Author Topic: 3-D Printing in Space  (Read 25516 times)

Offline WindyCity

3-D Printing in Space
« on: 10/20/2014 08:56 PM »
Recently, a 3-D printer designed and manufactured by Made in Space launched to the ISS. It will soon begin testing. This revolutionary technology will be crucial to making long-duration space flight and extraterrestrial colonization possible. In the near term, having to launch only raw materials out of Earth’s gravity well, rather than manufactured parts, will not only decrease payload mass, but will also add to the safety and robustness of systems that cannot be serviced easily or cheaply from the home planet. I came across a recently made hour-long video interview with Jason Dunn, a founder and the chief technical officer of Made in Space. If you’re interested in this cutting edge technology, watching it would well be worth your time. Not only is the story of how the company built a 3-D printer that would work in zero-G fascinating, but I learned in more detail why it will help facilitate the exploration and settlement of space. For instance, with this technology less mass will be required to launch from Earth, because objects designed to work only in zero- or low-G, and that don’t have to survive the stresses and vibrational loads of launch, can be designed to utilize far less material. Enjoy!


Quote
The Exciting Possibilities of 3D Printing in Zero-G
Thursday, October 16, 3:00 pm


NASA is currently engaged in exploring of 3D printing in space using a printer designed by Made In Space. This printer is designed to work in a microgravity environment to produce space assets in... well... SPACE!
NASA wants to test the idea of making parts inexpensively in orbit as opposed to down here on Earth and launching them to where they need to be.
3D printing serves as a fast and inexpensive way to manufacture parts on-site and on-demand, reducing the need for costly spares on the International Space Station and future spacecraft. Long-term missions would benefit greatly from having onboard manufacturing capabilities. Data and experience gathered in this demonstration will improve future 3-dimensional manufacturing technology and equipment for the space program, allowing a greater degree of autonomy and flexibility for astronauts.
Please join Tony Darnell Dr Carol Christian and Scott Lewis as they discuss this new experiment from NASA with Jason Dunn and Michael Snyder from Made in Space, the company contracted by NASA to build the 3D printer currently being used.
For more information on NASA's 3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/1115.html#description
Made in Space:
http://www.madeinspace.us/

View the Hubble Hangout video at .

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #1 on: 10/20/2014 09:23 PM »
The lastest Space show (19oct ) has Mike Snyder from made in space as guest. I've yet to listen to it.

http://www.thespaceshow.com/

Offline mto

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #2 on: 10/20/2014 11:00 PM »
Also the latest Hubble Hangout:

Streamed live on Oct 16, 2014
+NASA is currently engaged in exploring 3D printing in space using a printer designed by Made In Space.  This printer is designed to work in a microgravity environment to produce space assets in... well... SPACE!

NASA wants to test the idea of making parts inexpensively in orbit as opposed to down here on Earth and launching them to where they need to be.

3D printing serves as a fast and inexpensive way to manufacture parts on-site and on-demand, reducing the need for costly spares on the International Space Station and future spacecraft. Long-term missions would benefit greatly from having onboard manufacturing capabilities. Data and experience gathered in this demonstration will improve future 3-dimensional manufacturing technology and equipment for the space program, allowing a greater degree of autonomy and flexibility for astronauts.

Please join +Tony Darnell Dr +Carol Christian  and +Scott Lewis as they discuss this new experiment from NASA with +Jason Dunn and Michael Snyder from Made in Space, the company contracted by NASA to build the 3D printer currently being used.




Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #3 on: 10/21/2014 09:16 AM »
The video is definitely worth watching, very informative.
Here is a points I picked from the video and Spaceshow.

1) Printer to be used in an enclosed glovebox size compartment. The printer is just one more experiment in the queue to use this glovebox hence the wait.

2) Only prints ABS plastic on this version, next year's commercial version will support a larger range of plastics.

3) NASA did a study of all the parts required to fix recorded failures on ISS. This printer can produce 30% of these parts. NASA reckons 80% of the parts could been produced with current earth based 3D technology.Given a metal and carbon fibre printer I'm picking they will be able to cover most of those 80% parts.

4) Besides making spares and tools,  can also produce lite weight structures for experiments or modifications for experiments. Should allow some experiments quicker turn arounds between attempts. Imagine spend millions getting an experiment in space to find it just needs a small part manufactured to stop it being a write off.

5) Currently working on a machine that can recycle plastic into feedstock, currently working in lab. They could recycle the packaging that supplies are sent in to for shipment to  ISS into something useful. This could also find benefits on earth.

6) Printer very rugged will work from 0-2g, low maintenance no calibration required. I can see uses on earth for a rugged printer eg Ships,oil rig, Antarctic base. May end up be a prestige 3D printer brand.

7) Looking at other developing 3D technology to see if it can be adapted for space. They are now the world experts on doing this so they should be able to charge for this expertise, not stated in interviews but they have to make money.

 




   

Offline rusty

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #4 on: 10/21/2014 09:10 PM »
For practicality and to make full use of this I imagine a small, sealed workbench will be needed alongside it.
At minimum, a vice and Dremel will be needed to clean up edges on fresh parts. More likely, small mods will be made as well as slight repairs to existing parts. Sealed with filters because there's ne reason for astronauts to join the metal-in-the-eye-club - at least not while in orbit.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #5 on: 10/21/2014 10:11 PM »
They can take the automation one step further and have an external robotic arm service the printer.
1) Reload feed stock.
2) Remove the printed part.
3) Tidy up / machine printed part in an enclosed box then present finished part to the astronaut.

The more stuff that can be done remotely from earth the better as an astronaut's time is precious.

Offline WindyCity

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #6 on: 10/22/2014 12:02 AM »
The Mike Snyder interview on The Space Show was also worth the listen.

I was interested to hear how tough a sell he thinks it will be to convince NASA to utilize 3-D printed parts on the ISS. One  sticking point is the testing that normally gets done on hardware designated for launch. A part that slides off the printer bed could have deformities or material deficiencies that they wouldn't be able to ascertain without having the testing equipment on board. Adopting additive manufacturing will require a change in the agency's accustomed habits.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #7 on: 10/22/2014 02:49 AM »
Yeah, characterization is a big issue. Yet to be solved. A micro-CT (X-Ray) system could be a big help, but it'd be bigger than the printer.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline WindyCity

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #8 on: 10/22/2014 05:21 PM »
Yeah, characterization is a big issue. Yet to be solved. A micro-CT (X-Ray) system could be a big help, but it'd be bigger than the printer.

