Author Topic: Orion Service Module  (Read 53748 times)

Offline Eric Hedman

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #140 on: 06/20/2016 06:59 PM »
Prior to the ATV, ESA had no experience with man-rated craft, so this was actually a really important development for them (which has served to generate knowledge useful for the ESV).
Though they got some knowledge about man-rating from Spacelabs, no?
The man rating includes propulsion systems reliability in the service module.

Online john smith 19

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #141 on: 06/20/2016 07:40 PM »
There is only one little issue with your nice scenario : that the real decision makers, the ESA member states, go along. They are notorious for preferring development to recurring production. See ATV which died after the fifth copy.

Prior to the ATV, ESA had no experience with man-rated craft, so this was actually a really important development for them (which has served to generate knowledge useful for the ESV).
You mean in the same way SX had no man rated experience?

Both ATV and Dragon had to meet full human rating rules in order to berth with the ISS. While Spacelab flew in the payload bay of the Shuttle. While Dragon 2 looks like it's structure has diverged quite a lot from Dragon 1 I'd expect internally it's basic systems are close to identical.
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #142 on: 06/22/2016 08:25 AM »

Offline hektor

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Offline bolun

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #144 on: 08/25/2016 08:53 AM »
The real thing

The European Service Module that will power NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon and beyond is taking shape in the assembly hall at Airbus Defence and Space,  Bremen, Germany. The spacecraft module will provide propulsion, electricity, water, oxygen and nitrogen and thermal control.

Seen here is the primary structure that provides rigidity to the European Service Module much like the chassis of a car. It absorbs the vibrations and energy from launch while a secondary structure protects the module from micrometeoroids and space debris.

Assembly of the thousands of components needed to build the advanced spacecraft started on 19 May with the arrival of the primary structure that was shipped from Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space. In 2018 this structure will be an element of the European Service Module that will be launched into space, as part of the Orion spacecraft, on its first mission to fly more than 64 000 km beyond the Moon and back.

In the background is a poster of ESA’s Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) that was also assembled in this hall in Bremen. Five ATVs flew to the International Space Station to deliver supplies and raise its orbit.  Developing ATV provided the experience necessary to develop the European Service Module in Europe.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/08/The_real_thing

Image credit: Airbus DS

Offline catdlr

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #145 on: 08/31/2016 09:02 PM »
Orion ESM being moved into cleanroom in Bremen

Airbus Defence and Space

Published on Aug 31, 2016
2018 is the launch year for NASA's first Orion mission – which will be uncrewed and powered by the European Service Module built by Airbus Defence and Space for ESA. The service module fulfils the role of a power plant. It drives the capsule and provides fuel and energy. It is also equipped with oxygen tanks to supply the crew.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NMzadk3JRk?t=001

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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #146 on: 09/02/2016 12:12 PM »

Offline redliox

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #147 on: 09/02/2016 09:16 PM »
It is good to see ESA and Airbus are taking their job seriously.  It is great to see the ESM taking shape.

A thought: how greatly will the service module for the crewed EM-2 mission differ from this initial EM-1 module?
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Offline SgtPoivre

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #148 on: 09/13/2016 02:26 PM »
New pictures of on-going Service Module vibration tests are available on NASA Orion Flickr account:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasaorion/
« Last Edit: 09/13/2016 09:27 PM by SgtPoivre »

Offline SgtPoivre

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #149 on: 09/13/2016 09:13 PM »
« Last Edit: 09/13/2016 09:26 PM by SgtPoivre »

Offline Khadgars

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #150 on: 09/13/2016 09:22 PM »
It is good to see ESA and Airbus are taking their job seriously.  It is great to see the ESM taking shape.

A thought: how greatly will the service module for the crewed EM-2 mission differ from this initial EM-1 module?

Great question, one that I am interested in as well.
« Last Edit: 09/13/2016 09:23 PM by Khadgars »

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #151 on: 09/14/2016 07:35 AM »
It is good to see ESA and Airbus are taking their job seriously.  It is great to see the ESM taking shape.

A thought: how greatly will the service module for the crewed EM-2 mission differ from this initial EM-1 module?

Great question, one that I am interested in as well.
And you are not likely to get a detailed answer soon. The SM for EM-1 is already different from the STA as a result of the recently completed CDR. For EM-2, the lessons learned from EM-1 will most likely be incorporated, but they will have to fly EM-1 first. It's not just lessons learned from building and integrating the (E)SM. Flight experience will likely account for additional modifications to the EM-2 flight model.

Offline SgtPoivre

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #152 on: 09/14/2016 09:05 AM »
Flight experience will likely account for additional modifications to the EM-2 flight model.

Except that when EM-1 will fly, the EM-2 ESM will most probably be in late assembly stage.
No room for design changes at that point, except for small local tweaks...
« Last Edit: 09/14/2016 09:06 AM by SgtPoivre »

Offline redliox

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #153 on: 09/14/2016 09:22 AM »
Flight experience will likely account for additional modifications to the EM-2 flight model.

Except that when EM-1 will fly, the EM-2 ESM will most probably be in late assembly stage.
No room for design changes at that point, except for small local tweaks...

