Author Topic: Quantum Computing & Artificial Intelligence  (Read 17640 times)

Offline johnnyhinbos01

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #20 on: 12/03/2015 08:30 PM »
It's my understanding that QC's biggest energy consumption is in the intense cooling system needed to get operating temps to almost absolute zero. There's one - albeit not entirely compelling - reason to loft a quantum computer into space...

Offline ppnl

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #21 on: 12/04/2015 05:05 PM »
It's my understanding that QC's biggest energy consumption is in the intense cooling system needed to get operating temps to almost absolute zero. There's one - albeit not entirely compelling - reason to loft a quantum computer into space...

D-wave has to be cooled below cryogenic down to 10 mk temps. I'm not sure that has ever been done in space. I can't think why it would have been done. In any case it is far easier to do on the ground making it a compelling reason not to do it in space.

I think the D-wave uses about 25000 watts mostly in cooling. Not really a big issue.

Offline TakeOff

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #22 on: 12/04/2015 06:51 PM »
It's my understanding that QC's biggest energy consumption is in the intense cooling system needed to get operating temps to almost absolute zero. There's one - albeit not entirely compelling - reason to loft a quantum computer into space...
But that is already being taken care of, with diamond crystals or cold fusion magnets or whatever. That hurdle is already being taken care of, very systematically. I don't advocate QC in space or predict it, It indeed looks very impractical and requires a value added I cannot account for. I just mention that the connection between QC and space has been made that way by others.

I personally actually think that quantum computers will turn out to become a huge disappointment. We'll have them, but be none the wiser with them either, I'm sorry.

Offline ppnl

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #23 on: 12/04/2015 07:37 PM »


I personally actually think that quantum computers will turn out to become a huge disappointment. We'll have them, but be none the wiser with them either, I'm sorry.

Really? Why? Do you think they will not be more powerful than ordinary computers?

Offline Star One

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Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #24 on: 12/04/2015 11:13 PM »
It's my understanding that QC's biggest energy consumption is in the intense cooling system needed to get operating temps to almost absolute zero. There's one - albeit not entirely compelling - reason to loft a quantum computer into space...
But that is already being taken care of, with diamond crystals or cold fusion magnets or whatever. That hurdle is already being taken care of, very systematically. I don't advocate QC in space or predict it, It indeed looks very impractical and requires a value added I cannot account for. I just mention that the connection between QC and space has been made that way by others.

I personally actually think that quantum computers will turn out to become a huge disappointment. We'll have them, but be none the wiser with them either, I'm sorry.

I am not so sure I would be so quick to dismiss them as useless at such an early stage in their development. In fact I can't even see the logic in making such a statement.
« Last Edit: 12/05/2015 08:25 AM by Star One »

Offline MP99

Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #25 on: 12/08/2015 07:12 AM »
It has been suggested that quantum computers be launched to orbit in order to reduce disturbances which cause decoherence.
ISTM more likely that radiation would increase decoherence issues.

Cheers, Martin

Online Johnnyhinbos

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #26 on: 12/08/2015 10:17 AM »
Today is supposed to be NASA,  Google, and D-Wave's watershed announcement... Curious to see what pans out.
John Hanzl. Author, action / adventure www.johnhanzl.com

Offline Star One

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Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #27 on: 12/08/2015 12:07 PM »
Today is supposed to be NASA,  Google, and D-Wave's watershed announcement... Curious to see what pans out.

Same here. Is it being streamed anywhere, NASA TV, as can't see anything on the schedule?
« Last Edit: 12/08/2015 12:09 PM by Star One »

Online Johnnyhinbos

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #28 on: 12/08/2015 07:17 PM »
News is out - and I _think_ it's mind blowing... (But not 100% sure)

http://googleresearch.blogspot.ca/2015/12/when-can-quantum-annealing-win.html?m=1
John Hanzl. Author, action / adventure www.johnhanzl.com

Offline Star One

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« Last Edit: 12/08/2015 08:44 PM by Star One »

Offline ppnl

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #30 on: 12/10/2015 09:33 AM »

Scott Aaronson is not overly impressed by the news:

http://www.scottaaronson.com/blog/

I think the D-Wave approach using quantum simulated annealing is going to be a dead end. Even if it works it is limited and after years they have failed to prove that it works at all. 

Offline Star One

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Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #31 on: 12/10/2015 10:08 AM »

Scott Aaronson is not overly impressed by the news:

http://www.scottaaronson.com/blog/

I think the D-Wave approach using quantum simulated annealing is going to be a dead end. Even if it works it is limited and after years they have failed to prove that it works at all.

I am not sure that blog post says what you think it says. In fact he is quite impressed within the limitations of what the paper demonstrated. He appears to be of the view that it adds weight to the arguments of those combating the quantum computing naysayers.
« Last Edit: 12/10/2015 10:47 AM by Star One »

Offline ppnl

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #32 on: 12/10/2015 06:01 PM »

Scott Aaronson is not overly impressed by the news:

http://www.scottaaronson.com/blog/

I think the D-Wave approach using quantum simulated annealing is going to be a dead end. Even if it works it is limited and after years they have failed to prove that it works at all.

I am not sure that blog post says what you think it says. In fact he is quite impressed within the limitations of what the paper demonstrated. He appears to be of the view that it adds weight to the arguments of those combating the quantum computing naysayers.

He has long been a critic of D-wave claims despite being a defender of quantum computing in general. Here he points out that while d-wave has made important progress they still haven't unambiguously demonstrated quantum speed up. He points out that while the published paper tells it like it is the press release is hype.

He quotes Matthias to say there is real progress"

Quote
Yes, there’s a factor-108 speedup that looks clearly asymptotic in nature, and there’s also a factor-108 speedup over Quantum Monte Carlo.