What would allow them to work around this problem? Reliance on statistical quality control? A long-term experimental program to determine how reliable 3-D printing is?

Offline rusty

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #9 on: 10/23/2014 12:03 AM »
Yeah, characterization is a big issue. Yet to be solved. A micro-CT (X-Ray) system could be a big help, but it'd be bigger than the printer.
What would allow them to work around this problem? Reliance on statistical quality control? A long-term experimental program to determine how reliable 3-D printing is?
No, and no where near that bulky, expensive or time consuming. All they need is what's already on the shelf for diagnosing metalwork (welding and casting), composite construction and many other uses - a hand held sonar.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #10 on: 10/23/2014 02:53 AM »
One thing that came out of Made in Space interviews was the need to allow for 3D printing of spares when designing new space stations. Ideally most parts on a new spacestation will be printed on the same printers that will be carried on board. In case of large parts allow for a replaced to be printed from multiple smaller parts and bolted together.



Offline WindyCity

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #11 on: 10/23/2014 03:45 AM »
No, and no where near that bulky, expensive or time consuming. All they need is what's already on the shelf for diagnosing metalwork (welding and casting), composite construction and many other uses - a hand held sonar.

If the issue is that easy to resolve, I wonder why Mike Snyder stated that convincing NASA that 3-D printing is reliable will require a lot of heavy-duty persuasion and proof.

One thing that came out of Made in Space interviews was the need to allow for 3D printing of spares when designing new space stations. Ideally most parts on a new spacestation will be printed on the same printers that will be carried on board. In case of large parts allow for a replaced to be printed from multiple smaller parts and bolted together.

Sparing is a big problem. The MIT analysis of Mars One’s mission design cited its failure to adequately account for sparing needs as probably a fatal flaw. Additive manufacturing could go a long way toward resolving it.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #12 on: 10/23/2014 04:12 AM »
You can get a solid model very easily from a microCT machine, showing all the voids down to tens of microns. Can even convert it back to a solid model file if you want, for automated FEA to make sure it won't fail immediately. Handheld ultrasonic device can't do that, not even close.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #13 on: 11/17/2014 11:42 AM »
No, and no where near that bulky, expensive or time consuming. All they need is what's already on the shelf for diagnosing metalwork (welding and casting), composite construction and many other uses - a hand held sonar.

If the issue is that easy to resolve, I wonder why Mike Snyder stated that convincing NASA that 3-D printing is reliable will require a lot of heavy-duty persuasion and proof.

One thing that came out of Made in Space interviews was the need to allow for 3D printing of spares when designing new space stations. Ideally most parts on a new spacestation will be printed on the same printers that will be carried on board. In case of large parts allow for a replaced to be printed from multiple smaller parts and bolted together.

Sparing is a big problem. The MIT analysis of Mars One’s mission design cited its failure to adequately account for sparing needs as probably a fatal flaw. Additive manufacturing could go a long way toward resolving it.

If NASA doesn't wish to use the 3D Printer the ESA it seems has their own program.  They believe in it, and it looks like the ISS in the future will have two printers?
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1288632#msg1288632


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Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #14 on: 11/18/2014 11:08 PM »
1-If NASA doesn't wish to use the 3D Printer

2-the ESA it seems has their own program.  They believe in it...

SNIP


1-NASA is funding this experiment. There is no reason to conclude "they don't wish to use it." But it is an experiment. 3D printing in general has to prove itself as a useful technology. And for any piece of equipment going on the ISS the standard of proof is high. You cannot substitute a new part and then have it kill somebody.

2-ESA is doing the same thing NASA is doing. There is no reason to conclude that NASA doesn't believe in 3D printing and ESA does. They are doing experiments.

3)NASA is ahead of the game on this. ESA is playing catch-up.

You may research the materials and come to a different conclusion.   

3) ESA may leapfrog with a superior printer.

1) NASA invested an extensive amount of money into their first printer that has a sorted past.  Currently, some patent lawsuits regarding that printer are in the court(s).   The guts of the printer was highly advanced when it first came out of China.  I was one of the first, if not the first in the USA to test samples.   Today, the printer is highly mass produced.  Office Depot offers a print service (local) with the printer, Staples and other stores sell it under different labels.  On eBay some of the first generation of this printer have been sold for $300.  Retail is around $1200.00 US.

Its a decent printer to make parts.   That being said, the NASA program being built around it (watch the videos) is not about printing parts for the ISS; rather its some NASA Education program.

After watching the videos that came out promoting this Made in space program I felt I'd seen this before somewhere.  Then it hit me, the movie Armageddon.  In that movie NASA spent a ton of money for bells and whistles to make an advanced drill :(
« Last Edit: 11/19/2014 01:45 PM by Prober »
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Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #15 on: 11/21/2014 02:59 PM »
1-If NASA doesn't wish to use the 3D Printer

2-the ESA it seems has their own program.  They believe in it...

SNIP


1-NASA is funding this experiment. There is no reason to conclude "they don't wish to use it." But it is an experiment. 3D printing in general has to prove itself as a useful technology. And for any piece of equipment going on the ISS the standard of proof is high. You cannot substitute a new part and then have it kill somebody.

2-ESA is doing the same thing NASA is doing. There is no reason to conclude that NASA doesn't believe in 3D printing and ESA does. They are doing experiments.

3)NASA is ahead of the game on this. ESA is playing catch-up.

You may research the materials and come to a different conclusion.   

3) ESA may leapfrog with a superior printer.

1) NASA invested an extensive amount of money into their first printer that has a sorted past.  Currently, some patent lawsuits regarding that printer are in the court(s).   The guts of the printer was highly advanced when it first came out of China.  I was one of the first, if not the first in the USA to test samples.   Today, the printer is highly mass produced.  Office Depot offers a print service (local) with the printer, Staples and other stores sell it under different labels.  On eBay some of the first generation of this printer have been sold for $300.  Retail is around $1200.00 US.

Its a decent printer to make parts.   That being said, the NASA program being built around it (watch the videos) is not about printing parts for the ISS; rather its some NASA Education program.

After watching the videos that came out promoting this Made in space program I felt I'd seen this before somewhere.  Then it hit me, the movie Armageddon.  In that movie NASA spent a ton of money for bells and whistles to make an advanced drill :(


I honestly cannot figure out what your point is.

You twisted my words "they don't wish to use it.".   
 ;D

Watch the video and make a list of the goals, and claims.  This is NOT about making some quick fix parts for the ISS.