Hmm good point, but hard to say.  Considering EM-2 is scheduled for 2023, which is 5 years after EM-1, that's a lot of time.  I'd say the ESM is more likely to be in the early assembly stages, not late, in 2018...and that's assuming ESA doesn't delay assembly or NASA request changes.

I would assume the EM-1 ESM would prioritize propulsion and navigation, and the EM-2 ESM adds full life support on top of that going by bare essentials.  Aside from tweaking life support, wouldn't it be in NASA/ESA's best interests to keep the 2 modules as similar as possible to minimize R&D?
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Offline ncb1397

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #154 on: 09/14/2016 05:54 PM »
Flight experience will likely account for additional modifications to the EM-2 flight model.

Except that when EM-1 will fly, the EM-2 ESM will most probably be in late assembly stage.
No room for design changes at that point, except for small local tweaks...

Hmm good point, but hard to say.  Considering EM-2 is scheduled for 2023....

NASA officials have said that more funding could move the 2023 date to the left. But the question is, more funding compared to what? They can only be referring to the president's out-year funding profile which has a pretty low chance of being passed. There is no other document that they could be using to forecast funding. For instance, the PBR cuts SLS and Orion by 800 million over 2016 levels in 2017. Any chance of that cut actually happening? There is no cut in the house or senate bill and a continuing resolution will fund the programs at 2016 levels.
« Last Edit: 09/14/2016 05:57 PM by ncb1397 »

Offline woods170

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #155 on: 09/14/2016 06:11 PM »
Flight experience will likely account for additional modifications to the EM-2 flight model.

Except that when EM-1 will fly, the EM-2 ESM will most probably be in late assembly stage.
No room for design changes at that point, except for small local tweaks...

Don't agree. IMO, given that there is a three-to-five year gap between EM-1 and EM-2 it is much more likely that work on EM-2 has not even begun yet by the time EM-1 flies. Even at NASA's snails pace it does not take three years to build another flight vehicle and that particularly applies to the (E)SM. It is relatively simple compared to Crew Module.

Online AnalogMan

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #156 on: 09/21/2016 11:34 AM »
Gearing up for Orion propulsion subsystem tests
Posted on 21 Sep 2016 by julien

Engineers are preparing for tests to qualify the propulsion subsystem, including the main engine, for Orion’s European-built service module that will propel the spacecraft during its flight in deep space.

They will test engineering units, fully representative of the engines that will equip the spacecraft that will fly with NASA’s Space Launch System rocket in late 2018.

The tests of the propulsion qualification model include tests of the engines, propellant feed systems, and propulsion control avionics. The tests will start at NASA’s White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico, USA, in spring 2017.

Orion’s service module main engine is a modified Orbital Manoeuvring System engine used before on the Space Shuttle that is being repurposed for use in the European service module.

The propulsion qualification model that will be used for testing will be shipped from Sweden to White Sands November 2016. It consists of two helium tanks (to pressurise the propellant tanks), propellant tanks, thrusters, piping, electronics, pressure control assemblies, a pressure regulation unit and propellant isolation equipment (valves).

Data from the testing at White Sands will verify the proper operation of the service module propulsion subsystem.

While the main engine and test facilities for the Propulsion Qualification Model are prepared for firing up, the main engine has been refurbished and tested at White Sands, and was shipped to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston for vibration testing. The vibration testing is helping to ensure the engine can withstand the loads induced by the rocket during launch. After testing at the Johnson Space Center, the flight engine will be sent to Europe so ESA can integrate it into the Orion service module before delivery to NASA.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2016/09/21/gearing-up-for-orion-propulsion-subsystem-tests/

The video below shows testing of the 220 N engines built by Airbus used for attitude control:
http://download.esa.int/mpeg/3hzfiringlunarlander_H264.mp4?_=1

Photo Captions:

Top:      Propulsion testing in Sweden. Credits: OHB
Middle:  NASA's White Sands Test Facility. Credits: NASA
Bottom: Propulsion Qualification Model (PQM), including the structure and the propellant tanks,
              ready for the start of integration activities at OHB Sweden. Credits: OHB
« Last Edit: 09/21/2016 11:36 AM by AnalogMan »

Offline catdlr

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #157 on: 11/01/2016 03:29 AM »
Orion Test Article on the Move

NASA Glenn Research Center

Published on Oct 31, 2016
Time-lapse video shows the move of Orion’s service module from the vibration table to the assembly high bay area in Plum Brook’s Space Power Facility. (no sound)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00Xs3XnXvg0?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #158 on: 03/17/2017 01:49 PM »
Quote
#orionesm's propellant tank successfully underwent vibration test! Find out more about @NASA_Orion on the blog: http://orionesm.airbusdefenceandspace.com @esa

https://twitter.com/airbusspace/status/842714980462026752

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #159 on: 03/29/2017 12:13 PM »
Quote
Jeff Foust‏ @jeff_foust 1m1 minute ago

[Billl] Hill: delivery date for European Service Module for Orion “continues to erode”.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/847058569635774464

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