Launchers Exploitation Accompaniment’ (LEAP) and Centre Spatial Guyanais (CSG) operating programmes. Germany contributed 155 million euro
here and is the strongest partner after France.

From 2020, Ariane 6 will be the new launcher to transport payloads into space. Germany is contributing with a share of around 23 percent in the total costs of Ariane 6 development; the principal
industrial contractors are Airbus Safran Launchers (in Germany with sites in Bremen and Ottobrunn) and MT Aerospace in Augsburg and Bremen.

To remain competitive over the long term, too, innovative technologies, processes and system concepts need to be developed and made market ready. These New Economic Opportunities (NEOs) are set
to drastically reduce development and subsequent production costs while at the same time decreasing the development risk. Germany has contributed 52 million euro to this Future Launchers Preparation
Programme (FLPP).

Science

By 2035, seven average-sized and three large-scale exploration missions, along with further analyses of the Solar System and galaxies, are set to begin within the ESA science programme. Financing
of this programme depends on the economic power of the Member States. At 20 percent, Germany is the largest contributor to this programme, contributing 542 million euro.

Of particular German interest is the PLATO mission, which is set to survey large portions of the sky for exoplanets and bright stars from 2025. The DLR Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin
is taking the scientific lead here and also developing the payload for the mission. The German aerospace industry, and in particular OHB and Airbus Defence & Space, are playing a particularly
decisive role. The data centre is being built to a significant degree at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen. The DLR Space Administration has primary responsibility
to ESA for delivery of the payload.

Germany is contributing to six out of a total of 11 instruments for the Jupiter moon mission JUICE (planned launch date: 2022), two of which are being managed by Germany.

BepiColombo, the European–Japanese mission to the closest planet to the sun, Mercury, is set to launch in April 2018, bringing new insights into the formation of the Solar System. German research
institutes are contributing to the mission with six instruments.

At the end of 2020, the Euclid mission is set to explore the question of ‘dark matter’ and dark energy in the Universe. German partners include the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics
in Garching, the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, the University Observatory Munich and the University of Bonn

Earth observation

From climate research and global environmental monitoring to increasingly precise weather forecasts and satellite-based disaster relief, Germany, together with the UK, is the largest contributor
to Earth observation programmes, contributing 300 million euro, and wants to retain its leading international position in this field. German industry and research groups have been and are to a
large extent involved in successful missions such as GOCE, Cryosat 2, SWARM and SMOS as well as in the future missions ADM / Aeolus, BIOMASS, FLEX and EarthCARE. The ESA Climate Initiative (GMECV
+) is currently providing 12 essential climate variables and was extended at the ESA Council meeting at ministerial level.

Satellite communications

In the field of satellite communications (ARTES programme), the main goal is to support innovative technologies and products for the global commercial market. Germany contributed around 160 million
euro. Here, German industry has made a several-year head start with the development of laser communication terminals. Germany has therefore contributed 26 million euro to the new Skylight programme
to further develop optical technologies. Furthermore, Germany is financing commercially focused integrated applications (‘NewSpace’ activities) with around 18 million euro. A further 64 million
euro have been awarded to develop ‘Electra’, one of the small satellite buses with electric motors led by Bremen-based company OHB. The SmallGEO platform built in Germany for the smaller telecommunications
satellites market segment is being further developed. On 27 January 2017, the first SmallGEO satellite will be launched from French Guiana.

Space situational awareness

Germany awarded 16 million euro to the ‘Space Situational Awareness’ (SSA) programme, with a focus on space weather. Better knowledge of space weather makes a valuable contribution to the preservation
and sustainable use of space-based and terrestrial infrastructures, such as in the case of global navigation satellite systems and for science. It also represents important data for the German
Space Situational Awareness Centre.

Technological development

The German programme contribution to the so-called General Support Technology Programme (GSTP) aims in particular to maintain, expand and strengthen the industrial competitiveness of German SMEs,
particularly start-ups. The German contribution is around 63 million euro.


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Canadian Space Agency strengthens long-term partnership with European Space Agency to support innovation and science

December 2, 2016 – Lucerne, Switzerland

The European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) member states and cooperating states gathered in Lucerne, Switzerland, to make important investment decisions regarding Europe’s future space activities.

Today, on behalf of the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) President Sylvain Laporte confirmed the Government of Canada’s increased contribution to key ESA programmes.

To support innovation and evidence-based science in Canada’s space sector, Canada will be investing approximately $83 million (€53.6 million) in three programmes. The investment includes an additional $30 million announced in Budget 2016 for ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) programme.

The investment, in addition to strengthening the long-term partnership with ESA, is one that will support cutting-edge research and industry growth.

The Canada–ESA Cooperation Agreement has enabled Canadian industry, universities and scientists to develop strategic partnerships in the global space sector by participating in ESA space missions for more than 35 years. Through this collaboration, the Canadian space sector also gains access to data from ESA missions and infrastructure. As a result of the government’s continued investment, Canada will be able to use space to drive broader economic growth and leverage space for the benefit of all Canadians.

Quick facts


·         Formal cooperation between Canada and ESA began in 1979 with the signing of the first Cooperation Agreement. This agreement has since been renewed four times.

·         ESA Council Meetings at Ministerial Level occur every three to four years. They gather member states and cooperating states to confirm their investments in ongoing and future ESA programmes. Canada is ESA’s only non-European cooperating state.

·         The contribution to ARTES, the Earth Observation Envelope Programme, and the General Support Technology Programme will be distributed over the next seven years.


·         The Canadian space sector generates important socio-economic benefits including $5.4 billion in revenue, a GDP impact of $2.9 billion, and a workforce of 10,000 Canadians.


Quotes

“Canada’s space program is, in effect, a research and innovation program. It leverages the benefits of space for all Canadians. The technologies designed for today’s space program can be applied tomorrow to our everyday lives and raise the living standards of all Canadians. The Canadian Space Agency’s participation in the European Space Agency’s programmes ensures that our country’s space industry remains dynamic and competitive in a rapidly evolving global market.”

The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

“Canada’s continued participation in the European Space Agency’s programmes will contribute to the growth of Canada’s space industry, including the creation of highly skilled jobs, and provide access to international space missions and global markets.”

Sylvain Laporte, President, Canadian Space Agency

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« Last Edit: 12/07/2016 05:23 PM by yg1968 »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Future Launcher preporations program got about 200mln. The Prometheus engine development is with 83 mln the largest share of this. (They requested 100mln for prometheus)

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