« Last Edit: 11/21/2014 03:58 PM by Prober »
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Offline IslandPlaya

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #16 on: 11/21/2014 10:41 PM »
Come on Blackstar...
You are in the know, and everyone respects this.
In response you should say 'unsubstantiated'
;)


Offline Moe Grills

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #18 on: 11/26/2014 08:07 PM »
  Forget the fruitless argument above; history is being made.
The first articles to be manufactured aboard an space station.

I hope the outcome will be better than for the gallium-arsenide crystal manufacturing experiments once carried out on the shuttles.

Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #19 on: 11/28/2014 12:48 PM »
  Forget the fruitless argument above; history is being made.
The first articles to be manufactured aboard an space station.

I hope the outcome will be better than for the gallium-arsenide crystal manufacturing experiments once carried out on the shuttles.

agree 100%

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33141.msg1293386#msg1293386


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Offline Razvan

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #20 on: 12/19/2014 02:24 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30549341

Nasa emails spanner to space station - it's started already... wow

Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #21 on: 12/19/2014 03:12 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30549341

Nasa emails spanner to space station - it's started already... wow

A real world use of the application ;)
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Offline Blackstar

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #22 on: 12/22/2014 05:49 PM »
Keep in mind that this is an experiment. The printer and the parts are not part of operations on the ISS. Nobody is authorized to, say, actually make stuff and then use it for critical tasks. Doing that would require an approval process. And this printer will be removed from the ISS glovebox at some point.

Made In Space hopes that they will fly a version 2 printer that will be installed on the Kibo module and that one will actually be approved for making operational parts for in-orbit use. I think they'll have to jump through a bunch of hoops to get there, but it's not inconceivable that it will happen.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #23 on: 12/23/2014 03:00 AM »
There already is a certification process that Made In Space goes through for printing stuff on ISS.

The 3D printer has been a big success. I guarantee it will be used in the future. There are times when an improvised solution is needed. In the past, the solution is duct tape and flight manuals, which hardly are "certified" solutions. A 3D printer, well-characterized by their work right now and with an identical printer on the ground, is much better characterized than basically all of the adhoc solutions that have been used in space (Apollo 13, repairing the lunar rover fender, STS-120's cuff link, etc, etc etc... each ISS Expedition has stories of ad hoc repairs).
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #24 on: 12/23/2014 07:45 PM »
Agree with both Blackstar & Robo

My view differs.....its a cheap insurance policy for the crew.   A clean, simple focused program can be a useful addition to the ISS.

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Offline Blackstar

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #25 on: 12/23/2014 10:33 PM »
1-There already is a certification process that Made In Space goes through for printing stuff on ISS.

2-The 3D printer has been a big success. I guarantee it will be used in the future. There are times when an improvised solution is needed. In the past, the solution is duct tape and flight manuals, which hardly are "certified" solutions. A 3D printer, well-characterized by their work right now and with an identical printer on the ground, is much better characterized than basically all of the adhoc solutions that have been used in space (Apollo 13, repairing the lunar rover fender, STS-120's cuff link, etc, etc etc... each ISS Expedition has stories of ad hoc repairs).

1-Different process. That is to certify that the printer is safe and poses no unacceptable hazard to the astronauts or the station. It's not the same as certifying the objects it produces for use on the station.

2-Big success? Based upon what evidence? They have not even finished testing and produced a final report and delivered it to NASA. In fact, a major part of the experiment involves bringing the things it makes back to Earth where they can be tested in comparison to objects produced on the ground. For instance, are they as strong? Do they have voids or weaknesses as a result of zero gravity?

I'll take your guarantee with a grain of salt. Only after they've done a systems level assessment will they know if it fits into ISS requirements. For example, if the printer and feedstock prove to be heavier than the items that it replaces and requires more maintenance and human resources to operate, then it may not be carried. Don't put the cart in front of the horse.

It's an experiment.
« Last Edit: 12/23/2014 10:34 PM by Blackstar »

Offline Blackstar

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #26 on: 12/24/2014 03:49 PM »
And here:

http://www.space.com/28095-3d-printer-space-station-ratchet-wrench.html

"The 3D printer aboard the International Space Station has wrapped up the first phase of its orbital test run by cranking out a ratchet wrench whose design was beamed up from Earth.

The wrench, along with the 19 other objects built by the orbiting 3D printer thus far, will travel to Earth early next year, where engineers will compare the objects with ground samples produced by the same machine before it launched, NASA officials said.

"We can't wait to get these objects home and put them through structural and mechanical testing," Quincy Bean, of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, said in a statement. "We really won't know how well this process worked in space until we inspect the parts and complete these tests."

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #27 on: 12/24/2014 04:38 PM »
And here:

http://www.space.com/28095-3d-printer-space-station-ratchet-wrench.html

"The 3D printer aboard the International Space Station has wrapped up the first phase of its orbital test run by cranking out a ratchet wrench whose design was beamed up from Earth.

The wrench, along with the 19 other objects built by the orbiting 3D printer thus far, will travel to Earth early next year, where engineers will compare the objects with ground samples produced by the same machine before it launched, NASA officials said.

"We can't wait to get these objects home and put them through structural and mechanical testing," Quincy Bean, of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, said in a statement. "We really won't know how well this process worked in space until we inspect the parts and complete these tests."

Early next year would be the return of CRS-5.

3-D printing in Space could be a major technology upset to the space industry.  Instead of manufacturing the bulk of a satellite on the ground, feedstock would be shipped up along with a few more complex items like computer chips and circuit boards.  Manufacturing of specific parts and assembly would then take place in such as the Bigelow 2100 assembly bay. This swap from expensive integration and high risk of loss due to a launch failure could easily turn the industry on its ear. Transport to space becomes feedstock and mass produced complex electronics parts.  Once the satellite finishes production and checkout it is then transported to GEO or whatever orbit by a SEP tug or other capable tug. This would be a complete change of how things are done.  Eventually feedstock could be provided from the moon or asteroid sources producing still more revolutions in the satellite industry.

Offline savuporo

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #28 on: 12/24/2014 07:58 PM »
3-D printing in Space could be a major technology upset to the space industry.  .. Once the satellite finishes production and checkout it is then transported to GEO or whatever orbit by a SEP tug or other capable tug...
I dont think 3d printing is the enabling technology for that. In theory, you could send up feedstock of parts today to assemble and check out orbital assets. Printing by itself is not the enabler, as you cant print out a functioning GEO comsat anyway. It needs to be put together.
You would need something like DARPA Phoenix ideas first, i.e. remote operated in space assembly, to which 3d printing can become complementary asset.

