Author Topic: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky  (Read 30188 times)

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #20 on: 11/24/2012 07:31 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #21 on: 11/24/2012 07:35 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #22 on: 11/24/2012 07:42 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #23 on: 11/24/2012 07:46 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #24 on: 11/24/2012 07:51 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #25 on: 11/24/2012 07:54 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #26 on: 11/24/2012 07:57 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #27 on: 11/24/2012 08:01 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #28 on: 11/24/2012 08:03 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #29 on: 11/24/2012 08:10 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #30 on: 11/24/2012 08:14 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #31 on: 11/24/2012 08:18 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #32 on: 11/24/2012 08:18 PM »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #33 on: 11/24/2012 08:21 PM »
October 5: DISCOVERY CREW READY
"We're very anxious to launch and Discovery looks great. It looks brand new," said U. S. Air Force Col. Frederick Gregory, Commander of the Shuttle for its November launch. He and fellow crew members Pilot John Blaha and Mission Specialists Story Musgrave, Sonny Carter and Kathryn Thornton were at Kennedy Space Center today as workers put the finishing touches on the orbiter. Carter said, "It looks like the cleanest thing you've ever seen." (Florida Today, Oct. 6, 1989)


October 6: ON A ROLL
Discovery was moved from its OPF hangar into the Vehicle Assembly Building today. The transfer was made on a new transporter flatbed. Previously, the orbiters have been towed on their landing gear. (Countdown, December 1989 – edited)

Offline Ares67

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #34 on: 11/24/2012 08:22 PM »
October 21: CARGO DEVICE DAMAGED
A device used to move Shuttle cargo to and from the launch pad today when a crane accidentally sent a 40,000-pound concrete slab ramming into the device. Kennedy Space Center spokesman Dick Young said the cause of the accident was unknown. "The temporary unavailability of the damaged canister is not expected to impact KSC's Space Shuttle operations as the remaining canister can be scheduled to move payloads between processing and pad facilities," he said.

KSC Director Forrest McCartney was expected to name an investigation board shortly. Earlier this year a mobile crane at the space center narrowly missed falling into an office building under construction near the Vehicle Assembly Building and on June 19 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station a launch pad crane failed, sending a hook into the INSAT communications satellite which was seriously damaged. (Florida Today, Oct. 22/23, 1989)


October 23: CRANE INVESTIGATION UNDERWAY
NASA's crane accident investigation team met for the first time today; the twelve-member team is headed by William Mahoney, Payload Processing Division Chief. The team will meet on a daily basis until a determination is reached concerning the cause of the accident and the extent of the damage. Investigators will interview witnesses and crew members who were inside the VAB about 2:20 a.m. October 21 when a slab fell from a mobile crane into a payload transport canister. The slab, simulating a Shuttle payload, was being removed from the canister when it fell. No one was injured. Investigators will also review crew training records and a history of the crane operation before issuing a preliminary report Nov. 8. (florida Today, Oct. 24/25, 1989)


October 24: DISCOVERY ROLLOUT DELAYED
Discovery's rollout to launch pad 39B was delayed due to active thunderstorm activity till 12:01 a.m. October 26. The shuttle's transfer to the launch pad will mean Playalinda Beach will be closed to the public until after launch. (Florida Today, Oct. 25, 1989, Countdown, December 1989 – edited)


October 26: WEATHER DELAYS DISCOVERY ROLLOUT
A line of thunderstorms 30 miles offshore prevented the shuttle's transfer from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad early this morning, said Kennedy Space Center spokesman George Diller. Weather may also preclude a rollout on the 27th. (Florida Today, Oct. 26, 1989)


DAMAGED VAB CANISTER REMAINS OUT OF SERVICE
The cargo canister damaged in a mobile crane accident on October 21 will be out of service for at least two months, concluded the accident investigation board. Because payload bay doors closed smoothly, investigators do not think they were damaged. The canister will be moved October 28 to another area of Kennedy Space Center, where NASA and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co., the contractor responsible for payload operations, will assess the cost to repair the device. The board also developed guidelines today to recreate the operation of the crane at the time of the accident. (Florida Today, Oct. 27, 1989)

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #35 on: 11/24/2012 08:24 PM »
October 27: DISCOVERY ROLLS OUT
After leaving the VAB at 11:31 p.m. EST yesterday, Discovery crawled out to launch pad 39B this morning, arriving at 5:30 a.m. amid storm clouds and light rain. "The vehicle is waterproofed and the type of showers we had would not affect the shuttle," said Kennedy Space Center spokesman Karl Kristofferson. The orbiter was “harddown” on the pad at 7:34 a.m. EST.

The crew of Discovery is expected to leave Ellington Field early Saturday (Oct. 28) for a trip to KSC. There they are expected to participate in reviewing emergency pad evacuation procedures, driving the M-113 armored tank which is to be used in an escape attempt in the event there is an explosion on the pad and joining the KSC launch team for the traditional Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test which begins October 29 and ends the next day. (JSC Space News Roundup, Oct. 27, 1989, Florida Today, Oct. 28, 1989, and Countdown, December 1989 – edited)

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #36 on: 11/24/2012 08:26 PM »
October 28: ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE AT KSC
Commander Frederick Gregory, Pilot John Blaha and Mission Specialists Manley "Sonny” Carter, Kathryn Thornton and Story Musgrave arrived at Kennedy Space Center today at 9 a.m. in three T-38 training jets. As the aircraft came to a stop, Musgrave photographed the waiting news media. Later in the day, despite high winds and scattered showers, the astronauts reviewed emergency evacuation procedures on the launch pad where their Shuttle, Discovery, is being readied for its November launch. (Florida Today, Oct. 29, 1989)

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #37 on: 11/24/2012 08:28 PM »

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #38 on: 11/24/2012 08:29 PM »
October 30: REALLY A GOOD COUNTDOWN TEST
The Discovery crew successfully concluded its practice countdown aboard the shuttle today and NASA spokeswoman Lisa Malone said, "It was really a good test – no hardware failures." The test, which covered the last 24 hours prior to launch, familiarizes the crew and launch team with pre-launch operations. The astronauts were onboard the orbiter for the final two hours of the simulation, adjusting switches and testing communications links. A simulated engine cutoff at the T-4 second mark at about 11:04 a.m. EST marked the successful conclusion of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The Fred Gregory and his crew even had time to note the Halloween holiday by wearing funny hats and carrying jack-o’-lanterns on the way to the pad. The will fly back to JSC later this afternoon and will not return to the launch site until three days before launch, expected no earlier than November 20. Meanwhile the crew for Columbia’s STS-32 mission in December is expected to arrive at the Cape tomorrow to inspect the orbiter’s cockpit. (Florida Today, Oct. 31/Nov. 1, 1989, and JSC Space News Roundup, Nov. 3, 1989 – edited)

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Re: Discovery STS-33 – Falcon in the Sky
« Reply #39 on: 11/24/2012 08:31 PM »

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