Author Topic: Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept  (Read 130812 times)

Offline JasonAW3

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Re: Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept
« Reply #560 on: 06/17/2016 01:52 PM »
The moon should be cheaper now than when Constellation was the only path. Between SLS and more capable lower price commercial LVs (FH, Vulcan, OA NGLV) plus X prize landers and rovers costs have come down. The commercial  companies are more than capable of handling cargo side of any missions.

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Assuming that the Moon does become a goal, then this could get SpaceX's MCT partially funded by the government.  Assuming that they can prove that they can land a Dragon 2 capsule, on land, after reentry, that is.
My God!  It's full of universes!

Offline JasonAW3

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Re: Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept
« Reply #561 on: 06/17/2016 02:03 PM »

     Is it just me or did anyone else notice the rather oddly regular shape of 2008 EV5 in the Nasa ARM reference document?

    It looks like a pair of tunicated cones fused base to base, then hammered a bit over their outer surfaces.  Oddly regular in shape.

     Probably two same sized asteroids that had a low speed impact with one another, squishing out a bit in the middle, but still, a rather odd shape.
My God!  It's full of universes!

Offline KelvinZero

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Re: Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept
« Reply #562 on: 06/21/2016 02:58 AM »
With the discovery of HO3, there is now a target to aim for without hauling some VW sized rock back from elsewhere. HO3 is about 9M mi at its closest. Taking Orion with a Bigelow hab seems like a reasonable early (yea..that's a relative term here) mission.
I see a thread has started on that. I will put my negativity here :-)

I far prefer the ARRM concept. The attraction of actually going to a rock just seems to be romanticism to me. I think if we do the ARRM mission, and extend it to a DSH, we will actually be practicing everything we need to master an asteroid colony, as well as other possible applications of a high lunar orbit outpost. it is closer and safer, I expect allowing Apollo-13 style free return. There is no reason to tie yourself to just one rock that happens to be in a convenient orbit. Instead we can keep pulling in new samples to our convenient near-earth ISRU testbed.

Offline mike robel

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Re: Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept
« Reply #563 on: 06/21/2016 08:26 PM »
A search for Asteroid 2004 MN4 did not turn up a lot of hits on the site.  Seems to me, since it will be in the neighborhood, we would be able to accomplish multiple tasks by sending a spacecraft after it.  Presupposing it could be ready in time.  After all, it will be sailing by in visual sight of half the planet in 2029 and possibly around in 2035 again.

Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept
« Reply #564 on: 06/23/2016 07:21 AM »
Does anyone have information on how much cargo the ARM SEP tug can take to lunar orbit?
Also how much cargo to Mars orbit?
I am assuming the SEP tug returns to LEO empty to pick up a second cargo.

Offline catdlr

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Re: Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept
« Reply #565 on: 03/20/2017 09:39 PM »
These NASA-designed grippers can lift massive rocks

Published on Mar 20, 2017
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab created these super-strong grippers that can anchor and grip rocks at any angle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgvZaz-36us?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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