3D printing would not directly enable you to build a better and cheaper JWST, whereas remote assembly would.
« Last Edit: 12/24/2014 08:03 PM by savuporo »
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline Blackstar

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #29 on: 12/29/2014 09:41 PM »


3-D printing in Space could be a major technology upset to the space industry. 

These people were skeptical.

Offline savuporo

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #30 on: 12/29/2014 09:47 PM »
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline francesco nicoli

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #31 on: 12/29/2014 10:29 PM »
did you read the article?

"the first of this kind IN CHINA".

Offline catdlr

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #32 on: 04/08/2015 08:03 PM »
Space Station Live: Space-Made Presents Unboxed

Published on Apr 8, 2015
The products from the first-ever operation of a 3-D Printer in space were recently returned to Earth from the International Space Station, and NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing Project opened the box this week. Quincy Bean, the principal investigator of the 3-D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration, talks you through the unboxing at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL on April 6, 2015.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #33 on: 08/20/2015 10:03 AM »
Made In Space have an updated website.

http://www.madeinspace.us/projects/

A couple of interesting additions.

1) R3DO (pronounced riːˈdu) is the codename for our zero-gravity material recycler. R3DO was designed so that material from waste products or previous prints could be melted down and turned back into 3D printing feedstock, considerably enhancing the sustainability and overall efficiency of off-world additive manufacturing

Material recycler which should make its way to ISS at some stage in future. Besides recycling printed items, I think plan is also to recycle packaging from supplies sent to ISS. This may require a change of packaging material but at least it will find a second use.

2) The Extended Structures Additive Manufacturing Machine (ESAMM) will create struts and beams of indefinite length, an ability not possible with current launch methods. Assembling and connecting these long beams together will make the construction of kilometer-scale scaffolding and structural elements possible. ESAMM technology will help humanity realize the long-held dream of building extremely large structures in space.

Looks like Made In Space has copied  Tethers Unlimited Trusselator concept.
http://3dprint.com/31075/tethers-unlimited-trusselator/

Made in space's ESAMM is a step a head of Trusselator as ESAMM is based on flight proven printing technology. MIS have already proven they can print on ISS and in vacuum on ground using a similar printer, next step is to actually print in vacuum of space.
Given their new partnership with Nanoracks to build cubesats in space (ISS for now), I can see the ESAMM being used to make large solar arrays or antennas for these cubesats. See Trusselator article.
Nanoracks has customer base and probably more importantly the money to push this technology. Of course none of this would be possible without NASA support and ISS.

http://3dprint.com/88514/made-in-space-and-nanoracks-sign-deal-to-build-and-deploy-cubesats-in-orbit/



Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #34 on: 02/03/2016 01:29 AM »
Magna Parva have developed 3D printer to print large in space structures.
This is 3rd company that I know doing this see above post.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/02/02/magna-parva-launches-inspace-manufacturing-website/

Offline mvpel

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #35 on: 04/11/2016 09:14 PM »
Houston, We Have a Printer - Raytheon's newest 3-D printing job: Training aids for astronauts

The astronauts of Apollo 13 had a life-threatening problem to solve. They had to move from the command module to the lunar module, and their carbon dioxide scrubbers – little filters that make the air breathable – weren't fitting quite right. The scrubbers were circular, and the space they needed to fit was square.

On the ground, engineers hurrying to help grabbed things they knew the astronauts had on board – in this case, socks and duct tape – and worked out a solution. The scene was dramatized in the movie "Apollo 13," but it's exactly the sort of thing mission control does to this day.

"That really happens," said Randal Lindner, a Raytheon program director who oversees the company's operations, maintenance and engineering work at NASA training facilities.

That program includes a team at the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility, which hosts full-scale replicas of the International Space Station, the Orion capsule and commercial spacecraft. Now, the center has a modern complement to the old socks-and-duct tape solution: a trio of 3-D printers that churn out fast, cheap and highly accurate models of actual spacecraft parts.

“3-D printers allow us to build parts that might have been prohibitively expensive before,” said Bobby Vincent, who runs Raytheon's special projects for NASA. “A real part from an original manufacturer may have taken six months and $3,000 to acquire before. Now it's available on the same day for $30. This capability enables a wider range of practice, trainings and testing ‘what if’ scenarios.”

The printers are part of Raytheon's companywide push into additive manufacturing and 3-D printing. That includes rocket motors, conductive materials for for electrical circuits, housings for the company's revolutionary gallium nitride transmitters and fins for guided artillery shells.

Duct tape and socks are still in NASA’s toolbox, but the technology for helping solve problems for space has advanced.

“We printed 1/20th scale copies of the robotic arm found on the space station,” Vincent said. “The models move at all the same angles as the real thing, which allows astronauts to take them back to their desks to develop procedures for their next spacewalk.”


This composite photo shows a 3-D printed version of a robotic arm on the International Space Station,
set against the backdrop of the actual thing. Astronauts and engineers use cheap and easily produced
3-D printed mockups to develop and practice procedures for maintaining and repairing spacecraft.
(Background image: NASA photo)


The vehicle mockups are painstakingly faithful to actual spacecraft, right down to models of science experiments astronauts have conducted on board. The 3-D printers help achieve that authenticity, offering a quick and inexpensive way to ensure the training versions reflect the actual spacecraft exactly. That's important for the thousands of training exercises that take place every year at the training center, where astronauts practice everything from routine maintenance to handling potentially catastrophic emergencies..

The construction and maintenance of the Orion spacecraft mockup is among 100 special projects Raytheon delivers to NASA and commercial customers at the space center every year. Many of those projects are geared toward developing ultra-efficient procedures and preparing both astronauts and mission control to handle whatever happens in space.

“I love turning on the news, seeing something great happening in space and knowing Raytheon had a pivotal role in making it happen,” said Lindner.

The outlook for 3-D printers in human spaceflight is good. The International Space Station itself has a 3-D printer that is already producing usable tools.

On the ground, the 3-D printers at the mockup facilty are producing valves, hinges and latches for the Orion spacecraft mockup. Some of the parts are printed in clear plastic to give engineers an unobstructed look at what's underneath certain components. That, in turn, helps them develop new procedures for servicing both current and future spacecraft.

In the shorter term, the 3-D printers will also help commercial companies making their maiden voyages into space.

“We are starting to see more requests to build mockups for commercial space vehicles,” said Vincent. “The whole space enterprise is rapidly evolving, which is sure to keep our 3-D printers running.”

