Author Topic: 3-D Printing in Space  (Read 16556 times)

Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #40 on: 08/24/2016 04:08 PM »
Do we have enough surplus energy for this manufacturing proposed?
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Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #41 on: 08/25/2016 05:34 PM »
Do we have enough surplus energy for this manufacturing proposed?
The energy requirement looks to be the heating of the source material and then the cooling of the fiber. So to produce the amounts at the rates being discussed by MIS, it should not take much power in a % value of that available on ISS or even on a more power constrained BA330 module. These are small NAROO (no assembly required on orbit) rack mount boxes that are doing the work not some large built up system. To produce from 6 to 14 km of fiber a 2 kg block of source material is what is being brought to a melting point. It takes ~20Mj to melt the 2 kg block and that is equivelent to just ~6 kwh. Meaning to also cool it would require 12kwh to produce the entire fiber from the source block. If the unit only pulls 200w it would take ~60hours (2 1/2 days) to produce the complete fiber.

So the amount of power used by these boxes is almost trivial to the other power requirements of the ISS or other space-station such as a BA330.

A BTW that 6km of fiber at $300/m let alone the $3000/m price is worth $1.8M. At $3,000/m it is worth $18M.
« Last Edit: 08/25/2016 05:38 PM by oldAtlas_Eguy »

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #42 on: 09/23/2016 04:27 PM »

http://www.spacedaily.com/m/reports/UK_Ministry_Of_Defence_increases_investment_in_Magna_Parva_in_space_manufacturing_technology_999.html

Current pre-manufactured structures (antennae, solar arrays, deployment booms) designed to go into space are high in mass and volume, and have specific launch environment requirements. By manufacturing in space, many of these requirements are eliminated, offering an order of magnitude capability increase over current state of the art systems. Based on a deployed length to packed volume ratio of greater than 1000:1, the Magna Parva market disruptive technology can offer a new and unexplored utility from even small satellites.

Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #43 on: 12/28/2016 06:20 PM »
New related story that suggests that to support expanded in-space manufacturing the down-mass capabilities (to get the manufactured goods to the largest market) will need to expand greatly.

http://spacenews.com/space-manufacturing-and-the-last-mile/

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #44 on: 01/24/2017 08:47 AM »
Made in Space partnership with Axiom.

https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/made-space-explain-3d-printing-advancing-space-industry-103818/

Looks like 3D printing in space may actually be a via business.

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