But then continues the quote pointing out that in context that isn't all that impressive:

Quote
But the asymptotic speedup is only if you compare against simulated annealing, while the speedup over Quantum Monte Carlo is only constant-factor, not asymptotic. And in any case, both speedups disappear if you compare against other classical algorithms, like that of Alex Selby. Also, the constant-factor speedup probably has less to do with quantum mechanics than with the fact that D-Wave built extremely specialized hardware, which was then compared against a classical chip on the problem of simulating the specialized hardware itself (i.e., on Ising spin minimization instances with the topology of D-Wave’s Chimera graph).

The speed up isn't over any possible classical algorithm but only over an algorithm that directly simulates the QC hardware. And the money quote:

Quote
Thus, while there’s been genuine, interesting progress, it remains uncertain whether D-Wave’s approach will lead to speedups over the best known classical algorithms, let alone to speedups over the best known classical algorithms that are also asymptotic or also of practical importance. Indeed, all of these points also remain uncertain for quantum annealing as a whole.

No actual quantum speed up has been shown. Worse it has not been shown that quantum annealing even can have a quantum speed up for any interesting or useful problem. It is a very limited version of quantum computing even at best.



   

Offline Star One

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Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #33 on: 07/27/2016 06:33 AM »
Engineers just made a quantum computer chip work at room temperature

Quote
We have demonstrated that a long conduction electron spin lifetime in metallic-like material made up of carbon nanospheres can be achieved at room temperature.

This material was produced simply by burning naphthalene, the active ingredient in mothballs.

The material is produced as a solid powder and handled in air. It can then be dispersed in ethanol and water solvents, or deposited directly onto a surface like glass. As the material was remarkably homogeneous, the measurements could be made on the bulk solid powder.

This allowed us to achieve a new record electron spin lifetime of 175 nanoseconds at room temperature. This might not sound like a long time, but it exceeds the prerequisite for applications in quantum computing and is about 100 times longer than that found in graphene.

This was possibly due to the materials' self-doping of conduction electrons and their nanometre spatial confinement. This basically means the spheres could be made entirely from carbon while preserving their unique electronic property.

Our work now opens the possibility for spin qubits to be manipulated in a conducting material at room temperature. This method doesn’t need any isotopic engineering of a host material, dilution of the spin-carrying molecule, or cryogenic temperatures.

It allows a higher density packing of qubits to be, in principle, achieved over other promising qubits like those used in silicon.

http://www.sciencealert.com/all-you-need-for-quantum-computing-is-some-mothballs

Paper here.

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160718/ncomms12232/full/ncomms12232.html

And somewhat directly more on topic.

Quote
Following a recent upgrade, the USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center (QCC) based at the USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI) is now the leader in quantum processing capacity.

With the upgrade — to 1,098 qubits from 512 — the D-Wave 2X processor is enabling QCC researchers to continue their efforts to close the gap between academic research in quantum computation and real-world critical problems.

The new processor will be used to study how and whether quantum effects can speed up the solution of tough optimization, machine learning and sampling problems. Machine-learning algorithms are widely used in artificial intelligence tasks.

http://news.usc.edu/104391/worlds-most-powerful-quantum-computer-now-online-at-usc/
« Last Edit: 07/27/2016 06:36 AM by Star One »

Offline Star One

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Offline Star One

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #35 on: 02/03/2017 09:18 PM »
The first ever blueprint for a mind-bendingly massive quantum computer has been released

http://www.sciencealert.com/it-s-happening-scientists-unveil-first-ever-blueprint-for-a-mind-bendingly-massive-quantum-computer

Offline ChrisWilson68

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #36 on: 02/03/2017 09:38 PM »
Engineers just made a quantum computer chip work at room temperature

No, they didn't.  The quote you included directly contradicts that.

What they did do was demonstrate certain properties of a new material that could potentially be used in a quantum computer, and that those properties could potentially enable a quantum computer that works at room temperature in the future.

This is an important step, but let's be realistic and not over-hype it.

Offline Star One

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Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #37 on: 02/03/2017 09:40 PM »
Engineers just made a quantum computer chip work at room temperature

No, they didn't.  The quote you included directly contradicts that.

What they did do was demonstrate certain properties of a new material that could potentially be used in a quantum computer, and that those properties could potentially enable a quantum computer that works at room temperature in the future.

This is an important step, but let's be realistic and not over-hype it.

So you waited six months to make that point.

Plus it was banner line of the original article.
« Last Edit: 02/03/2017 09:41 PM by Star One »

Offline ChrisWilson68

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #38 on: 02/03/2017 09:46 PM »
Engineers just made a quantum computer chip work at room temperature

No, they didn't.  The quote you included directly contradicts that.

What they did do was demonstrate certain properties of a new material that could potentially be used in a quantum computer, and that those properties could potentially enable a quantum computer that works at room temperature in the future.

This is an important step, but let's be realistic and not over-hype it.

So you waited six months to make that point.

I only just now read it because there was new activity on this thread today that made me notice it.

Plus it was banner line of the original article.

Lots of headlines are misleading or outright wrong.  Headlines often aren't even written by the people who wrote the articles.

Offline Nilof

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Re: Quantum Computing Related To Spaceflight
« Reply #39 on: 02/05/2017 09:58 AM »
Since this thread has been bumped, I might as well share this comic about quantum computation by Zach Weinersmith (of SMBC comics) and Scott Aaronson:
« Last Edit: 02/07/2017 03:40 PM by Nilof »
For a variable Isp spacecraft running at constant power and constant acceleration, the mass ratio is linear in delta-v.   Δv = ve0(MR-1). Or equivalently: Δv = vef PMF. Also, this is energy-optimal for a fixed delta-v and mass ratio.

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