This document does not contain technology or technical data controlled under either the U.S. International Traffic in Arms Regulations or the U.S. Export Administration Regulations. E16-H5V5.
"Ugly programs are like ugly suspension bridges: they're much more liable to collapse than pretty ones, because the way humans (especially engineer-humans) perceive beauty is intimately related to our ability to process and understand complexity. A language that makes it hard to write elegant code makes it hard to write good code." - Eric S. Raymond

Offline Dante2121

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #36 on: 08/13/2016 02:04 PM »
Next year Made in Space is going to start trial manufacturing ZBLAN on the ISS.

http://www.engineering.com/3DPrinting/3DPrintingArticles/ArticleID/12662/Made-In-Space-to-Make-Fiber-Optics-in-Space.aspx

This is really cool because the material is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars per kilogram - e.g.it could be wildly profitable even with today's launch costs.

https://sites.google.com/site/cmapproject/case-studies/exotic-glasses-and-fibers

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #37 on: 08/14/2016 01:13 AM »
Next year Made in Space is going to start trial manufacturing ZBLAN on the ISS.

http://www.engineering.com/3DPrinting/3DPrintingArticles/ArticleID/12662/Made-In-Space-to-Make-Fiber-Optics-in-Space.aspx

This is really cool because the material is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars per kilogram - e.g.it could be wildly profitable even with today's launch costs.

https://sites.google.com/site/cmapproject/case-studies/exotic-glasses-and-fibers
You are correct this could be a very profitable business case. If a single dedicated Dragon flight to the ISS per year carrying the ingots and empty spools ~(1.5mt) (cost to Made in Space $130M) and then returns with the finished filled spools of fiber they could make in profit in one year from $200M to $650M each year from a single production machine.

The added item here is no one else would be able to even come close to the quality of fibers or their continuous length for the cost. They could even undercut the normal Earth manufactured market putting them all out of business. At such profit levels and a general lowering of prices increasing the demand for more fiber they could lease a BA330 just to manufacture fiber. This could be easily a multi-Billion-$ Made in Space business.

A single machine producing 3km of fiber per hour could produce in one year 25,000km of fiber worth from $7.5B to $75B. Number of Dragon cargo flights to support this manufacturing rate at 1.5mt per flight would be 5.5 flights per year.

Offline MarkM

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #38 on: 08/18/2016 01:50 PM »

[/quote]
You are correct this could be a very profitable business case. If a single dedicated Dragon flight to the ISS per year carrying the ingots and empty spools ~(1.5mt) (cost to Made in Space $130M) and then returns with the finished filled spools of fiber they could make in profit in one year from $200M to $650M each year from a single production machine.

The added item here is no one else would be able to even come close to the quality of fibers or their continuous length for the cost. They could even undercut the normal Earth manufactured market putting them all out of business. At such profit levels and a general lowering of prices increasing the demand for more fiber they could lease a BA330 just to manufacture fiber. This could be easily a multi-Billion-$ Made in Space business.

A single machine producing 3km of fiber per hour could produce in one year 25,000km of fiber worth from $7.5B to $75B. Number of Dragon cargo flights to support this manufacturing rate at 1.5mt per flight would be 5.5 flights per year.
[/quote]

I think this is the type of commercialization that will really get the cost of access to space down.  When the cost of accessing space becomes another cost of production, there will be a natural economic need to reduce that cost (and improve reliability) that will then allow other activities in space to be more viable.


Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #39 on: 08/18/2016 03:44 PM »

Quote
You are correct this could be a very profitable business case. If a single dedicated Dragon flight to the ISS per year carrying the ingots and empty spools ~(1.5mt) (cost to Made in Space $130M) and then returns with the finished filled spools of fiber they could make in profit in one year from $200M to $650M each year from a single production machine.

The added item here is no one else would be able to even come close to the quality of fibers or their continuous length for the cost. They could even undercut the normal Earth manufactured market putting them all out of business. At such profit levels and a general lowering of prices increasing the demand for more fiber they could lease a BA330 just to manufacture fiber. This could be easily a multi-Billion-$ Made in Space business.

A single machine producing 3km of fiber per hour could produce in one year 25,000km of fiber worth from $7.5B to $75B. Number of Dragon cargo flights to support this manufacturing rate at 1.5mt per flight would be 5.5 flights per year.

I think this is the type of commercialization that will really get the cost of access to space down.  When the cost of accessing space becomes another cost of production, there will be a natural economic need to reduce that cost (and improve reliability) that will then allow other activities in space to be more viable.
By increasing the Dragon load to 3mt per flight and at a cheaper per flight price (reused 1st stage and reused propulsive landing D2) they could get the price per meter down to $30/m from for high quality fiber from the current cost of $3,000/m. This would change the demand for such fiber from a small quantity for use in just the lasers to transmission lines. By being able to consistently manufacture long high quality fiber at lengths of 15km they could create a new demand for the fiber in very large quantities greater the the amount of 25,000km per year value discussed above. At $30/m the revenue from fiber for D2 flights delivering 3mt  each and 2 machine producing 50,000km would be reduced from the above values to only $1.5B but would be a growth  yr-to-yr requiring more production machines and more Dragon flights. That $1.5B revenue minus the costs of D2 flights and the year rental of a BA330 ($650M) leaves a profit /yr of $355M (24% profit margin). No one else on Earth could compete with the price or be able to manufacture the quality or lengths of continuous fiber.

Added:
Here is an analysis of the business case for full scale transmission fiber production for a wholesale price of $15/m:
Fiber produced per year300000kilometers/year
Number of D2 cargo flights per year33flights/year
Cost per D2 flight using reused 1st stage and D2$90MSpaceX price/flight
Total cost of all cargo flights per year$2,970Mcargo cost /year
Cost of BA330 rental per year$650MBigelow rental price/year
Cost of 6 continuous crew on orbit + transport per year$192Mcrew costs/year
Wholesale price of fiber  per meter$15Wholesale price/meter
Revenue from fiber sale per year$4,500Mrevenue/year
Profit per year$688Mprofit/year
profit margin15%
« Last Edit: 08/18/2016 05:22 PM by oldAtlas_Eguy »

Offline Prober

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #40 on: 08/24/2016 04:08 PM »
Do we have enough surplus energy for this manufacturing proposed?
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Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #41 on: 08/25/2016 05:34 PM »
Do we have enough surplus energy for this manufacturing proposed?
The energy requirement looks to be the heating of the source material and then the cooling of the fiber. So to produce the amounts at the rates being discussed by MIS, it should not take much power in a % value of that available on ISS or even on a more power constrained BA330 module. These are small NAROO (no assembly required on orbit) rack mount boxes that are doing the work not some large built up system. To produce from 6 to 14 km of fiber a 2 kg block of source material is what is being brought to a melting point. It takes ~20Mj to melt the 2 kg block and that is equivelent to just ~6 kwh. Meaning to also cool it would require 12kwh to produce the entire fiber from the source block. If the unit only pulls 200w it would take ~60hours (2 1/2 days) to produce the complete fiber.

