Poll

Falcon Heavy will have it's first successful launch in (what month) in 2015?

January
0 (0%)
February
1 (0.5%)
March
4 (1.9%)
April
3 (1.4%)
May
3 (1.4%)
June
10 (4.7%)
July
26 (12.3%)
August
34 (16.1%)
September
37 (17.5%)
October
33 (15.6%)
November
23 (10.9%)
December
12 (5.7%)
No successful launch
25 (11.8%)

Total Members Voted: 211

Voting closed: 01/06/2015 12:15 AM


Author Topic: Poll: Falcon Heavy will have it's first successful launch?  (Read 6158 times)

Offline sdsds

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Re: Poll: Falcon Heavy will have it's first successful launch?
« Reply #20 on: 09/02/2016 04:03 AM »
Oh wow! <Blushes>
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Offline Danderman

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Re: Poll: Falcon Heavy will have it's first successful launch?
« Reply #21 on: 12/19/2016 07:26 PM »
a lot of optimists here.

I should state for the record my guess as to when FH flies with crossfeed in a version that could approach 50 metric tons as payload: never.

Offline sdsds

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Re: Poll: Falcon Heavy will have it's first successful launch?
« Reply #22 on: 12/19/2016 07:55 PM »
my guess as to when FH flies with crossfeed in a version that could approach 50 metric tons as payload: never.

Aw, shucks! I was so hoping to see a FH center core launch from Florida and land in California. Without crossfeed there can be no hope....
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Online Pipcard

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Re: Poll: Falcon Heavy will have it's first successful launch?
« Reply #23 on: 12/20/2016 09:24 AM »
my guess as to when FH flies with crossfeed in a version that could approach 50 metric tons as payload: never.

Aw, shucks! I was so hoping to see a FH center core launch from Florida and land in California. Without crossfeed there can be no hope....
Even with crossfeed I don't think it can go that far. To do that would require being almost at orbital speed.

I've checked in Orbiter space flight simulator - just deorbit a satellite to just few hundred m/s short of orbital speed, and the projected (purely ballistic) landing point falls back rather quickly.
« Last Edit: 12/20/2016 09:38 AM by Pipcard »

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