So the amount of power used by these boxes is almost trivial to the other power requirements of the ISS or other space-station such as a BA330.

A BTW that 6km of fiber at $300/m let alone the $3000/m price is worth $1.8M. At $3,000/m it is worth $18M.
« Last Edit: 08/25/2016 05:38 PM by oldAtlas_Eguy »

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #42 on: 09/23/2016 04:27 PM »

http://www.spacedaily.com/m/reports/UK_Ministry_Of_Defence_increases_investment_in_Magna_Parva_in_space_manufacturing_technology_999.html

Current pre-manufactured structures (antennae, solar arrays, deployment booms) designed to go into space are high in mass and volume, and have specific launch environment requirements. By manufacturing in space, many of these requirements are eliminated, offering an order of magnitude capability increase over current state of the art systems. Based on a deployed length to packed volume ratio of greater than 1000:1, the Magna Parva market disruptive technology can offer a new and unexplored utility from even small satellites.

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #43 on: 12/28/2016 06:20 PM »
New related story that suggests that to support expanded in-space manufacturing the down-mass capabilities (to get the manufactured goods to the largest market) will need to expand greatly.

http://spacenews.com/space-manufacturing-and-the-last-mile/

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #44 on: 01/24/2017 08:47 AM »
Made in Space partnership with Axiom.

https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/made-space-explain-3d-printing-advancing-space-industry-103818/

Looks like 3D printing in space may actually be a via business.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #45 on: 04/22/2017 02:22 PM »
Made In Space are keeping busy with these 3 proposals.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2017/04/21/space-selected-nasa-small-business-awards/

The one printing high quality optical devices has highest probably of being real money spinner.
« Last Edit: 04/22/2017 02:22 PM by TrevorMonty »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #46 on: 05/06/2017 02:38 PM »
Quote
Made In Space: Manufacturing fiber optic cable could become the first space-based industry

MAY 4, 2017 BY KENDRA R CHAMBERLAIN

https://thedownlink.co/2017/05/04/made-in-space-manufacturing-fiber-optic-cable-could-become-the-first-space-based-industry/

Includes:

Quote
Made In Space has built what it calls a “miniature fiber-pulling machine” that’s about the size of a microwave oven, which will be flown to the International Space Station (ISS) later this summer on SpaceX’s Dragon.

So CRS 12 I assume?

Offline rberry

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #47 on: 05/06/2017 04:33 PM »
Quote
Made In Space: Manufacturing fiber optic cable could become the first space-based industry

MAY 4, 2017 BY KENDRA R CHAMBERLAIN

https://thedownlink.co/2017/05/04/made-in-space-manufacturing-fiber-optic-cable-could-become-the-first-space-based-industry/

Includes:

Quote
Made In Space has built what it calls a “miniature fiber-pulling machine” that’s about the size of a microwave oven, which will be flown to the International Space Station (ISS) later this summer on SpaceX’s Dragon.

So CRS 12 I assume?

Yes.

http://www.spacestationresearch.com/research-on-station/projects/?wpv_view_count=3152-TCPID1536&wpv_post_search=OFPIM&project-status%5B%5D=&wpv-category=0&project-location-state%5B%5D=&wpv_filter_submit=Search
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Offline deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #48 on: 05/11/2017 07:47 PM »
Noticed this in the Expedition 51 thread, from an ISS update dated April 28th:

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Shield Installation:  The crew ingressed the BEAM and installed a Radiation Environment Monitor (REM) shield onto the REM sensor. This shield is a 1.1 mm thick component produced by the 3D printer on the ISS.  BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS.  Expandable habitats greatly decrease the amount of transport volume required for future space missions. These “expandables” weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module while allowing additional space for living and working. They also provide protection from solar and cosmic radiation, space debris, and other contaminants. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations could possibly use them as habitable structures.
This was the first time that I had heard of the ISS crew printing a part to use on station instead of as a comparison to a ground-made part.  Are others aware of other examples?
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #49 on: 05/13/2017 02:11 AM »
In-Space industrialization is just a small step away.

For large amounts a DragonLab dedicated flight could produce quite a lot of fiber per flight. I believe the data was that 1 kg of source equates to 3km of fiber. So for 1 mt of fiber manufactured in a 2mt plant would produce 3,000,000 meters of fiber. At a sale price of $100/meter (that is less than the current price for the worst quality fiber) the revenue would be $300M. The cost of the flight of both the Dragon2 and F9 (both of which are reused) at about $100M/flight results in $200M profit. Because of the enormous amount of fiber this represents is why I used just $100/m for this supper quality fiber instead of its value when very little of it is available of $3,000/m.

If I had used the $3,000/m the revenue from a single flight would be $3B!!!!!!!!!!!!

So there is a lot of room for high costs of space travel.

With a Manned station the Dragons would transport just source and bring back finished fiber rolls ~3mt of fiber for support of prices as low as $30/M for $270M in revenue /flight. Enough to pay for not only the supply flights but for a pair of astronauts and the rental of a space station if 12 Dragon fiber delivery flights per year were made to the factory resulting in 108,000km of fiber produced per year at $30/m is $3.24B  in fiber. If all space launch costs are $2B then profit /yr would be $1.2B.

This could literally catapult a small company into a big player.


Offline cartman

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #50 on: 05/23/2017 08:26 PM »
How much energy is needed in order to run the fiber making machine?

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #51 on: 05/26/2017 07:53 PM »
How much energy is needed in order to run the fiber making machine?
Quote from one of my previous posts which answered this question:
Do we have enough surplus energy for this manufacturing proposed?
The energy requirement looks to be the heating of the source material and then the cooling of the fiber. So to produce the amounts at the rates being discussed by MIS, it should not take much power in a % value of that available on ISS or even on a more power constrained BA330 module. These are small NAROO (no assembly required on orbit) rack mount boxes that are doing the work not some large built up system. To produce from 6 to 14 km of fiber a 2 kg block of source material is what is being brought to a melting point. It takes ~20Mj to melt the 2 kg block and that is equivelent to just ~6 kwh. Meaning to also cool it would require 12kwh to produce the entire fiber from the source block. If the unit only pulls 200w it would take ~60hours (2 1/2 days) to produce the complete fiber.

So the amount of power used by these boxes is almost trivial to the other power requirements of the ISS or other space-station such as a BA330.

A BTW that 6km of fiber at $300/m let alone the $3000/m price is worth $1.8M. At $3,000/m it is worth $18M.

Offline cartman

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #52 on: 05/27/2017 02:17 AM »
Thanks for your answer. So this seems very viable and truly a way to kickstart a space economy.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #53 on: 06/06/2017 12:53 AM »


http://spaceangels.com/post/beam-celebrates-birthday-receives-3d-printed-radiation-shielding

Excellent article from Space Angels with lots of interesting links.

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk


Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #54 on: 06/07/2017 02:23 PM »


http://spaceangels.com/post/beam-celebrates-birthday-receives-3d-printed-radiation-shielding

Excellent article from Space Angels with lots of interesting links.

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk
Thanks for pointing out the article.

It shows that the commercial industry has started the first big step in being able to manufacture in space prototypes to test without having to build them and then launch them from Earth. This saves time and money for prototype/space innovations. As the ability to manufacture in space larger/more complex and even metallic objects the acceleration of space innovations will start to show some payback for commercial space industry in increased capabilities for much lower costs.

Offline deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #55 on: 06/09/2017 08:17 AM »
From Expedition 51 thread:
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/29/2017

Posted on May 29, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Manufacturing Device (MD): The Manufacturing Device failed to complete the 12 hour print of a Radiation Environment Monitoring shield on Friday and during a second attempt yesterday. The REM shield was to be installed in the BEAM during ingress later this week. The Made-In-Space team is assessing the anomaly.  The MD – Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) enables the production of components on the ISS to meet both NASA and commercial objectives.  Parts, entire experiments, and tools can be created on demand utilizing the AMF.  The AMF is capable of producing parts using a wide variety of thermopolymers, including engineered plastics.

Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline Mariusuiram

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #56 on: 07/03/2017 06:31 PM »
In-Space industrialization is just a small step away.

For large amounts a DragonLab dedicated flight could produce quite a lot of fiber per flight. I believe the data was that 1 kg of source equates to 3km of fiber. So for 1 mt of fiber manufactured in a 2mt plant would produce 3,000,000 meters of fiber. At a sale price of $100/meter (that is less than the current price for the worst quality fiber) the revenue would be $300M. The cost of the flight of both the Dragon2 and F9 (both of which are reused) at about $100M/flight results in $200M profit. Because of the enormous amount of fiber this represents is why I used just $100/m for this supper quality fiber instead of its value when very little of it is available of $3,000/m.

If I had used the $3,000/m the revenue from a single flight would be $3B!!!!!!!!!!!!

So there is a lot of room for high costs of space travel.

I think the key consideration is scale and market size. Previous calculations about running a massive fiber production operation in space assume there is unlimited demand for this ultra-high quality fiber at current prices. Most likely there is not and the price is linked to the volume.

If a company wants to target that ultra-high quality fiber market, it will probably do small scale production on the ISS or in some other shared format.

If the goal is to create thousands+ km of this for applications where it is replacing an existing silica fiber, the price of the product should be more in line with existing costs. There is not some urgent life threatening need to replace all our fiber optics. But if the cost is comparable, upgrades will happen (or within reason at least).  From looking online (assuming the # of fibers should be multiplied by the length) I see bulk fiber in the $1 to $2/meter range if calculating it per fiber not per cable.

Point is there is a need to understand the market size of the various sub-markets in terms of finished product.

So there might be a market for 5-10 kg of fiber spooling in space at prices that make it viable. But then order of magnitude cost reductions required to access markets with fiber demand in terms of tons. This all isn't necessarily a bad thing or to imply its impossible, just a reminder of natural market dynamics.
« Last Edit: 07/03/2017 06:36 PM by Mariusuiram »

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #57 on: 07/07/2017 01:50 PM »
In-Space industrialization is just a small step away.

For large amounts a DragonLab dedicated flight could produce quite a lot of fiber per flight. I believe the data was that 1 kg of source equates to 3km of fiber. So for 1 mt of fiber manufactured in a 2mt plant would produce 3,000,000 meters of fiber. At a sale price of $100/meter (that is less than the current price for the worst quality fiber) the revenue would be $300M. The cost of the flight of both the Dragon2 and F9 (both of which are reused) at about $100M/flight results in $200M profit. Because of the enormous amount of fiber this represents is why I used just $100/m for this supper quality fiber instead of its value when very little of it is available of $3,000/m.

If I had used the $3,000/m the revenue from a single flight would be $3B!!!!!!!!!!!!

So there is a lot of room for high costs of space travel.

I think the key consideration is scale and market size. Previous calculations about running a massive fiber production operation in space assume there is unlimited demand for this ultra-high quality fiber at current prices. Most likely there is not and the price is linked to the volume.

If a company wants to target that ultra-high quality fiber market, it will probably do small scale production on the ISS or in some other shared format.

If the goal is to create thousands+ km of this for applications where it is replacing an existing silica fiber, the price of the product should be more in line with existing costs. There is not some urgent life threatening need to replace all our fiber optics. But if the cost is comparable, upgrades will happen (or within reason at least).  From looking online (assuming the # of fibers should be multiplied by the length) I see bulk fiber in the $1 to $2/meter range if calculating it per fiber not per cable.

Point is there is a need to understand the market size of the various sub-markets in terms of finished product.

So there might be a market for 5-10 kg of fiber spooling in space at prices that make it viable. But then order of magnitude cost reductions required to access markets with fiber demand in terms of tons. This all isn't necessarily a bad thing or to imply its impossible, just a reminder of natural market dynamics.
Once you get to bulk replacement of silica fibers the following is used to calculate the business model for the price of the ZBLAM. A ZBLAM fiber has less loss/m than silica requiring fewer repeaters. A ZBLAM fiber has 10X the data capability than a silica fiber. So even at 10X times the price of silica it is more cost advantageous on a $/bit basis to replace silica cables with ZBLAM cables to increase the cables data rate capability than to add more silica fibers when ZBLAM fibers are at <$20/m price. At $20/m that equates to for source and finished product weight of 1kg $60,000/kg ($20/m*3000m/kg=$60,000/kg). At current costs for launch of 3,000kg and its return at $150M, launch cost to revenue is $150M transport to and from orbit costs to $180M in revenue. In this case profit will be  small as there will be other costs. As it stands currently with the use of ISS and costs of transport of the MIS hardware and its tending/maintenance/operation this low $/m value is not reachable. But lower the cost of transport and the business case starts to become stronger for bulk strands manufacture in space.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #58 on: 08/09/2017 10:18 AM »
Made in space Archinaut: In-space Robotics"
This is 3d printing in space.



The only limit on structure size is feed stock and Archinaut reliability.
« Last Edit: 08/09/2017 10:18 AM by TrevorMonty »

Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Offline deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #60 on: 09/25/2017 09:34 PM »
Whole series of papers from AIAA Space 2017 on this topic:

NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing Project: Toward a Multimaterial Fabrication Laboratory for the International Space Station
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5277

Applications for the Archinaut In Space Manufacturing and Assembly Capability
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5365

Made In Space Archinaut: Key Enabler for Asteroid Belt Colonization
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5364

Archinaut: In-Space Manufacturing and Assembly for Next-Generation Space Habitats
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5227

‘Made for Space and Played in Space’: GravityGames, Microgravity 3D Printer, and Crew on the International Space Station Create a Critical New Space Engagement for STEM Students
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5245
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Offline TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #61 on: 09/26/2017 12:05 AM »
Excellent post.
I knew of few things that Archinaut could enable like large antennas, truss for satellite to attach payloads to.

One of more surprising was huge solar sails capable if delivering 66t to Mars in 700days. I've only thought of deployable solar sails for cubesat mission. This would be one easier things for Archinaut build.

Offline deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #62 on: 10/19/2017 05:59 PM »
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/two-for-the-crew-3-d-design-challenge-seeks-students-to-invent-multi-use-tools

Quote
Sept. 21, 2017

Two for the Crew 3-D Design Challenge Seeks Students to Invent Multi-Use Tools

This fall, NASA and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Foundation are challenging students to use their ingenuity to create a helpful tool that combines the functions of two objects being used by crew aboard the International Space Station.  The national Future Engineers Two for the Crew Challenge provides an exciting opportunity for K-12 students to develop an innovative model intended to be 3-D printed by astronauts on the orbiting laboratory. Students will invent multi-use tools and customized equipment that can help astronauts with maintenance, medical, trash management, and the challenge of securing and storing items in microgravity.

Human exploration of the solar system is currently limited by the need to carry consumables, replace systems and parts, and use available materials. This is why building and maintaining things in space will be important for future missions. Students will learn about the advantages of in-space manufacturing and customization. This means that crew members can print items when they are needed, including specific parts for the unique space station environment.

Participants will explore concepts like mass and volume, while learning engineering and 3-D design skills. Submissions from K-12 students in the United States will be accepted online through Dec. 19 at www.futureengineers.org/twoforthecrew.

Winners will be announced on March 14, 2018.

The Two for the Crew Challenge is free for student participation. The challenge website provides educational information about space station crew tools and brainstorming resources that help students get started with creating their designs. The site also provides links to free 3-D design software.

Two for the Crew is the sixth in a series of space innovation challenges developed by Future Engineers and the ASME Foundation, with technical assistance from NASA.
« Last Edit: 10/19/2017 05:59 PM by deruch »
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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #63 on: 10/20/2017 06:31 AM »
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/centers/marshall/images/refabricator.html

Quote
Aug. 28, 2017

Full Circle: NASA to Demonstrate Refabricator to Recycle, Reuse, Repeat

In 2014, NASA made important progress toward the in-space manufacturing necessary for deep space exploration by “printing” tools in space using a 3-D printer on the International Space Station.

In 2018, the nation's space agency will take the next step toward a sustainable in-space manufacturing capability when it launches a machine that can not only print plastic parts, but can also recycle them back into reusable raw materials to make more and/or different parts.

The machine, coined the “Refabricator,” is a device that will accept plastic materials of various sizes and shapes and turn them in to the feedstock used to 3-D print items. The whole process happens in a single automated machine about the size of a dorm room refrigerator.

"When we begin launching humans to destinations beyond low-Earth orbit, space will be at a premium," said Niki Werkheiser, manager of In-Space Manufacturing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where the device will be thoroughly tested before launching to the space station. "It simply won’t be feasible to send along replacement parts or tools for everything on the spacecraft, and resupplying from Earth is cost and time prohibitive. The Refabricator will be key in demonstrating a sustainable logistics model to fabricate, recycle, and reuse parts and waste materials.” 

NASA awarded a Small Business Innovation Research contract valued at approximately $750,000 to Tethers Unlimited Inc. of Seattle in April 2015, to build the recycling system.

“The Refabricator demonstration is a key advance toward our vision of implementing a truly sustainable, in-space manufacturing ecosystem,” said Rob Hoyt, CEO of TUI. “Astronauts could use this technology to manufacture and recycle food-safe utensils, and turn what is now inconvenient waste into feedstock to help build the next generation of space systems. We believe re-using the waste could reduce the cost and risks for NASA and private space exploration missions.”

The Refabricator will complete final flight certification testing at the Marshall Center in late 2017 and is slated to launch to station in April 2018. Almost all operations will be remotely commanded and controlled from Marshall’s Payload Operations Integration Center – mission control for science on the space station -- and TUI. The ability to remotely manage the process can save astronaut time and provide greater autonomy for future spaceflight missions.

"The space station is the ideal proving ground for this important technology," said Werkheiser. "Astronauts are already living and working in space, a mere 250 miles above Earth. Those crew members are helping make discoveries to benefit humans around the world while testing the important technology, life support systems and medical breakthroughs that will enable long-duration space exploration by humans."

The Refabricator will be the first integrated recycler-manufacturer in orbit and may eventually be able to recycle and print, using metal as well as plastic, with very little monitoring from the station crew members. By 2020, NASA wants to create a Fabrication Laboratory, or FabLab, to test an integrated, multi-material, on-demand system.

"The FabLab would allow astronauts to select what they want or need from a catalogue of parts and then simply push a button to have it made," said Werkheiser.

This project is an ideal example of how government and small businesses can effectively work together. In this example, NASA and TUI worked hand-in-hand in the rapid development of a brand new technology for in-space applications. NASA provided guidance and insight on how to design the system to successfully meet the stringent space flight certification, safety, and operations constraints.

NASA continues to leverage open competition, including crowd-sourcing, Small Business Innovation Research awards, Broad Agency Announcements, and challenge competitions, to collaborate and meet space needs for space exploration.

For more information about the Small Business Innovation Research program, visit:  https://sbir.nasa.gov
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